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Discussion Starter #1
Some L1 chargers reportedly can be converted to L2 simply by connecting the L1 neutral wire to the other hot2 wire of a 240V circuit.

L1 120. neutral, hot1, ground

L2 240, hot2, hot1, ground

Note: the Niro stock evse specifically warns against this.


Some evse circuit diagrams show the neutral wire connected to the output relay only, not connected to any circuitry inside the evse. The evse is powered by the hot1 and ground wires. If done this way, it is possible to see how simply connecting hot2 to the normally neutral wire would work.

However, the niro stock evse does in fact use the neutral wire to power the evse electronics. It is not a simple passthrough. I determined this by disconnected the neutral wire and seeing that the evse did not function.

FWIW
 

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For at least the US version, it is specifically labeled 120v only. Yeah, I wouldn't try it. 16 amp L2 chargers just aren't that expensive. I think mine was under $200.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Some L1 chargers reportedly can be converted to L2 simply by connecting the L1 neutral wire to the other hot2 wire of a 240V circuit.

L1 120. neutral, hot1, ground

L2 240, hot2, hot1, ground

Note: the Niro stock evse specifically warns against this.


Some evse circuit diagrams show the neutral wire connected to the output relay only, not connected to any circuitry inside the evse. The evse is powered by the hot1 and ground wires. If done this way, it is possible to see how simply connecting hot2 to the normally neutral wire would work.

However, the niro stock evse does in fact use the neutral wire to power the evse electronics. It is not a simple passthrough. I determined this by disconnected the neutral wire and seeing that the evse did not function.

FWIW
On the other hand, I just saw an ad for a Hyundai L1 evse (part number 91887-G7520) L1 to L2 converter. The Hyundai evse looks just like the Kia but for the name Hyundai vs Kia.

part number

Hyundai 91887-G7520
Kia 91887 -G5520

I think I'm going to try it. Worse case if I smoke the L1 I have an excuse to buy a 16a L2 for $150. We are now driving 30 to 50 miles per day and there are times when the L2 faster charge rate would be very useful.

I'll let you know.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
On the other hand, I just saw an ad for a Hyundai L1 evse (part number 91887-G7520) L1 to L2 converter. The Hyundai evse looks just like the Kia but for the name Hyundai vs Kia.

part number

Hyundai 91887-G7520
Kia 91887 -G5520

I think I'm going to try it. Worse case if I smoke the L1 I have an excuse to buy a 16a L2 for $150. We are now driving 30 to 50 miles per day and there are times when the L2 faster charge rate would be very useful.

I'll let you know.
Success!

First I wired a light bulb in series to limit the current should there be a problem in the evse box. There was no problem. I then removed the light bulb and plugged into the car. Indicated charge times are cut in half as expected.

I'm charging at ~2.9kw according to my whole house monitoring system.

I will now build a short conversion cord.
 

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CharlesH some people on the Prius form did exactly what you did with success to charge a Prius Prime, adapting the L1 cord to act as a 240v L2 cord.

As a curiosity I would be interested if your charging time drops down to 2.5 hours from fully discharged to fully charged. I researched doing this before ultimately buying my L2 charging station but in the end chickened out and did not try it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
CharlesH some people on the Prius form did exactly what you did with success to charge a Prius Prime, adapting the L1 cord to act as a 240v L2 cord.

As a curiosity I would be interested if your charging time drops down to 2.5 hours from fully discharged to fully charged. I researched doing this before ultimately buying my L2 charging station but in the end chickened out and did not try it.
I'm only using 12a (stock L1 evse max) so charge time will not be as short as an L2 cord using 16a. I expect just over 3hrs.
 

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I'm only using 12a (stock L1 evse max) so charge time will not be as short as an L2 cord using 16a. I expect just over 3hrs.
Since it's only running at 12 amps, maybe it will be OK, but be sure to monitor how warm the cable gets. Since it's designed for 110/12, 220/12 might get too warm. I acknowledge that 12 amps is 12 amps, regardless of voltage. But you never know... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm only using 12a (stock L1 evse max) so charge time will not be as short as an L2 cord using 16a. I expect just over 3hrs.
Since it's only running at 12 amps, maybe it will be OK, but be sure to monitor how warm the cable gets. Since it's designed for 110/12, 220/12 might get too warm. I acknowledge that 12 amps is 12 amps, regardless of voltage. But you never know... /forum/images/KiaNiroForum/smilies/tango_face_smile.png
Good point. I believe that doubling the voltage will double the power dissipated in the cable.
 

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Success!

