Overcharging? - Kia Niro Forum
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 12:56 PM Thread Starter
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Overcharging?

hello, I was wondering if I dont use the scedual charging and for instance leave it plugged into the trickle charger too long when its full.. will it overcharge and damage the battery?

Or does it have protection and fail safes?

thanks

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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Michael Tomko View Post
hello, I was wondering if I dont use the scedual charging and for instance leave it plugged into the trickle charger too long when its full.. will it overcharge and damage the battery?

Or does it have protection and fail safes?

thanks
You can sleep with both closed eyes! The system knows when too stop the charge when finish.

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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 02:11 PM Thread Starter
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thanks for the info! 🙂

If it shuts off what is the point of setting charging times? Where i live there is no peak hours for power so it all costs the same regardless time of day charging. The salesman told me i should use it but i dont fully understand the point of it.

thanks again for the tips

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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 02:43 PM
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thanks for the info! 🙂

If it shuts off what is the point of setting charging times? Where i live there is no peak hours for power so it all costs the same regardless time of day charging. The salesman told me i should use it but i dont fully understand the point of it.

thanks again for the tips
You answered your own question. There's no real benefit to scheduled charging unless your utility offers off-peak discounts.

Some folks use the schedule function to allow the car and battery to cool down before charging, but I figure the Kia battery management system can take care of that stuff for me.

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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 06:05 PM
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Not much point to scheduling for PHEV (other than off-peak charging). But for BEV, you could be hurting battery longevity if you fully charge every night - why do it if you don't need the range the next day? Very useful for the BEV.

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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 06:42 PM
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Some small benefit in scheduling the charge, particularly in hot weather to protect the battery. Delay so it's not hot from driving and schedule for the coolest time of day, both so the battery is as cool as possible during charging. Again, a very small advantage....
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-16-2019, 09:15 AM
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Some small benefit in scheduling the charge, particularly in hot weather to protect the battery. Delay so it's not hot from driving and schedule for the coolest time of day, both so the battery is as cool as possible during charging. Again, a very small advantage....
I'm actually pretty skeptical that this is really necessary or beneficial. Even the charger for a $100 cordless drill has enough smarts to hold off charging a hot battery. I'd be completely flabbergasted to learn that the charger for a $30,000 PHEV doesn't do that as well.

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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-16-2019, 02:49 PM
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I'm actually pretty skeptical that this is really necessary or beneficial. Even the charger for a $100 cordless drill has enough smarts to hold off charging a hot battery. I'd be completely flabbergasted to learn that the charger for a $30,000 PHEV doesn't do that as well.

I wonder... Whether you are designing the charging system for a cordless drill or for an automobile, it seems to me that your primary goals are to prevent the battery from heating to a point where it catches fire, and to ensure that the battery survives its warranty period. Beyond that, it's likely to be difficult for the design engineer to know where to "draw the line". One person might plug in their drill (or car) and want it to begin charging immediately so they can use it in an hour. Another person might not want to use it until tomorrow and given a choice, might have a strong interest in delaying charge until cooler temps prevail in order to maximize battery lifetime. Just for the sake of discussion, lets assume that the design engineer believes that if they prevent charging above 120 degrees F, then the battery is likely to be safe and to survive its warranty period, just barely, but if they prevent charging above 100 F, the battery is likely to survive its warranty period by two years. If they choose 120, they'll keep the "want it in an hour" person happy, but the "want it tomorrow" person's interests aren't well served.



Responding to the original question in this thread, traditional lead-acid batteries benefit from a small "float charge", but there's some reason to think that this might not be good for Li-Ion batteries. This raises an interesting question: if you leave your car plugged in for an extended period after it's fully charged, how does the charging system respond to that? Does it shut down and stay down? Probably not: at some point the parasitic load is likely to reduce the charge to the point where the charger begins charging again. That's probably not a big deal when the battery is new, because when the battery is new it's not being charged to 100% of it's designed capacity. But when the battery gets (considerably) older and the BMS starts allowing charge to approach 100% capacity, perhaps it's better to disconnect after the battery is fully charged, or at least put the charger on a schedule that causes it to shut down and stay down.

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