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It sounds like a silly question, but I'm very curious to know if my car runs out of gas, will I still be able to drive it for a short time on battery alone? I've looked through the Encyclopedia Britannica owner's manual for information on the subject but have yet to find it. Anyone know?

thanks in advance.
 

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Yes, you can. The car goes into a limp mode and limits your speed severely. Depending on current state of charge, you should have several miles at a low speed. I've not experienced it, but I did try really hard once to run completely out of gas just to figure out what the tank holds.

On other bit of information you won't find in the manual is that if you top off your tank, your total gas is 12.7 gallons, not the 11.9 rated tank capacity. This gives you an extra 8 tenths of a gallon after your range remaining says zero. I went 50 miles below zero on my last fill!
 

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If you look in the Encyclopedia Britannica you'll find that running out of gas is highly not recommended. Matter of fact you're warned not to let that happen. I don't know exactly what it is that you may damage but it may be the battery pack.
Sounds like a VERY EXPENSIVE EXPERIMENT.
 

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In addition, topping off the tank to the very top can flood the charcoal canister in the Emissions Sys.
Also a very expensive repair.
 

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Never thought of Encyclopedia Britannica for car service information! The danger in running out of gas (which the Encyclopedia apparently lacks) is that if you now deplete the battery under say 20%, you run a risk of battery degradation, similar to what EV owners do when they charge to 100% or discharge under 20%. Affects battery longevity. Not a problem with a single event. What else are you going to do if you run out of fuel? The limp mode is there to help you. If it was a huge problem, the software would brick the car rather than allow it.

Every car on earth can be topped off. How then to prevent damage? A ten cent loop in the vapor recovery system stops any damage. If the emissions systems are damaged, this is a warranty item not borne by the owner, at least in the US. So it is up to the manufacturer to properly design such systems, not on the car owner or gas pump manufacturer to not take advantage of the full tank capacity.
 

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@Hoffman, Very good question that all Niro's HEV and PHEV's has probably asked themself!



you'll find that running out of gas is highly not recommended. Matter of fact you're warned not to let that happen. I don't know exactly what it is that you may damage but it may be the battery pack. Sounds like a VERY EXPENSIVE EXPERIMENT.
This is the most intelligent anwser in this thread so far.! Doing this experiment, is stupid, telling people that it can be done, is more dumber. And if someone gets stuck with problems after this experiment, that person should not drive this kind of car! :|
 

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The question in the thread title is "Can I run out of gas and still drive my Niro?". No one has recommended running out of gas as an experiment. I admit to trying to run out on purpose, but that was only to settle the question of tank capacity and true range.
 

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Outside of any potential battery damage, the main reason it is not recommended to run any car out of gas is because as the gas runs out, the engine begins running very lean. Misfiring/backfiring is possible in that scenario, and that can damage your cat converter, or other emission devices in the exhaust stream. Those can get quite expensive as well. :)
 

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the question asked is rather bad in it likely is not asking the right question, and if taken literally, YES if you drive your Niro and don't fill the tank up, eventually you will run out of gas. What I fear the original poster was actually asking is, "is it safe to run out of gas with my Niro?" and to that questions, the answer is NO. The car will go into Limp mode and there could be additional damage done to your car as the systems are designed to use both GAS and Electric at the same time.
 

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Limp mode cuts out ICE modality so there is no damage from trying to run both at the same time. As the warning on the dash says (for those who haven't seen it), fill up to avoid damaging the hybrid battery. Nothing about damage to the ICE. No other car warns (AFAIK) about damage to ICE for running out of gas.

Most forum posters warning about damage usually cite water and debris at bottom of tank. Damage from misfiring or lean burn is pushing fear for little reason. I've run out of gas, I don't know, maybe a dozen times in fifty years in cars and motorcycles. Zero damage. My PT Cruiser could be a bit hard to start after running out of gas due to difficulty in priming gas lines to the injector. No problems with any other vehicle (mostly carb not injectors). Injector issues are mostly the issues I read about with others that have run out of gas, but only certain vehicles and also related to priming. And that is a convenience problem, not a permanent damage scenario.
 

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My PT Cruiser could be a bit hard to start after running out of gas due to difficulty in priming gas lines to the injector. No problems with any other vehicle (mostly carb not injectors). Injector issues are mostly the issues I read about with others that have run out of gas, but only certain vehicles and also related to priming. And that is a convenience problem, not a permanent damage scenario.

