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Discussion Starter #1
If the car in front of me stops, adaptive cruise will bring me to a stop, but after a second or so, it releases the brake and will rear-end the car ahead at idle speed. I assume this is a feature and not a bug. A huge safety oversight by Kia. Other cars I am familiar with don’t do this and at least several other Kia models will keep the car stopped. Comments?
 

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It is a "feature": the adaptive cruise only works down to 9 km/h. In some car models/makes it works down to zero, in others it doesn't. In manual transmission cars it is even worse - RPM-limited, so for example it certainly won't brake below 40 km/h or so if you are in the highest gear.
 

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If the car in front of me stops, adaptive cruise will bring me to a stop, but after a second or so, it releases the brake and will rear-end the car ahead at idle speed. I assume this is a feature and not a bug. A huge safety oversight by Kia. Other cars I am familiar with don’t do this and at least several other Kia models will keep the car stopped. Comments?
That’s like asking “If I pull into my garage and stop, why is it that I can’t leave the car running, and in gear, and get out and not have it hit a wall?”
 

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If the car in front of me stops, adaptive cruise will bring me to a stop, but after a second or so, it releases the brake and will rear-end the car ahead at idle speed. I assume this is a feature and not a bug. A huge safety oversight by Kia. Other cars I am familiar with don’t do this and at least several other Kia models will keep the car stopped. Comments?
Depends on your viewpoint. I'd say expecting the car to keep you stopped is a huge oversight by the driver. Especially since the cruise control only works down to about 5 MPH, and then notifies you in the dash that it disabled itself. What was bringing you to a stop was probably the Automated Emergency Braking system. And I don't think that system holds pressure on the brake pedal afer stopping.
 

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Depends on your viewpoint. I'd say expecting the car to keep you stopped is a huge oversight by the driver. Especially since the cruise control only works down to about 5 MPH, and then notifies you in the dash that it disabled itself. What was bringing you to a stop was probably the Automated Emergency Braking system. And I don't think that system holds pressure on the brake pedal afer stopping.
Or you could actually...you know...DRIVE!!!!
I'm not sure of the reasons for the sarcastic comments. These responses seem to be missing the point. Other cars have adaptive cruise controls that can bring them to a full stop in traffic, and then resume. The Niro slows down to a few miles per hour, then cuts out, which is odd behavior, and annoying. This is not a driver oversight, this is just a bad design, or perhaps a limitation due to the DCT transmission used.

No reason has been given by Kia for this behavior. I think it's a bug. This is not AEB we are talking about, its adaptive cruise control. The Niro doesn't stop when the car in front stops at a light. It slows, then ACC braking cuts out. No one's talking about not paying attention and not DRIVING!!! We're talking about a feature that's not implemented in a same common-sense fashion that it is implemented in many other cars.
 

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I'm not sure of the reasons for the sarcastic comments. These responses seem to be missing the point. Other cars have adaptive cruise controls that can bring them to a full stop in traffic, and then resume. The Niro slows down to a few miles per hour, then cuts out, which is odd behavior, and annoying. This is not a driver oversight, this is just a bad design, or perhaps a limitation due to the DCT transmission used.

No reason has been given by Kia for this behavior. I think it's a bug. This is not AEB we are talking about, its adaptive cruise control. The Niro doesn't stop when the car in front stops at a light. It slows, then ACC braking cuts out. No one's talking about not paying attention and not DRIVING!!! We're talking about a feature that's not implemented in a same common-sense fashion that it is implemented in many other cars.
It's not sarcasm. Not only does the car cut out at about 5 MPH, it pops up a message in the dash and sounds a tone alerting the driver that it has cut out. The OP in this case, being under the impression that the Adaptice Cruise stopped him and then let go of the brake, clearly missed that notification, and also clearly did not read the manual regarding the system in the first place. Those two elements are driver oversight by definition. If you don't notice the message that the ACC system disabled itself, and if you don't notice the chime calling your attention to the message, then you're not paying attention.

All of these adaptive cruise and emergency braking systems work differently right now. There's no real industry standard. Subaru's is so short range their AEB system still can't completely stop you at certain speeds. Toyota uses completly different iconography for their ACC controls. You have to read the manual with these things to understand how they work, they're not at the PRNDL level yet.
 

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It's not sarcasm. Not only does the car cut out at about 5 MPH, it pops up a message in the dash and sounds a tone alerting the driver that it has cut out. The OP in this case, being under the impression that the Adaptice Cruise stopped him and then let go of the brake, clearly missed that notification, and also clearly did not read the manual regarding the system in the first place. Those two elements are driver oversight by definition. If you don't notice the message that the ACC system disabled itself, and if you don't notice the chime calling your attention to the message, then you're not paying attention.

All of these adaptive cruise and emergency braking systems work differently right now. There's no real industry standard. Subaru's is so short range their AEB system still can't completely stop you at certain speeds. Toyota uses completly different iconography for their ACC controls. You have to read the manual with these things to understand how they work, they're not at the PRNDL level yet.
I believe you misread the OP. He's clearly describing the behavior of ACC, one which I have encountered many times . He did not let go of the brake, he did not disregard the notification. He did not engage AEB. He did not "rear-end" anyone. He's just wondering why the system doesn't work the way it seems like it should, and then describing what would happen if you don't take over braking.

