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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just picked up a Niro EV Sunday, here in Oregon. Did an EA charge in Eugene, coming from Portland, to arrive about 1 hour further south, to home. I'm wondering if I can just simply install a 220/50A receptacle with appropriate outlet configuration, use a 220v EV hookup cable, plug in and use the UVO scheduling/monitoring/level app setting to level 2 charge at home? I plan on having a 'time' schedule with Pacific Power, where the rates for 'off peak' are .01 cents KWh, and I believe the UVO app can also handle that 'off peak' scheduling.

Seems that ought to work pretty straightforward, but I'm thinking I am missing something very basic. The app seems to replace the 'intelligent' portion of 'intelligent' EV setups, so why pay for something I may not need?

Thank you.
 

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I really do not understand what you are asking.

The KIA Access app (that is what you should be using) will setup the charge schedule, no matter what charger is hooked to the car..

what is the "why pay for something I may not need?"
 

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The EVSE that comes with the car is designed for 120v. That said, many people have used it on 240v successfully. Personally, I'd get an EVSE designed for 240v, connect it to the proper outlet in your garage, and leave the factory EVSE in the trunk in case you need it somewhere. The Niro EV has a 32 amp on-board charger, and while you can connect a higher powered unit, it won't draw any more than 32 amps. I use a 40 amp Juice Box on my PHEV, and it only draws 16 amps.

The charge scheduler in the car (and on the app) doesn't have the ability to enter off-peak preferred charging times. But you can schedule your charge and make it fall within the off-peak timeframe. For a penny a kW, I'd make the effort.
 

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Maybe you are thinking about a JUICEBOX which can be programmed to feed power and different levels?
Don't bother, just use the app charging schedule ability, works great.
 

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The EVSE that comes with the car is designed for 120v. That said, many people have used it on 240v successfully. Personally, I'd get an EVSE designed for 240v, connect it to the proper outlet in your garage, and leave the factory EVSE in the trunk in case you need it somewhere. The Niro EV has a 32 amp on-board charger, and while you can connect a higher powered unit, it won't draw any more than 32 amps. I use a 40 amp Juice Box on my PHEV, and it only draws 16 amps.

The charge scheduler in the car (and on the app) doesn't have the ability to enter off-peak preferred charging times. But you can schedule your charge and make it fall within the off-peak timeframe. For a penny a kW, I'd make the effort.
How can I convert everything to plug into dryer outlet. I have hot water.heater in garage, thatbi could use. Already has 40 amp circuit.
 

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How can I convert everything to plug into dryer outlet. I have hot water.heater in garage, thatbi could use. Already has 40 amp circuit.
What I did was buy a new 220V Charger with a Plug and covert the dryer outlet to that plug.
Of course this does require a little Electrical wiring knowledge.

You can also buy a 220V Charger without a cord and put a Dryer plug on the end of it.
Either works.
 

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What I did was buy a new 220V Charger with a Plug and covert the dryer outlet to that plug.
Of course this does require a little Electrical wiring knowledge.

You can also buy a 220V Charger without a cord and put a Dryer plug on the end of it.
Either works.
I want to convert factory EVSE TO 24O VOLTS 4O amp circuit, with dryer plug,
 

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I have about the same setup you’re asking about: Niro EV, with a Juicebox L2 EVSE plugged into a 240 V, 40 A drier receptacle in the garage. I set the charging to come on at 10:00 PM, to take advantage of an Edison metered rate.

Since the wires and breaker are rated at 40 A, I set the Juicebox to max at a safe 32 A. I’ve been happy with this setup for years (Leased a Soul EV before this, and the Juicebox was from their original Kickstarter program).

It’s very unlikely that the factory L1 EVSE can be cost effectively converted to L2 The reason for this is that low amp L1 cables are much less expensive than L2 rated cables, so I’m guessing that the factory EVSE cable can’t handle more than about 20 A.
 

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How can I convert everything to plug into dryer outlet. I have hot water.heater in garage, thatbi could use. Already has 40 amp circuit.
Most dryer outlets are 50 amps, so be sure to check it. I believe they all use the NEMA 14-50 outlet, and most EVSEs can be purchased with that plug.

If you get a 40 amp EVSE, it needs to be on a 50 amp circuit. You can use a 32 amp EVSE on a 40 amp circuit. Just make sure you're only using the circuit for a single use. You can't use a hot water heater circuit to feed the heater and an EVSE at the same time. I'm pretty sure the code requires a single outlet on a circuit above a certain size, so it's not like you could legally add a second outlet to the water heater circuit. Certainly not safely. Now if your dryer is located in the garage, there's nothing wrong with unplugging the dryer and plugging the EVSE into the same outlet. You still only have a single device connected to the outlet. But that's a lot of effort, and a risk of shock if you don't trip the breaker first.
 

