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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well mine died and I can't even jump start right now. I called around and searched online and no one has them and some say discontinued. I think this is the correct part number.

Battery - Kia (37110-G5510)

I am planning to pull it out and take it to some stores to see if I can find an equivalent or get it rebuilt. Is this what I have to do? Any idea where to get a new replacement?

So frustrating and even worse because I have been lurking this forum and should have known this would happen. I was planning on taking it to the dealer's shop and try making them replace it for free based on this NHTSA bulletin, but now I just need a new one or to get it rebuilt so I can drive..
 

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2021 Niro PHEV EX
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Well mine died and I can't even jump start right now. I called around and searched online and no one has them and some say discontinued. I think this is the correct part number.

Battery - Kia (37110-G5510)

I am planning to pull it out and take it to some stores to see if I can find an equivalent or get it rebuilt. Is this what I have to do? Any idea where to get a new replacement?

So frustrating and even worse because I have been lurking this forum and should have known this would happen. I was planning on taking it to the dealer's shop and try making them replace it for free based on this NHTSA bulletin, but now I just need a new one or to get it rebuilt so I can drive..
I just replaced mine with this: Advance Auto Parts - Down for Maintenance
It may be the most expensive option, but given the unusual cycling and discharge behavior of the 12V battery in these cars... for that replacement I was willing to pay for AGM and the highest capacity that would fit. It's 99% identical to the OEM in appearance, just adding a lift handle. A nearby Advance Auto Parts had one in stock and installed it for me. Caveat: another nearby store also had one, and would not touch the car, being on their "no-install list." You may already be prepared to swap it yourself. I was. Since the store was willing and it'd save me time, I was happy to - with my supervision - let them do it.

The OEM appears to be size group H4. I've read some group 26R batteries also work. Whatever battery you use, be sure to vent it to the outside e.g. using the provided tube.
 

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It's probably the best just to go to your dealer to get a new battery. As long as they're a decent dealer. The times I needed a battery for my Sedona the price from the dealer was the same as the various parts places and then you know your getting the right battery and they can do their various checks. If it won't start being jumped maybe it's something else and not even the battery? If you do go to the dealer don't forget to check their website if they have coupons, discounts ect.
 

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The battery you are referring to is 12v, not 24. I've edited the thread title. Batteries can't be rebuilt like other car components. So you have to find a new one. Yes, lead acid batteries can be recycled, but that's not rebuilding them.
 

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2021 Niro PHEV EX
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It's probably the best just to go to your dealer to get a new battery. As long as they're a decent dealer. The times I needed a battery for my Sedona the price from the dealer was the same as the various parts places and then you know your getting the right battery and they can do their various checks. If it won't start being jumped maybe it's something else and not even the battery? If you do go to the dealer don't forget to check their website if they have coupons, discounts ect.
I agree if there isn't a reason you know of (e.g. leaving an interior light on overnight) why the battery is flat - and more importantly the jump's not working, it's best to get the car checked by the dealer. Folks have also been able to get replacement batteries from their dealer at a reasonable price. However I feel the OEM battery is barely adequate and not uncommonly dies inside of three years - even from just a few unexpected deep discharge events. That points to (car) charge and discharge behavior that's at least somewhat problematic, an apparent weak spot in an otherwise great car.

Food for thought. Good luck.
 

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I feel the OEM battery is barely adequate
The problem is they are a basic lead acid battery, which isn't really designed for the sort of charge/discharge cycle that PHEVs use. They don't have alternators like standard ICE cars, so they are not maintained at a optimum voltage like they prefer. Manufacturers should really install deep cycle batteries, but they don't to save costs.
 

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I replaced my 12v battery last October at the dealer for $222 (battery & labor). Our Kia Niro PHEV is a great car equipped with long lasting tires, brakes, spark plugs and exhaust systems. I never had a voltmeter prior to owning the Niro PHEV, but using it to check the battery status is part of my bi-monthly routine maintenance checks.That and making certain I never leave an interior light on or not completely close the rear hatch. With the 12v battery, Kia just wanted to ensure we'd never get too complacent with our ownership experience.
 