Saying it "works differently" is not really an explanation, it's just an excuse for a system that's not as useful as some other ones, including ones in other Kia models. Blaming driver oversight is unwarranted for someone simply asking a question.

It's conceivable that I misread the post, since it is worded a bit oddly, and that he actually did disregard all the messages and AEB activated, but that's reading a lot into it. Maybe OP will "chime" in and clarify.
 

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I believe you misread the OP. He's clearly describing the behavior of ACC, one which I have encountered many times . He did not let go of the brake, he did not disregard the notification. He did not engage AEB. He did not "rear-end" anyone. He's just wondering why the system doesn't work the way it seems like it should, and then describing what would happen if you don't take over braking.

Saying it "works differently" is not really an explanation, it's just an excuse for a system that's not as useful as some other ones, including ones in other Kia models. Blaming driver oversight is unwarranted for someone simply asking a question.

It's conceivable that I misread the post, since it is worded a bit oddly, and that he actually did disregard all the messages and AEB activated, but that's reading a lot into it. Maybe OP will "chime" in and clarify.
AEB engages automatically. If the car brought him to a complete stop, it is by definition not the Adaptive Cruise system, because that cuts out at 5 MPH and does not come back on automatically. It pops up a message in the dash when it does so. Happened to me tons of times while using the Niro's ACC in traffic. It's very hard to miss. Missing it would be driver oversight. Not reading the manual is also driver oversight. As I said, it's not like not being familiar with a PRNDL shifter, which is standardized across the industry right now. ACC systems are unique per-manufacturer, and sometimes even per-vehicle. Expecting it to work like any other car from any other manufacturer is not an excuse for not being familiar with your car's unique system. Sorry, but that's just how it is.
 

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I'm not sure of the reasons for the sarcastic comments. These responses seem to be missing the point. Other cars have adaptive cruise controls that can bring them to a full stop in traffic, and then resume. The Niro slows down to a few miles per hour, then cuts out, which is odd behavior, and annoying. This is not a driver oversight, this is just a bad design, or perhaps a limitation due to the DCT transmission used.

No reason has been given by Kia for this behavior. I think it's a bug. This is not AEB we are talking about, its adaptive cruise control. The Niro doesn't stop when the car in front stops at a light. It slows, then ACC braking cuts out. No one's talking about not paying attention and not DRIVING!!! We're talking about a feature that's not implemented in a same common-sense fashion that it is implemented in many other cars.
My sarcastic comment is intended to show the absolute insanity that some people show when faced with technology.

It is there to HELP...not to take the huge responsibility of driving out of your life.

You alone are responsible for the 3000 pound missle that you are wrapped up in, not the computer.

Font expect the car to think...thats your job.
 

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My sarcastic comment is intended to show the absolute insanity that some people show when faced with technology.

It is there to HELP...not to take the huge responsibility of driving out of your life.

You alone are responsible for the 3000 pound missle that you are wrapped up in, not the computer.

Font expect the car to think...thats your job.

So why be sarcastic? I can get that on Facebook. This is supposed to be a helpful forum, not one to ridicule people asking questions.

Asking why the Niro's ACC doesn't have the same features that other cars do is a legitimate question, not insanity. Maybe someone here knows the answer, or maybe Kia monitors this forum. It would be nice to know the reason why.

No one is claiming that you shouldn't take responsibility for driving.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have several cars with advanced driving features and I always make sure I know the limitations of each. And, I drive assuming I am in full control at all times with the exception of the Tesla that can pull in and out of my garage without my being in it.

However, I seriously doubt that YOU explain the limitations of a car whenever you let someone else drive it. BTW, all of my other cars with ACC/AEB, the car will remain stopped if I take my foot off the brake. The Niro does a fairly good job of stopping itself (a little too abrupt for my tastes) so why can’t it remain stopped by itself? My salesman thought it would and was surprised when the Niro wouldn’t do this during his demonstration.

Regarding the Kia owners manual, I can understand why most people don’t read it. It is generally poorly written. Not that this is unique to Kia as I have some very expensive vehicles that are MUCH worse.

Finally, I am not bashing Kia. My Niro PHEV is my daily driver. No range anxiety or wasting time at a Supercharger. The build quality is the best, especially considering its low price.
 

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In the Tesla, you have a crawl option. Turn it on, and behavior will be similar to the Niro under some circumstances.
 

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As a direct comparison, Cadillac's ACC in the CTS models will bring you to a complete stop and hold you there without you ever touching the pedals. It does require you to touch the gas pedal to continue moving forward, but then the ACC resumes.

The Niro's system doesn't work that way, that's all. It's not a bug, it's just programmed differently. As to why it doesn't bring you to a full stop, who knows. Maybe it has to do with the DCT, maybe it's something else, I'm sure they have some reason for it. But yes it does require you to pay attention because when it cuts out the car will continue moving forward on its own.
 

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In my 2018 Niro Touring, ACC will only bring the car down to just under 10 mph. Stopping completely requires the driver to step on the brake. To re-engage ACC, the car must be travelling at least 20 mph. I love everything else about the car but wish it had the same "eye sight" system as my previous Subaru.
 

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I love my Niro's ACC and AEB. I really appreciate these features for what they are, driving aids. For anyone buying and using these features you should be aware of their limitations.

ACC can and will bring you to a full stop if traffic stops suddenly. It's happened to me only 2 times, but whether ACC or AEB has to bring me to a stop, I always take control. You'd be a irresponsible driver if you didn't.
 
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