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I have the Niro all-electric (2019) and I want to take it on a camping road trip (on a route that has no fast chargers currently). I want to charge overnight by using an RV hookup at the campground. I have read various forums about Tesla drivers doing this but am finding little intel for those with J1772 style plugs. I think I have found some portable EVSE chargers that come with an adapter for an RV hookup style plug (NEMA 14-50?) but would love to know what others have bought for this purpose. Also, would love to know if you are parked at a 30 Amp RV hook up if you found you could get a full charge overnight?
 

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Yes, I believe most RV parks will have a NEMA 14-50 outlet, and there are many portable Level 2 EVSEs available from places like Amazon. The main issue might be current. I believe a 30 amp circuit is too small for charging at full power. Some EVSEs might have an ability to lower the max charge rate, and perhaps the car itself has a limit that can be set. Since I have a PHEV, I can't check myself. But as long as you aren't overloading the circuit there should be no issue at all doing this.
 

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RV spaces in parks are usually 30 or 50 amp. but remember if you reserve a car camping space, it may only have a 15 amp outlet. You need to make sure you get an RV site to be sure to have the amps. its the same as the 30 or 50 amp outlet in your home for a charger. The car chargers that plug in are usually not designed to be outdoors so be aware of water.
 

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RV spaces in parks are usually 30 or 50 amp. but remember if you reserve a car camping space, it may only have a 15 amp outlet.
I'll second this note, as I've seen both 30 and 50 amp in RV spots. I've camped overnight in my 2019 Niro EV in that same scenario, and I was grateful to have purchased the Max Green Outdoor charger, available here at Amazon. It has five different adapters, of which I've used three in three months, and the cord is 25 feet long. I used the 50 amp plug at an RV space overnight while also using Utility Mode to cool the car down. I've used the 240V dryer plug (sorry, don't have the NEMA reference at hand) at home just to verify it works. I'm now plugged in at a hotel to a 110 outlet in their parking deck. Slow and steady sometimes fits the bill.

Enjoy that car!
 

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US dryer outlets are NEMA 14-50R. :D
 

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RV spaces in parks are usually 30 or 50 amp. but remember if you reserve a car camping space, it may only have a 15 amp outlet. You need to make sure you get an RV site to be sure to have the amps. its the same as the 30 or 50 amp outlet in your home for a charger. The car chargers that plug in are usually not designed to be outdoors so be aware of water.
Depends, some of the outlets are 110V and some are 220V. And of course will have their unique plug.
 

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Yeah, you are correct, Campsites has 110V, 30A and 50A not 240V. Its not unique, they are standard for that but a 30amp RV plug does NOT look like the 30amp plug for a dryer or oven (220V). I dont have an L2 charger so I can only speak to campsites not what chargers have.
 

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I completely forgot that campsites are all 110v. Don't know what I was thinking. Since the on-board charger (EV) only supports about 24 amps, that's not going to add much range very fast. Maybe 6 miles of range per hour?
 

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But I'm sure they wanted to spend the next night at the campsite anyway. Right?
 

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Any site sold as an "RV" site with electric hookup will have either "30 amp" or "50 amp" service.

However: 30 amp and 50 amp service are not the same voltage. 30 amp service is delivered via a NEMA TT-30 outlet (Sometimes confused with a NEMA 10-30 with dangerous consequences since it's not exactly difficult to force a 120v T-30 male plug into a 10-30 female socket.)
Someone earlier in the thread stated:
its the same as the 30 or 50 amp outlet in your home for a charger.
Nope nope nope. No-one would ever install a NEMA TT-30 in a garage for an EV charger because it's only 120v. You're likely confusing it with the NEMA 10-30 which looks very similar but is a 240v plug rather than 120v. The NEMA 10-30 used to be commonly found for dryer outlets so you do see a lot of EVSE's using this outlet in older homes.

50 amp service is delivered is delivered via a NEMA 14-50 which is the standard plug typically used by EVSEs. So if you have a standard EVSE with the typical 14-50 plug on it, it will charge just fine at any RV park with 50 amp service. The e-Niro only draws about 30-31 amps at 240v, so it's well within the limits of what that 50 amp outlet can provide continuous.

RV sites with "30 amp service" are not ideal for charging EVs specifically because they operate at 120v. TT-30 outlets can provide 24 amps at 120v continuous (2.88 kW) of charging power. 14-50 outlets can provide 40 amps at 240v continuous (9.6kW of charging power) so while "50 amp" doesn't sound that much faster than "30 amp", it's a huge difference due to the voltage.

The other issue with the TT-30 is that adapters for it are not easy to come by because it's not commonly used by EVSEs. And then on top of everything else some EVs (Looking at you GM: Chevy Bolt) and some EVSE cables will self regulate to 12 amps when they see they are connected to a 120v outlet because they assume you're plugged into a standard 15 amp outlet rather than the higher power 30 amp TT-30.

