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Discussion Starter #61
Nice job my man. Not many fans on here because its an energy saving crowd but I'm with you. I've had a sub since I was 15 and I'm 44 now.
We both have been in car audio for a very similar amount of time!

I got into it when I was 14 when my older brother got his first car and I’m 43 now!
 

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Discussion Starter #62
Read this article and it tells you exactly how to measure output power with an AC volt meter. All of my tests were at 40 hz.

http://rftech.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/468/~/measuring-amplifier-output-power


What this does not tell you is the distortion level. I do know from a YouTube video that a guy made where he tested the amp I have on an amplifier dyno is the amp is capable of roughly 600 watts continuous at less than 1% THD.

So, by setting the gain so the amp is putting out about 500 watts then I know the amp is not clipping. My maximum volume on the stock radio is 34. This is approximately 75% of max volume which typically is the highest you want to turn the volume up. It is more or less an industry setting if you have no means of putting an O scope on the speaker level outputs on the stock radio.


I’m not an electrical engineer but I have been around the block a few times.
 

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We both have been in car audio for a very similar amount of time!

I got into it when I was 14 when my older brother got his first car and I’m 43 now!
Yes sir I was building boxes and putting in radios and amps for everyone in the neighborhood at about 14-15ish. Just buy me the supplies and I did it for free because I've always loved doing that stuff. Now I can buy a single sub box ready for mount for like $30. lol
 

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Got the amp mostly wired up today. The power is connected to the 12v+ connection beside the hybrid battery. An in-line 40 amp fuse was used and 8 gauge wire was ran for the power and ground. A Micro2 fuse tap was used so I could get a switched power connection from the fuse box and use it as a remote turn on for the amp.



Would you be able to post pics of the power connection and ground? thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #66
I have mine hooked up in the same way, and I too have had zero problems with it connected in this way. For the ground I used a stud under the back seat on the passenger side.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
After many months of having the sub running flawlessly under the drivers seat I have decided that it is time for an upgrade to a better subwoofer.

The 10” Cadence subwoofer has exceeded my expectations in every way, and it being $50 is just icing on the cake. I am amazed that I have been pushing just over 500 watts RMS to this subwoofer(which is double its RMS power rating) and it has done nothing but take it. So now it is time for a better subwoofer that has more output, better power handling, and is in general a better made subwoofer.


So which subwoofer to get is the question that I have been pondering. Originally I wanted a new Sundown shallow mount subwoofer, but after talking to them they more or less told me that they have nothing that will work in such a small box. JL Audio has a nice shallow mount subwoofer, but it is designed for clarity and can’t take 500 watts RMS without risking damage. Kicker has one that is decent and is close to a good match but I found one better.

NVX VCW 104 is the sub. 10” high excursion(20 mm of linear xmax) dual 2 1/2” voice coils that are 4 ohms each. So when will I get this one in? I’m not quit sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #69
Here is the 1 year update.

Yes, it has been about a year since I got this sub up and running. The box has held up really good. There is a very small air leak, but it is not noticeable. The subwoofer is holding up LOTS better than expected. Keep in mind, this Cadence 10” subwoofer only cost $50 and was only meant to test out the idea to see if it was worth investing more into it.

A few months ago I thought that the sub had sustained some damage from too much power. At higher volumes it sounded like there was some coil rub going on. However, after removing the box from the car I found something curious. The subwoofer in fact was not damaged. Come to find out, the last time that my wife drove my car, she lowered the seat which was making the surround rub on the seat. Once I raised the seat back up, the sound disappeared!!

Speaking of sound, it continues to surprise everyone that hears it. Due to the close proximity to the driver of the vehicle, it is a very visceral experience. I have sat in vehicles that meter at over 155 dB and the physical experience is very similar, except to your ears. When the volume is cranked up, you can feel the bass all over your body. You can feel your pants fluttering against your legs, and the rear view mirrors(yes, plural) are almost useless due to the extreme vibration. But it does not sound like a 155+ dB vehicle. I’m guessing the actual dB output at max volume to be around the 125-130 dB area. One day it will get metered, I just don’t know when.


Eventually, I will update the subwoofer to a better built, higher power handling subwoofer. The NVX VCW 10” to be specific. The amplifier will probably remain as it continues to run flawlessly putting out just over 500 watts into the current 2 ohm subwoofer.


So all in all, it has been working VERY good all the while taking up zero cargo space. It is also nice that it only takes about 10 minutes to remove it from the car. Once removed, it allows full movement to be restored back to the driver seat, which is normally not needed so it does not get removed very much.

So here is a video showing how the sub has held up.

 

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dB meters are a common phone app - I use mine a lot. Don't think they will go to 155 dB though, that's insane. I use SPL meter app for iPhone, maxes out at 140. Not sure the phone mic is accurate at that kind of level or if it really matters.

Just found a fun quote:

At very close range, the sound from the Saturn V measures an incredible 220 db, loud enough to melt concrete just from the sound.

At 500 meters, 155 db you would experience painful, violent shaking in your entire body, you would feel compressed, as though deep underwater. Your vision would blur, breathing would be very difficult, your eardrums are obviously a lost cause, even with advanced active noise cancelling protection you could experience permanent damage. This is the sort of sound level aircraft mechanics sometimes experience for short periods of time. Almost twice as “loud” as putting your ear up to the exhaust of a formula 1 car. The air temperature would drop significantly, perhaps 10-25 degrees F, becoming suddenly cold because of the air being so violently stretched and moved.
 

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Discussion Starter #71
Actually, low bass frequencies are not as hard on your ears as higher frequencies are. The frequency really plays a big part in how it effects you. Low frequencies around 30 hz at well over 160 dB are uncomfortable, but typically are not seriously painful. When you get into the higher notes though of around 65 hz, 160 dB can be very painful to your body and it can be difficult to breath. The last time I checked, about 182 dB is the current world record for a car stereo system. To put it into perspective, in 1995 the world record was 154 dB!!

I’ll have to check that app out. Thanks!!
 
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