Any advice on storing a Niro hybrid over the winter? - Kia Niro Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-16-2018, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Any advice on storing a Niro hybrid over the winter?

I'm not driving my Niro through the winter and it's already been setting almost 2 months now. I suppose a battery tender wouldn't hurt the 12V battery any or maybe just starting it once in awhile would be enough.Any advice to not damage the hybrid system from setting that long?
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-16-2018, 03:52 PM
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Since there is no 12 volt battery, I dont think a battery tender will work. Where would you plug it in?

The Niro will shut itself off if the starting part of the hybrid battery gets too weak. Had it happen when I left the map light on overnight. You just press the reset button.

Not sure how the hybrid system will act with no charging over the winter. Might need to call the dealership on that one.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-16-2018, 10:15 PM
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I'm certain that the PHEV has a 12V battery and I'm pretty sure that the HEV does too, although I've read that in older models, it's integral with the high voltage battery. So maybe a battery tender wouldn't be a bad idea if you can identify a safe way to connect it. But if it was me, I'd be tempted to do what was described in this thread: https://www.kianiroforum.com/forum/9...ge-update.html


Another thing I'd be tempted to do (unless you are 110% certain that rodents aren't a concern) is fill an onion bag or an old nylon stocking with about 1 cup of mothballs and then look for some place under the hood to hang it. Just remember to remove it before you start the car in the spring. Some people have reported damage to their car wiring from rodents when the car is just parked overnight, but in my experience, all the people I know who have had this problem have experienced it after leaving the car parked for an extended period. It's a cheap precaution and it can head off a very expensive repair bill. I did this for the last two winters that I owned (but wasn't driving) my Toyota Tacoma, and there were no ill effects.



If the car is parked outside in the sun and you don't expect to put enough miles on it to wear out the tires in four years or so, you might consider putting plastic trash bags over the tires to protect them from degradation. People who own trailers and only put 1000 miles a year on their trailer tires usually have to replace the tires not because the tread wore out, but because the sidewalls got "dry rot" due to UV and ozone exposure.


One last, "old school" thought on preparing a car for an extended period of downtime: it used to be recommended to remove the spark plugs and squirt "fogging oil" in the cylinders, and then crank the engine a few times to coat the cylinder walls with it. The idea was to prevent corrosion. I've seen really old cars and tractors that were taken care of with these kinds of techniques, and they ran like new. But I'd be reluctant to attempt this with a Niro because you can't easily crank the engine a couple of times with the spark plugs removed because the computer decides when to start and stop the ICE and if it does try to start it, I have no way to predict how it would behave when it noticed that the spark plugs weren't installed and it didn't start... might do more harm than good. Also, even if you could solve that problem, I have concerns about what the impact might be in the spring when you burn off that fogging oil and modern high-tech exhaust components like Oxygen sensors get s a whiff of it.


I've had a few occasions to ponder the question of what is best when a car is going to sit: do you just leave it, or do you start it once every couple of weeks? Where I come out is that if it is in a garage (or parked on pavement), then once it has sat for a week, you might was well let it sit for the season because the oil has probably already largely drained down as much as it will. There's more wear on the engine to start it when the oil has had a lot of time to drain out, so best to reduce the number of occasions when you expose it to that kind of torture. But this is just my opinion, I've never seen anyone study this in a scientific way.


But if the car is parked outside on dirt or gravel, then my observation has been that it benefits from being started and driven every couple of weeks. I've seen cars that were left parked on dirt driveways and not driven develop corrosion problems at a much faster rate than other cars in the same driveway that were being driven every day.

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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-17-2018, 09:32 AM
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Consider the journey a new car makes before it is sold. While Niros have been selling well, it could easily spend three months (just on the journey to the dealer) not being turned on. I think you are OK for a few months. Rodents are definitely a concern if you are not keeping in a closed garage. More so in recent years as wiring insulation is being made from organic materials that are apparently tasty.

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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-17-2018, 11:09 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys, I have my Corvette, bike and my Chevy Truck also stored for the winter and take all the precautions I can with mice. I do like the mothball idea. Their not getting to the bike and Corvette though.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-27-2018, 04:49 PM Thread Starter
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The Niro has been setting for just about two months now and today I started it and pulled it outside. No problem starting and the batteries are still more than 60% charged.
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-02-2019, 07:55 AM
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Any advice for storing a Niro

Seems we are crossing path-concerns here! We put our Kia Niro into storage in mid-September and expect to retrieve it in mid-May. Here is what we did: 1) turned a switch off to disconnect the battery pack. It is located under the dash on left side of steering wheel; 2) disconnected the 12-volt starter battery located on the right side of the trunk; 3) filled the tank with high octane fuel and put synthetic oil in. We did not use all the various rodent-control suggestions because nearly all of them do not keep their "potency" for long-term storage. I wish we had parked the tires on perforated plastic blocks as I understand moisture can wick into tires via gravel, dirt, concrete, wood, etc. Some have suggested higher PSI and we will look into that in the future if we need storage again. As batteries not being drained (we hope) we did not use a trickle charger. Of course we will worry about it while it sits but at this point we can not act on this "worry" and so we keep talking ourselves out of such anxiety!!!!
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-02-2019, 08:56 AM Thread Starter
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I do pump up the tires on everything I store to about 45psi.
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-02-2019, 06:35 PM
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I read reports of new owners receiving Kia and Hyundai cars with psi over 50 when the dealer misses resetting the pressure. So 55 psi might be a better storage pressure than 45, and if you have access to nitrogen, the pressure will maintain better than normal air.

I'm on a trip of four weeks away from my Niro and I didn't even think about upping the pressure. Might have been a good idea. If manufacturers up the pressure for shipping, I assume the problem will occur often enough to be worthwhile. But I've not read of anyone who has experienced the issue of flat spots after a few months of sitting. Maybe I'd have to hang out on RV forums. I'll have to ask my tire dealer when I get home how common that might be.

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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-03-2019, 09:01 AM Thread Starter
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I have read that flat spots in tires is now a thing of the past.
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