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There seems to be some variation in the units.... earlier units apparently have a 2 wire connector and are a speaker only, as is the one pictured. In the dash, above the glove box is the control unit and it has a 45 watt amp.

Later units have the connector in the center, as in the video I posted, and are CAN bus devices and the logic is inside the box, and they appear to be mounted higher on the Kia.

Greg
 

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There seems to be some variation in the units.... earlier units apparently have a 2 wire connector and are a speaker only, as is the one pictured. In the dash, above the glove box is the control unit and it has a 45 watt amp.

Later units have the connector in the center, as in the video I posted, and are CAN bus devices and the logic is inside the box, and they appear to be mounted higher on the Kia.

Greg
Oh man I may have to look into this. Sounds like it might be pretty straightforward to add custom sounds for the earlier models. Just use the control box output as a trigger and play a custom .wav file. I'm interested.
 

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Yep, could have some fun there... did you see the video of Eric Reuter's I linked on my site? You see the actual CAN bus commands.

Greg
Haven't looked at it yet. Definitely will just to see how involved it would be.
 

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So it looks like a with some disassembly, and some electronics, and some software, it can be done.
 

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So, looks like finding the control wires behind the "missing switch" on the dash is a flop, the wires are not in the harness to support the switch, i.e. even if you bought the switch module with all 4 switches in place, no wires in the harness go to the switch.

My pages are updated:

 

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So, looks like finding the control wires behind the "missing switch" on the dash is a flop, the wires are not in the harness to support the switch, i.e. even if you bought the switch module with all 4 switches in place, no wires in the harness go to the switch.

My pages are updated:

I saw some video on the Tesla and the Leaf. They also show really obnoxious noises now. They both have continuous sounds - not beeps. I suspect the db meter averages, which means the beep has to be louder than spec to get the average volume up.
 

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Most db meters have a slow and a fast scale, there are also "weightings" that try to fit how we perceive sound


I hauled my old radio shack meter out, the one that made the trash company repair their truck, and also forced the golf course to fix one of their mowers.

Have not measured my car yet, need to find the manual and see if it is A or C weighted.

Greg
 

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Good smartphones (like iPhones) have calibrated mikes and a dB app used with them is as accurate as the Radio Shack version (which was as good as anything until you spent 10 times more). I still own the Radio Shack one. But as they say, the best dB meter is the one with you.
 

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I see that Z weighing is wide band, C weighing runs about 20 Hz to 10 KHz, and A weighing runs about 400 Hz to 20Khz. Those frequencies are where the signal is attenuated 3db.

Wikipedia shows these noise makers in development since about 2010, spurred on by the US National Federation of the Blind. It points out that ICE cars are also sometimes as quiet as EV's. Many car makers and others have been working on noise makers for cars. There is an issue of noise pollution. Some car companies have not installed anything - waiting for it to be mandated.
 

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I used a Radio Shack (miss that store) dB meter at church for years while mixing front of house, and found them far better than any freeware app I used on a phone. I don't think the microphone in a phone is good enough for accurate measurements, as it's designed for voice communication, which is a pretty narrow section of the audio band.

At church I always use C weighting, as I need to include the bass energy in how loud it is in the sanctuary. But for the pedestrian warning in vehicles, I could see the A weighting being more accurate. There's no real low frequency energy in that annoying beep.
 

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The newer phones get a lot of time recording video, so I cannot agree that the microphone is "designed for voice communication" only, or if it is even a priority.

As a point of interest, the frequency response of cell phone microphones are often reviewed in detail:

So, it does depend on the cell phone, and of course it is not calibrated nor sold as calibrated or with a guaranteed frequency response, but typically the cell phone microphones are of very good frequency response.

I believe the "A" weighting is the one most commonly used for ambient noise levels... I looked up our city's noise abatement regulations, and they specify the "A" weighting for noise limits for enforcement.

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Phone communication is bandwidth limited, the microphone is not. And at least on iPhones, it is calibrated so response deviations are adjusted.
 
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