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Discussion Starter #1
I just had the safety inspection on my Niro and I need new rear pads and Rotors. I've changed them myself on other vehicles but never a hybrid. Is there anything different when regenerative braking is involved? I just don't want to get in over my head.

Thanks!
 

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While I haven't looked that closely at the brakes themselves, regen braking has nothing to do with the brakes themselves. It's all done within the e-motor. I doubt you'll have any problems doing them yourself.

Question: what is the mileage on your car? It doesn't seem old enough to need brake work yet, unless you really drive a lot.
 

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It's pushing 80000. I had it inspected at the dealer and they showed me the pads, they have two deep grooves in the pads caused by rust on the rotors (their words)
 

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I amen the second opinion. The grooves could be in the design of the pad.
There's another thread running from a guy who had his rear brakes changed too but at 30k. Why only the rears? Are they easier, simpler to change than the fronts that makes it a quicker profit???? The fronts should wear faster. They do 70+% of the braking.
 

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Maybe I should have added that they said the front pads are on the verge of needing replacement too but they legally can't fail it over the front ones, which have 3mm left, apparently. They did say if I replace the front pads I should also do the rotors but that doesn't seem right to me so im just worrying about the rear wheels for now
 

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3mm on the front pads doesn't seem unreasonable for a non-hybrid. But it still seems like a lot of wear for a car with regen braking. Perhaps Kia doesn't use pads with the same life span as a "normal" car, so they can argue that "all cars need brakes by 80,000 miles". Not a true statement, of course, but a way to generate revenue for their dealers. Since I have gone 60-80,000 miles without a problem, and I live on a steep hill requiring steady braking as soon as I leave my driveway, I am tending to pads that just don't last as long.

EDIT: I just remembered you're in Canada, so I assume you meant you're coming up on 80,000 kms. That's just under 50,000 miles, and that's still not what I would consider acceptable, unless you live on a hill like I do.
 

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Whatever happened to resurfacing rotors? Is that still a thing? Seems like dealers are quick to replace them but unless they’re warped/cracked or structurally damaged in some way, why can’t they just turn’em and put them back on?
 

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Whatever happened to resurfacing rotors? Is that still a thing? Seems like dealers are quick to replace them but unless they’re warped/cracked or structurally damaged in some way, why can’t they just turn’em and put them back on?
People selling brakes are always quick to point out that the rotors don't "mic up" to specs so their too thin to cut the rotors. Seems like newer rotors are made too thin compared to the "old days"......or is it just a sales pitch?:unsure:
 

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I have spent time with a real rarity nowadays. An honest garage owner. His take is that resurfacing a rotor is a total waste of time. It was a great con-job that was done to people telling them that the rotor needs to be a totally flat and shiny metal surface. What you don't want is badly warped and cracked or scored surface. That will indicate that there is something wrong with the actual calipers. For most cars you can get 2 sometimes 3 replacement sets of pads before you need to change the rotors.

On my old Ford Edge, it had a problem that the calipers would not center themseves properly. Also they tended to stick and that might have added to the terrible gas milage that I got from that car. When I pulled off the front wheels to replace the breaks, one side was pretty much pristine, but the other side had warn a deep track into the rotor. The pad one the back side that was pristine had almost zero wear on it, but the front side had warn down to about 1-2mm. I replaced the breaks and about 2 months later traded the car for the Niro.
 

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I just had the safety inspection on my Niro and I need new rear pads and Rotors. I've changed them myself on other vehicles but never a hybrid. Is there anything different when regenerative braking is involved? I just don't want to get in over my head.

Thanks!
I just had my Niro in 4 weeks ago and it's got 91k miles and they noted front breaks at the toon of $495. My wife's Hybrid fusion were warp at 30k. I've had 2 Jeta TDI's and gone 120k. 90k isn't unreasonable but I do believe they should last over 120k with re-gen breaking. I think there cheaper pads. FYI for top brand Bosch or Raybesto pads and rotors your looking at $150-$200 for DIY.
Has anyone had their Serpentine Belt replaced. My dealer had to order it said they have never replaced one, and have yet to notify me it's in.
 

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Whatever happened to resurfacing rotors? Is that still a thing? Seems like dealers are quick to replace them but unless they’re warped/cracked or structurally damaged in some way, why can’t they just turn’em and put them back on?
Under federal law they cannot unless after, resurfacing they will still be a certain thickness as the law says
 
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