The Niro has a presureized gas system to run direct injection. This could cause trouble if you run out of gas in that the control system istelf might not allow the engine to start even when you put more fuel into the gas tank. An ICE only type vehicle doesn't have all the computer controlled start stop functionality that the hybrid system does. I would hazzard to guess that the sytem will simply stop itself from starting back up without assistance of a computer diagnostic attachment that the average user will never have. This would be done for safety reasons as you have a very high voltage electric system inside the car and if the engine is suddenly without fuel, how does the cars computer know it's just someone forgot to fill the tank, or there is a serious hole somewhere between the tank and the engine that can cause the car to explode as the pump pushes high pressure gas out into an electrically charged car. So you are now stuck having to tow the Niro to a Kia dealership to get them to reset the car after additional gas has been put into the tank.


So when we say damage to the ICE, it will cover the side that it simply won't just restart and might need to have additional work done to the engine at a KIA garage/dealership before you can go on your merry way. Pure speculation on my part, but I doubt they put in that many warnings into the manual just for the fun of it.
 

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Again, the warning specifies hybrid battery damage, not ICE damage. In any case, there are several anecdotes of running out of gas and starting easily on the Ioniq forums (same drivetrain as the Niro). Few people would buy the same brand again if running out of gas required dealership equipment to start.
 

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Again, the warning specifies hybrid battery damage, not ICE damage. In any case, there are several anecdotes of running out of gas and starting easily on the Ioniq forums (same drivetrain as the Niro). Few people would buy the same brand again if running out of gas required dealership equipment to start.
Indeed. Most if not all modern vehicles include lift pumps in the tank to provide positive pressure to the fuel system. Combined with a full flow design that returns unused fuel to the tank you have a system that can quickly purge air from the lines on its own in the case of running out of fuel.

Now, older diesels including VWs that used the injection pump on the engine to pull fuel from the tank? Yeah, don't run empty in those. Once you get air in the injection pump you have to bleed the system manually in order to get it to restart. That sucks.

Pun absolutely intended. :D
 

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Again, it's unlikely the ICE itself would suffer damage by running out of gas. It's the emissions equipment, specifically the cat converter and any sensors in the exhaust path that could be damaged. And it wouldn't be something covered by the warranty. That could get expensive quickly.
 

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The battery and electrical system is the easiest to protect. What have you got. A large battery and a motor. Both of those can easily with very little cost be thermally protected so that they will not opperate above a certain critical temperature. As well the charge capacity of the battery is easily monitored. This is a system that is already there in how else can you get the dials on the dash to work. So again, drop below a certain percent and the logic computers can simply cut off the power. Renerative braking can simply be cutoff. That brings the safety side of the brakes run on electricity to power the brake pressure pump. Yes it does have a mechanical backup, but I think that is not as effective as the full functioning one, so perhaps that plays a roll. So where is the potential for damage going to come from?
 

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Again, it's unlikely the ICE itself would suffer damage by running out of gas. It's the emissions equipment, specifically the cat converter and any sensors in the exhaust path that could be damaged. And it wouldn't be something covered by the warranty. That could get expensive quickly.
I don't see that such damage is likely. You may not be aware that emissions equipment has a long warranty by federal mandate so if it is damaged, the warranty will indeed cover it no fault.
 

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Again, it's unlikely the ICE itself would suffer damage by running out of gas. It's the emissions equipment, specifically the cat converter and any sensors in the exhaust path that could be damaged. And it wouldn't be something covered by the warranty. That could get expensive quickly.
No chance. Otherwise simply shutting off the ICE when you get home would do the same thing. Running out of gas simply results in the engine leaning out until it stalls. This would briefly increase the exhaust temperature but not nearly enough to damage emissions components. Normal operating temp for the catalytic converter is >1200°F, that's WAY above the EGT of any normal ICE. The oxygen sensors are also very tolerant of high temps so no likely harm there either.

I'm not saying running out of gas is a good thing, just that it's not likely to cause any problems beyond inconvenience if you do.
 

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I don't think the emissions warranty is going to cover something caused by running out of fuel. And you're overlooking the potential (not a given, but could happen) of the lean mixture causing misfires. That's what could cause the damage, not temps.
 

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And exactly how long will misfires happen when you run out of gas? Happen to know minimum number of misfires before damage occurs? Even if you tell a dealer you ran out of gas, what do you think a judge will say when you take them to court for breaking a federal law? The judge will say you must drive the car no matter how much pollution you are now emitting? Your arguments are without merit.
 

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Converter damage by misfire is due to non combusted fuel entering the cat. When the miss is due to a lack of fuel, that is not the case. A lean burn is still a burn.
 
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