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I was comparing both weathertech and maxline for Niro application and I have ended with weathertech for cargo and maxline for front two rows. I have been a weathertech user for a long time, but for Niro passenger front there is a hump and it’s cut out instead of covering it like maxline to completely cover the floor. overall quality of fit and materiel seems to be on par with the weathertech.
 

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sightland I have exactly the same set up as you. As of last week I received the maxliner floor mats for the Niro and the Weathertech cargo mat for the Niro. Maxliner did not have the cargo liner for the PHEV Niro. Both fit very well. I was surprised how well the Maxliner floor mats fit, these really are exact fits. The Weather tech cargo cargo liner is also an exact fit.

I would post pictures but I am still trying to figure out how to make thumbnails on my computer to insert them into my post.
 

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sightland I have exactly the same set up as you. As of last week I received the maxliner floor mats for the Niro and the Weathertech cargo mat for the Niro.

weathertech cargo cover have separate shape around where the tie-down hook goes. One other user here had completely cutout the inner shape but I only made a small cut enough to expose the bracket so it’s easy enough to flip up when needed without over-exposing the carpeted area. Weathertech cargo cover in that regard better than the maxline because maxline doesn’t have the separated and raised shape and cutting the corners will lessen the protection as they are level with rest of the cover. Maxline like weathertech, my car set out on the sun for many hours and no plastic/toxic smell so I will have to consider maxline in the future if am in the market for all weather mat.
 

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Tuxmats mats do a single piece for the back seat that molds over the hump. The biggest difference is that the liner runs up the back seat to cover the carpet there. Great for those that have kids whose shoes would hit the carpet, or pets.
 

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Tuxmats mats do a single piece for the back seat that molds over the hump. The biggest difference is that the liner runs up the back seat to cover the carpet there. Great for those that have kids whose shoes would hit the carpet, or pets.

maxline also extends further inside as shown. I also looked at Tuxmat which looked good but i didn't like the "higher" bump tracks. when step-on, does the 'bump" crushes flat and restore it's shape afterwards?
 

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does the 'bump" crushes flat and restore it's shape afterwards?

The tuxmat "bump"/channels do not crush flat. The channels bothered my right foot for a week as I went from gas to brakes. It felt like it was catching my foot. But I've never had an all weather mat before so not sure if I would have had the same issues with the other brands. I'm totally adjusted now and it doesn't bother me anymore.
 

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I use to have WeatherTec floor mats when I owned my old Ford Edge.  They were good but I found them to be rather flawed for the following reasons:


1. They didn't protect the sides at all. I live in Canada where there is snow and that means quite a bit of salt as it seems nobody wants to be accused of someone slipping ad falling. Sometimes you can get more salt on the ground than there ever was snow. So when you climb into your car the wet from the bottom of your shoes/boots will drip onto every surface. That means anything that is not covered will get wet. Wet with a salty concentration. If it really cold, then you bring the snow/salt and put it onto the car mat. But you heat your car up and then the snow melts and you end up with a pool of salty badness at the bottom of the mat. This will splash around and get on the sides as you move your feet.
2. They hook in very well, but sadly that makes taking them out to be a bit of a pain. Shouldn't really be a big deal except for the problem with they fill up really well. All fine but in the middle of winter, how do you empty them? You can't pull them out to dump them as you will spill all that salty badness all over the carpet inside that you took to much effort to protect.
3. They are very hard so they don't tend to conform very well to the inside of the car. They are laser fit so they shouldn't need to? Well, not after several years where they tend to start to bend or not conform as you can't glue them into place so they shift ever so slightly and then that makes one side or another not fit right.



I went with Tuxmats.  They seem to fix more of what was wrong. 



1. Very high sides.

2. Clips that hold the high sides in place so they don't fold inwards or out of alignment
3. Softer sides so they have the ability to shift and give a bit when the mat does eventually move


Sure they still have the issue of filling up and I have only concluded that its maybe best of let the car get cold overnight and then you can pick the chunks of frozen slush out of the bottom. (and tuxmat shape does allow for this) to get the main amount out every couple of weeks. Barring that, I invested in a Ridgid wet vac that has a lifetime warranty.  What doesn't come out can be sucked out.
 

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I use to have WeatherTec floor mats when I owned my old Ford Edge.  They were good but I found them to be rather flawed for the following reasons:


1. They didn't protect the sides at all. I live in Canada where there is snow and that means quite a bit of salt as it seems nobody wants to be accused of someone slipping ad falling. Sometimes you can get more salt on the ground than there ever was snow. So when you climb into your car the wet from the bottom of your shoes/boots will drip onto every surface. That means anything that is not covered will get wet. Wet with a salty concentration. If it really cold, then you bring the snow/salt and put it onto the car mat. But you heat your car up and then the snow melts and you end up with a pool of salty badness at the bottom of the mat. This will splash around and get on the sides as you move your feet.
2. They hook in very well, but sadly that makes taking them out to be a bit of a pain. Shouldn't really be a big deal except for the problem with they fill up really well. All fine but in the middle of winter, how do you empty them? You can't pull them out to dump them as you will spill all that salty badness all over the carpet inside that you took to much effort to protect.
3. They are very hard so they don't tend to conform very well to the inside of the car. They are laser fit so they shouldn't need to? Well, not after several years where they tend to start to bend or not conform as you can't glue them into place so they shift ever so slightly and then that makes one side or another not fit right.



I went with Tuxmats.  They seem to fix more of what was wrong. 



1. Very high sides.

2. Clips that hold the high sides in place so they don't fold inwards or out of alignment
3. Softer sides so they have the ability to shift and give a bit when the mat does eventually move


Sure they still have the issue of filling up and I have only concluded that its maybe best of let the car get cold overnight and then you can pick the chunks of frozen slush out of the bottom. (and tuxmat shape does allow for this) to get the main amount out every couple of weeks. Barring that, I invested in a Ridgid wet vac that has a lifetime warranty.  What doesn't come out can be sucked out.

For all those reasons, I went Tuxmats as well. Spot cleaning is super easy with a damp cloth. After a tough Canadian winter, I pull them out and wash with a pressure washer. Too bad they didn't a cargo mat.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I

1. Very high sides.

2. Clips that hold the high sides in place so they don't fold inwards or out of alignment
3. Softer sides so they have the ability to shift and give a bit when the mat does eventually move

nice, i didn't realize how far it goes up to cover virtually all carpeted surface.
 

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I was comparing both weathertech and maxline for Niro application and I have ended with weathertech for cargo and maxline for front two rows. I have been a weathertech user for a long time, but for Niro passenger front there is a hump and it’s cut out instead of covering it like maxline to completely cover the floor. overall quality of fit and materiel seems to be on par with the weathertech.
I'm looking for mats that pretty floppy/flexible/silent underfoot vs ones that are stiff & noisy. I prefer a more of a rubbery type of mat rather than a stiff milk carton form. Which of the 3 three products in this discussion would best suit my picayune tastes? :D
 

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I'm looking for mats that pretty floppy/flexible/silent underfoot vs ones that are stiff & noisy. I prefer a more of a rubbery type of mat rather than a stiff milk carton form. Which of the 3 three products in this discussion would best suit my picayune tastes? :D
The Tuxmats have some give. There is no sound when you press directly down on them, but they make a plasticy noise if you drag something across them. I made a video but can't figure out how to upload it.
 
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