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2022 Niro PHEV EX Deep Cerulean Blue
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The problem is they are a basic lead acid battery, which isn't really designed for the sort of charge/discharge cycle that PHEVs use. They don't have alternators like standard ICE cars, so they are not maintained at a optimum voltage like they prefer. Manufacturers should really install deep cycle batteries, but they don't to save costs.
How do deep cycle batteries do with the non alternator charging system?

The relatively short battery life of the OEMs is unsettling. The 12V battery in my old 2009 Camry Hybrid went south last spring--after 13 years of service! Not exactly sure if there is a difference in how the auxiliary battery is charged with the KIA vs Toyota hybrid systems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies (and especially correcting the 12v in the title). The dealers in my area I checked with (San Francisco Bay Area) so far said they don't have one in stock and show it backordered. My dealer's parts department said they could even get me a price.. I think I am going to have to figure out how to remove it and try taking it to some parts shops, I guess. Lucky I have another car, I suppose. I can't even jump the Kia because it has 0 volts across the 12v in back. Literally no lights or door locks. I had to use the manual key and then climb in the back to manually open the rear hatch.

I can probably find it easy enough online, but if anyone has instructions or tips on how to properly remove it, I would appreciate it. I already broke the clear plastic 150amp fuse cover while attempted to inspect that. The battery does have a handle that folds up and I tried lifting it, but it must be secured somewhere I can't easily see.

As an aside I am not real happy with Kia or Hyundai anymore. I had a Hyundai Tuscan with dual clutch transmission that was a dangerous nightmare before this Niro and my wife has a white Hyundai Elantra with peeling paint. I have seen no less than six other white Elantras around town with the exact same issue and Hyundai will do nothing about it. Check this out if you want to feel my pain on that, lol: https://topclassactions.com/lawsuit...i-class-action-filed-over-peeling-auto-paint/
There was a lawsuit about it, but it went in Hyundai's favor so they will do nothing.

Thanks all.
 

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How do deep cycle batteries do with the non alternator charging system?

The relatively short battery life of the OEMs is unsettling. The 12V battery in my old 2009 Camry Hybrid went south last spring--after 13 years of service! Not exactly sure if there is a difference in how the auxiliary battery is charged with the KIA vs Toyota hybrid systems.
A deep cycle battery simply better withstands deep discharge events. It doesn't give up much high-current performance, though usually costs more for the added tech. Our cars don't - or under normal conditions, shouldn't - make discharge demands like an ICE starter motor anyway. Nice article: Deep Cycle Battery, Everything You Need to Know - Power Sonic
 

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@dblackfl Thank you for the link! Do you know what charging methodology our PHEVs have? Would be good if it was one that worked well with the deep cycle batteries.
You're welcome. On the methodology I don't have enough data yet to say for sure, yet am certain it's not something that would e.g. harm an AGM battery. It looks like a relatively low-current, perhaps 2A, trickle charge - just like attaching a small charger, and not a "smart" one. That's while the HV battery charges, the only time I've so far observed it. At least among lead-based flooded, gel and AGM types, that's completely safe.

You'll also see lithium-based batteries for similar applications. Those do need a different charging profile/management. For compatibility that's why you see the "BMS" - battery management system on board the battery itself. Very important so they don't blow up. ;) Here's a random example - also note prices: https://www.amazon.com/LiFePO4-Automobile-Battery-Lithium-Phosphate/dp/B082FHK883?th=1

That said, if I was more up on them, I might have replaced my 12V battery with a compatible lithium type. The self-discharge rate and cycle counts are far superior to lead. They also weigh less for the same capacity. What I'm not sure of is how proven/mature they are at this time.
 

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Well mine died and I can't even jump start right now. I called around and searched online and no one has them and some say discontinued. I think this is the correct part number.

Battery - Kia (37110-G5510)

I am planning to pull it out and take it to some stores to see if I can find an equivalent or get it rebuilt. Is this what I have to do? Any idea where to get a new replacement?