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It’s very unlikely that the factory L1 EVSE can be cost effectively converted to L2 The reason for this is that low amp L1 cables are much less expensive than L2 rated cables, so I’m guessing that the factory EVSE cable can’t handle more than about 20 A.
Actually, the factory EVSE is only 12 amps maximum. Even if you double the voltage, it's still only going to send 12 amps out the wires. No safety issue there. But since the EV can accept around 32 amps, using the factory EVSE at 240 volts is still going to charge far, far slower than a "real" Level 2 EVSE.
 

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I have about the same setup you’re asking about: Niro EV, with a Juicebox L2 EVSE plugged into a 240 V, 40 A drier receptacle in the garage. I set the charging to come on at 10:00 PM, to take advantage of an Edison metered rate.

Since the wires and breaker are rated at 40 A, I set the Juicebox to max at a safe 32 A. I’ve been happy with this setup for years (Leased a Soul EV before this, and the Juicebox was from their original Kickstarter program).

It’s very unlikely that the factory L1 EVSE can be cost effectively converted to L2 The reason for this is that low amp L1 cables are much less expensive than L2 rated cables, so I’m guessing that the factory EVSE cable can’t handle more than about 20 A.
If cables are limited, probably still 2 to 3 times faster than L1
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, let's see if I can rephrase the question better. I was hoping to do without purchasing something like a Charge Point 240v setup by:

1) using a direct 240v/40A receptacle plug, to
2) plugin a standard charging cable into the 240v box
2) and just using the UVO app for the smart portion
3) and the Kia's internal charger engineering

That way no need for a ChargePoint type of gadget.
 

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Well, let's see if I can rephrase the question better. I was hoping to do without purchasing something like a Charge Point 240v setup by:

1) using a direct 240v/40A receptacle plug, to
2) plugin a standard charging cable into the 240v box
2) and just using the UVO app for the smart portion
3) and the Kia's internal charger engineering

That way no need for a ChargePoint type of gadget.
1. You can convert the standard Level 1 EVSE to a limited Level 2 version by wiring it for 240V operation. Here's a thread about it for the Niro EVSE
2. As @atc98092 said you will be limited to 12A @ 240VAC so just 2.9kW compared to a "true" Level 2 charger at around 7.7kW. This is the internal current limit for the Kia EVSE
3. If you leave the stock NEMA 5-15 connector and cable on the EVSE you will be technically running those parts above their wattage rating. Problem? Probably not. Warranty? Gone.

If you're cool with all of that, rock on. It won't be a true 30A Level 2 charger but if you are mostly charging overnight, that's probably ok.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'm not understanding something. Using a dedicated 240v/40A (it's actually 50A breakers), w/a 14-50 receptacle. Wouldn't the Niro handle that at its max charging capacity? I think I was told 240 is the newer 220. The circuit is on 6 gage wire on the 50A breakers.
 

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I'm not understanding something. Using a dedicated 240v/40A (it's actually 50A breakers), w/a 14-50 receptacle. Wouldn't the Niro handle that at its max charging capacity? I think I was told 240 is the newer 220. The circuit is on 6 gage wire on the 50A breakers.
No, the current limit is set by the EVSE not the car or the circuit you plug it in to. The max current for the OEM cable is 12A regardless of the voltage. So if you connect it to a 40A circuit it will still only draw 12A. If you want more than that you'll have to buy a higher capacity charger.
 

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Maybe another way to explain, from the thing you plug into the car (the plug we would call it, cable would refer to the wires) the car can determine Level 1, Level 2, DC high voltage.

The car will only draw a max 12 amps is what is being stated. Of course drawing 12 amps at 240 volts is different than drawing 12 amps at 110.

In the USA, where we have 110v utility outlets, you can get faster charging if you can take the L1 "charger" and connect it to 240v in some cases.

This was the case with my Fiat 500e EV, so you got a faster charge if you fed the 110v "charger" with 240... not approved by Fiat, but many people had success.

So if your supplied L1 charger can handle 240v and you connect 240v to it, then it should charge the car faster than on 110v, but this all ASSUMES that the car itself, where the "charger" really resides, does indeed allow 12 amps at 240v

Greg
 
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