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2020 KIA Niro EX Premium "NON-PHEV - Saved $10K and the extension cord for the Christmas lights."
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thought I had a dead battery this morning. 馃槄
Was about to jump start the Niro when I remembered it has a 12-Volt reset button.
Hit the button and then the ignition and everything started up fine.
Battery gauge shows the battery was not low.
Gonna unplug the Ultra Gauge just in case it was leaching the battery.
Cool but useless that the Dash has a display to show you the hood is up.

6407


I noticed it takes 20-seconds for the interior lights to fade out when the door is closed.
Is the light timer programmable or is it the only option other than no interior lights? 馃槵
 

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Thought I had a dead battery this morning. 馃槄
Was about to jump start the Niro when I remembered it has a 12-Volt reset button.
Hit the button and then the ignition and every started up fine.
Battery idiot light shows the battery was not low.
Gonna unplug the Ultra Gauge just in case it was leaching the battery.
Cool but useless that the Dash has a display to show you the hood is up.

View attachment 6407

I noticed it takes 20-seconds for the interior lights to fade out when the door is closed.
Is the light timer programmable or is it the only option other than no interior lights? 馃槵
Definitely could be the UltraGauge if it doesn't automatically shut off when the car is off. The 12V battery in the Niro is pretty small and can be easily discharged by devices that stay on when the car is off. In most cases this isn't a huge deal, as in HEV you have the battery reset button and in the PHEV we have the AUX Bat Saver that will recharge the 12V battery from the traction pack when it gets low. Neither is a perfect solution obviously and the better option is to unplug any accessories when parked.

According to the manual for my '18 PHEV the interior lights should go out immediately when you lock the doors. I've never tried that though.
 

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It could be the OBD reader as that port continues to provide voltage at all times. It is even more suspicious if your phone is within 20 to 30 feet from car. So I've had two different OBD readers drain my battery. On of the times, my phone battery was also unusually low when I plugged it in at night. If there was active communication, that increases power drain. Often having your key fob within range overnight is thought to drain the battery with the car communicating with the fob. I doubt that theory - my fob is always in range and I've only had those two events that were cured by removing the OBD reader.

Now I will say that if you look at the power specs on BT OBD devices, their current use is trivial. Some OBD readers claim to have a sleep mode - no idea how that works but they cost more. And there are many owners who leave their devices plugged in and never have an issue. As I was bit twice by two different ones, I remove it when not in use. I will say that the battery "reset" button works great!
 

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The Ultra Gauge did not drain your battery. Mine has been plugged in for 3 years without removal.
I left a door slightly open once and that did kill my battery.
 

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The Ultra Gauge did not drain your battery. Mine has been plugged in for 3 years without removal.
I assumed the OP has the wireless version. If so, it could cause excess current drain like any other BT reader. And as I said, some users of such devices don't have problems. If it is the Ultra Gauge with the screen like yours and the screen backlight turns off when the car is not being driven, then that model is unlikely to cause a problem so I would agree.
 

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It could be the OBD reader as that port continues to provide voltage at all times. It is even more suspicious if your phone is within 20 to 30 feet from car. So I've had two different OBD readers drain my battery. On of the times, my phone battery was also unusually low when I plugged it in at night. If there was active communication, that increases power drain. Often having your key fob within range overnight is thought to drain the battery with the car communicating with the fob. I doubt that theory - my fob is always in range and I've only had those two events that were cured by removing the OBD reader.

Now I will say that if you look at the power specs on BT OBD devices, their current use is trivial. Some OBD readers claim to have a sleep mode - no idea how that works but they cost more. And there are many owners who leave their devices plugged in and never have an issue. As I was bit twice by two different ones, I remove it when not in use. I will say that the battery "reset" button works great!
As usual kticolev takes it to another level! TKS "lev" BTW, where is the "reset" button on my 2018 Nire PHEV?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yep, I suspect it was the UltraGauge plugged into the OBD port.
Did away with it and no troubles since.
Had used it in my Prius C which did NOT have a tach or engine temp display, just a hamster 1.3 engine.


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BTW, where is the "reset" button on my 2018 Nire PHEV?
Not equipped - only on cars with lithium 12 volt batteries. Too bad as the PHEV is a killer on lead acid batteries. I'd recommend using a smart trickle charger once on month to help keep your battery in good shape. Might be too late for your current battery. The issue is the charging logic often allows your battery to get down close to 12 volts which is damaging.
 

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Had used it in my Prius C which did NOT have a tach or engine temp display, just a hamster 1.3 engine.
That car is equipped with a much larger capacity 12 volt lead acid battery. So excess current isn't as likely to cause an issue (depending on how often you drove it).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yeah, my Prius C and V have real 12V batteries with higher charge acceptance and higher cranking characteristics.
Replaced the V's stock battery last year with an Optima Yellow-top AGM battery at the cost of $279.
Should last 10-years, trouble-free.
 

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could you tell me where the 12 volt battery reset button is
For the left hand drive Niro hybrid the battery reset switch is to the left of the steering wheel. It might be on the other side for the right side drive version. The PHEV doesn't have this switch, it uses the larger traction pack to automatically recharge the 12V battery if it becomes discharged.

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could you tell me where the 12 volt battery reset button is
In Britain (and indeed worldwide except North America), only 2018 and later HEVs have this button. All other Niros have a 12 volt lead acid battery with a different management scheme.
 

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From my understanding, it is not the power draw of OBDII scanners that directly cause a dead 12v battery due to their minute power consumption, but rather they will sometimes cause the car鈥檚 ECM to not go into sleep mode. So the car鈥檚 computer pulls the power and kills the battery due to constant communication with the OBDII device.
 

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That's a new story to me. Interesting. However, there are a ton of CPUs in the car, and some of them have to remain active for alarms and door locks. Something has to be working to have the OBD port on 24 hours too I would think.
 

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From my understanding, it is not the power draw of OBDII scanners that directly cause a dead 12v battery due to their minute power consumption, but rather they will sometimes cause the car鈥檚 ECM to not go into sleep mode. So the car鈥檚 computer pulls the power and kills the battery due to constant communication with the OBDII device.
That would make sense. Higher end OBD scanners have their own sleep mode which would in theory allow the OBD computer (part of the ECU I would assume but as @yticolev points out there are a bunch of processors in the car and most of them hang off the same bus as the OBD port) to go to sleep itself.
 
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