I use a Jesla EVSE which is able to charge at the full 24 amps from a TT-30 and I have successfully charged on TT-30's before. Just don't expect it to charge particularly fast. if you use a cheaper EVSE that self regulated to 12 amps when connected to 120v, expect to be there an especially long time (Multiple days if charging from near 0%)

Source: I've been RVing (And working on RVs) all my life, and have been charging EVs at campsites for 6+ years.
 

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Yep, if we're talking about North America, you have to remember that while the RV park has 30 and 50 amp circuits, they are only 120v. A level 2 EVSE requires 240v to charge anywhere near the speed you expect. I'm not even certain a 32 amp EVSE would pass that much at 120v. It's possible it wouldn't pass any more than 16 amps. Not a big deal for a PHEV, but for an EV with a low battery, you'll only be getting about 12-15 miles added per hour of charging.
 

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if we're talking about North America, you have to remember that while the RV park has 30 and 59 amp circuits, they are only 120v.
Not quite: "30 amp" RV sites are 120v. "50 amp" RV sites are 240v.

As long as you get a 50 amp site you'll charge just fine.
 

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Yeah, 59 was a typo. :oops: As to them being 240v, that surprises me, as I thought all North American RVs only had 120v wiring. But I haven't paid much attention to RVs for the last 30 years.
 

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I thought all North American RVs only had 120v wiring
This is sorta / mostly true. You have to remember that in North America we operate on a "split phase" system. What comes off a transformer is 240v: But it's split into two "legs" of 120v each. Each leg is 180 degrees out of phase with the other so if you combine the legs you get 240v, or if you just use one leg and a neutral you only get 120v. So the "wiring" is all technically 120v because no single wire carries 240v.

In most RVs there are simply no appliances / circuit breakers that combine two legs to make 240v. However it's not impossible. In my motorhome I was actually able to install a 240v breaker in my breaker box to wire up 240v appliances. I even have a NEMA 14-50 on the outside of my motorhome for charging my EV. The reason why RVs never combine two legs to make 240v is because RVs need to remain backward compatible with those "30 amp" outlets which only offer 120v (No 2nd leg to make 240v with.) So if you install a breaker in your RV that combines two legs to make 240v, and you plug into a 30 amp outlet which only offers 120v, your 240v appliance isn't going to get any power (Unless you add a transformer or something, see below). Thus RV manufacturers just stick with using only 120v appliances to avoid this issue with 30 amp TT-30 outlets.

This reminds me of an additional problem with charging an EV on those 30 amp TT-30 outlets: I mentioned earlier that adapters are hard to come by: Someone is probably thinking: "30 amp to 50 amp RV adapters everywhere"... Yeah... and they won't work to charge your EV. The North American split-phase system makes the situation tricky: If you have a 50 amp RV half of your appliances use the first 120v leg. The other half of your appliances use the second 120v leg. There are typically no appliances that combine both L1 and L2 to make 240v but you still need 120v power on both legs for all appliances in your RV to have power. The TT-30 only offers a single leg of 120v and the 14-50 needs two legs... So when they make TT-30 to 14-50 adapters for RVs they splice that single leg from the TT-30 to both the L1 and L2 pins of the 14-50. This gives you 120v on both legs of the 14-50 so that all of your appliances in your RV will work... but it's perfectly "in phase" rather than being 180 degrees out of phase. Since it's exactly in the same phase if you combine L1 and L2 instead of it doubling to 240v, it actually gives you 0v because the voltage "difference" is obviously 0 since it comes from the same wire.

That means if you take a standard RV "30 amp to 50 amp" adapter and plug your EVSE into it: Since the EVSE combines power from L1 and L2 it will see 0v and not come on at all. For EV charging you need a specially wired TT-30 to 14-50 adapter where L1 of the 14-50 goes to the 120v pin of the TT-30 and L2 is connected to neutral. This gives your EVSE 120v rather than 0v.

I mentioned earlier that I actually do have 240v appliances on my motorhome: I have a 10 kWh LiFePO4 battery that I built, 3200 watts of solar and two Victron 5kW inverter/chargers that are wired in "series" to provide split phase 240v. If I plug into a "30 amp" TT-30 which only provides 120v that feeds one of the inverter/chargers which puts it into "charge" mode where it passes through power from that leg to the L1 line of my RVs breaker box and also pulls power from that leg to charge the battery which powers the 2nd inverter. The other inverter continues to operate in "inverter" mode (Pulling power from the battery being charged by inverter #1) so I continue to be able to operate 240v appliances in my RV even when connected to 120v shore power because I have an inverter that provides the 2nd 120v leg (The inverter is smart enough to maintain 180 degrees out of phase with the other leg, which is really cool.)
 

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I knew a lot of that, but you still added plenty I didn't know. Thanks for the write-up!
 
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