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Loving my brand new 2019 Niro EV! This being my first EV, I have questions about charging practice -- in particular, to what max level should I charge each night I plug it in? And does it matter if it's trickle or level 2 charging? My salesperson said if you really want to preserve battery life, just go to 80% or so. I'm fine with that since our daily use doesn't come close to that limit, so that's what I do currently. But I'm not finding any documentation to that effect in the owner's manual or anywhere else. I imagine "100%" according to the car is well under the true capacity of the battery, so that you don't overcharge, but I don't know if that makes it reasonable to always charge to 100%. What's the actual manufacturer recommendation?

Thanks!
 

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We don't have an EV so the experience I am relating is with a PHEV and its battery.

We have a 2019 Niro EX PHEV. If it is not being driven then without exception it is plugged in and charging. It is charged to 100% every single day By 100% I mean it is charged every day fully until the battery management system in the car shuts the charging process down. We have a Level 2 charger so the car is fully charged after 2.5 hours but remains plugged in all evening. I trust the on board battery management system to do the job and manage the process for me.

To be honest I wouldn't own a car that I had to try to out think and manage- I want the cars battery management system to do all the thinking and manage itself for the best battery longevity and health.

I might be too trusting. I wonder if you could email KIA customer service with your question and they could forward it to a specialist or engineer to best answer your question about an EV?
 

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The generally accepted value by most all manufacturers for maximum battery life is 80% on a day to day basis. For an occasional trip, there's no problem charging to 100%.
 

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Kia doesn't have any specific recommendations about charge levels that I have seen. But yes, stopping at 80% will lengthen battery life. As to level 1 or 2 charging, that seems somewhat controversial. Kia does discourage level 1 "emergency" charging, but likely that is covering their ass for liability lawsuits when you plug into a home circuit that cannot handle the steady current required: fire hazard. Personally, I doubt there is any difference in battery life between the two, it is only with DC fast charging that the battery is likely to heat up enough to affect battery life. It is possible to adapt the 110 provided charger for 240 volts to save on a dedicated charger set up, but you need to know what you are doing (and could potentially zap your charger). I do know a local owner of a Kona EV (perhaps the only one in Ohio) and he charges off 110 as he doesn't need to go long distance.
 

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Here is an article on Hyundai/KIA EV battery Technology used in the Kona and Niro - very interesting-- you can bet those engineers knew what they were doing. There is even a video showing a cutaway of the actual technology.


If you really like reading about EV's here is another article about how KIA's EV battery supplies are affecting availability of US KIA NIRO EV's - also a peak at a new KIA EV vehicle that is headed to America in the next 1 to 2 years!


Last but not least a scientific study with actual field data on EV Vehicle battery life longevity, I will warn you before reading it is a technical and thorough with real data and one of the conclusions -surprise -surprise-don't sweat the small stuff!

 

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I believe there there’s not much difference between 80 and 90% just as long as you don’t leave it topped off each time. This preserves the battery best. In addition, do not do too many fast charges as that also degrades the battery.
 

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For me, the convenience of plug it in and leave it far outweighs, the small increase in battery degradation over time. After 5 years, I don't think I would notice the difference between my battery being 88% vs 90% of what it was brand new.
 
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