So frustrating and even worse because I have been lurking this forum and should have known this would happen. I was planning on taking it to the dealer's shop and try making them replace it for free based on this NHTSA bulletin, but now I just need a new one or to get it rebuilt so I can drive..
You should be able to boost but certainly you will need a new battery.
 

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Do you know what charging methodology our PHEVs have?
In simple terms (because I don't know the details :ROFLMAO:) the car has a DC-DC converter that uses the traction battery to keep the 12v battery charged. It kicks in at some predetermined voltage level, but for some unknown (to us) reason they let it go too low for long battery life. And unfortunately, it's not just Kia that does this. Many other brands of PHEVs do the same thing, with similar short 12v battery life. Perhaps it's to reduce the impact on the much more expensive traction battery.
 
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Negatory. Can confirm first hand that this car will not jump if the 12v is completely dead. Maybe if I charged or hooked a charger to the 12v, but I don't have one.
If the battery is below 3V, you may have to "force" the booster connection. Forcing the boost disables the polarity protection.
If you were to use another vehicle to "jump" that should work fine because in essence, you are adding the 2nd battery in parallel.
 

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2019 White PHEV EX Prem, Mich Premier AS tires, LED BU lights, window visors 2022 Subaru OB Touring
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I had mine replaced under warranty about 10 months ago, same battery as OEM. Interestingly I left one of the LED map lights on for over 24 hrs and was surprised that the car started right up.
For our PHEVs the cranking power is not a big concern because it doesn't turn over the engine. The concern in the reserve capacity for when accessories or lights are left on. When looking for a replacement I found that OEM specs are Cold crank 410A, reserve 80 mins. The 3 potential replacements I found all had higher cranking power but surprisingly the same reserved capacity. So question the value of a "more powerful" battery being the cure for leaving accessories on. :unsure:
 

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I had mine replaced under warranty about 10 months ago, same battery as OEM. Interestingly I left one of the LED map lights on for over 24 hrs and was surprised that the car started right up.
LED certainly does not take much power but if you had done that with a 3 yr old battery in a PHEV, it might have been a different outcome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Just to close this up:

A 6" socket extension is pretty helpful to get the battery clamp off (the one at the bottom of the battery securing it to the body of the car). Then after realizing I could not get the battery out I removed the cargo tray and popped off a plastic panel on the side of the battery to make room to get it out.

I took the battery to an AutoZone near me and they confirmed it was dead and offered to charge it. I decided to just get a new one instead of risking it working for a short while and draining again. They were helpful and said they would remove and install, but since I couldn't drive the car there...

$234.45 for an H4 battery out the door (after $22 for leaving the old one) with close, but not exactly the same CCA and CA specs.

While installing it and tightening the positive terminal clamp my wrench touched some metal and threw a spark. I thought I really screwed up, but it was fine. I should have known better, but was getting irritable and moving fast to get it done.

I wonder if Kia has remedied this situation with new models. I was kind of interested in the new PHEV because it has three things I really wanted and could not get in 2018- automatic hatchback, stop and start cruise follow and a sunroof. It's disappointing that it was not designed to avoid this problem or at the least to give some warning/indication the battery is getting low before getting to this point.

I also wonder if the parasitic draw per the NHTSA bulletin is the reason mine and apparently a lot of other people's batteries are dying around 3-4 years out?

FAIR WARNING to anyone else that is lurking and wondering if their Niro will have this problem. Get a charger or new battery BEFORE you get stuck like I did. I would suggest printing the NHTSA bulletin, showing it to the service department and asking for a new battery as I was planning, but didn't get around to in time.

Thanks all.
 

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While installing it and tightening the positive terminal clamp my wrench touched some metal and threw a spark. I thought I really screwed up, but it was fine. I should have known better, but was getting irritable and moving fast to get it done.
Glad nothing was "smoked" by that action. That is the reason why the negative cable is always removed 1st and replaced last.
 
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