First I wired a light bulb in series to limit the current should there be a problem in the evse box. There was no problem. I then removed the light bulb and plugged into the car. Indicated charge times are cut in half as expected.

I'm charging at ~2.9kw according to my whole house monitoring system.

I will now build a short conversion cord.
This sounds great and I would be interested in doing the same. But being somewhat dimwitted and thus chickenhearted about electrical stuff I'd need a blow by blow description with pictures to attempt to do it myself. It would be great is you would do that for we Niro pHEV owners (as long as your house is still standing a month later). :D
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Good point. I believe that doubling the voltage will double the power dissipated in the cable.
I can't feel any warming in the cable after an hour of charging. The cable is AWG 12 which if overkill for 12 amps so I'm not surprised there is no noticeable warming.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This sounds great and I would be interested in doing the same. But being somewhat dimwitted and thus chickenhearted about electrical stuff I'd need a blow by blow description with pictures to attempt to do it myself. It would be great is you would do that for we Niro pHEV owners (as long as your house is still standing a month later). :D
I'll document building the conversion cord. I'm going from a 6-20R 240V wall socket to a 5-15R 120v socket compatible with the Niro evse. What kind of socket is you 240V source?


DISCLAIMER. Do this at your own risk. The Niro evse specifically says not to do it.
 

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I'll document building the conversion cord. I'm going from a 6-20R 240V wall socket to a 5-15R 120v socket compatible with the Niro evse. What kind of socket is you 240V source?


DISCLAIMER. Do this at your own risk. The Niro evse specifically says not to do it.

Is this conversion simply a matter of rearranging the wiring the L1 charger?

Forgive my ignorance but I'm admittedly low on the electrical IQ scale! I am currently using the L1 cord that came with the Niro, plugged into a standard 120v outlet. However, my home has a NEMA 6-50 charging socket that was here when purchased but I do not have a charging cord with a matching male component. I assume that is an L2 level.

I don't feel the need for charging speed so much that I would consider spending $250 on another charging cord such as this. But if it is a simple, inexpensive matter to convert the OEM cord to obtain faster charging from a 120V outlet, I would consider doing that.
 

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A NEMA 6-50R outlet (the R stands for receptacle) is typically connected to a 220/50a circuit, although usually at that high of amperage they use a NEMA 14-50R outlet with 4 wires. That's what I wired for my daughter's Pacifica. Even though her car tops out at 32 amps, they bought a 40 amp EVSE (JuiceBox) for a possible future EV. With a 14-50R outlet, you would have three AWG 8 wires (hot1, hot2 and common) and an AWG 10 ground. With the NEMA 6-50R, you would not have the common wire. Do you need it? Only if the device you are connecting is wired for a NEMA 14-50R outlet. If you look at the higher powered EVSEs, most of them offer a cord with either plug, so the equipment itself must not care.
 

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I don't feel the need for charging speed so much that I would consider spending $250 on another charging cord such as this. But if it is a simple, inexpensive matter to convert the OEM cord to obtain faster charging from a 120V outlet, I would consider doing that.
You might be surprised how helpful it is to have an L2 EVSE available. Other than my commute, which is slightly more than my car's range, most of my driving is trips of 10-20 miles, usually 2-3 times a day. With L2, I almost always have a full battery every time I leave the house, so seldom use the ICE. I had one tank of gas that registered 345 MPG, so every little bit in EV mode helps. And you don't need to spend anywhere near $250. I'm not certain if this is the exact one I bought, but mine looks identical and there's a number that look like it, and it's $165. Note that it doesn't have a NEMA 6-50P, it uses a NEMA 6-20P. Since you only need a 16 amp EVSE, it doesn't tax the circuit enough to need a heaver connection.

https://smile.amazon.com/DUOSIDA-Level-Electric-Vehicle-Charger/dp/B018A6QK7C/ref=sr_1_6?keywords=16+amp+evse&qid=1569628552&s=gateway&sr=8-6
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Is this conversion simply a matter of rearranging the wiring the L1 charger?

Forgive my ignorance but I'm admittedly low on the electrical IQ scale! I am currently using the L1 cord that came with the Niro, plugged into a standard 120v outlet. However, my home has a NEMA 6-50 charging socket that was here when purchased but I do not have a charging cord with a matching male component. I assume that is an L2 level.

I don't feel the need for charging speed so much that I would consider spending $250 on another charging cord such as this. But if it is a simple, inexpensive matter to convert the OEM cord to obtain faster charging from a 120V outlet, I would consider doing that.
Make one of these for $20



https://www.ebay.com/i/264347021532?chn=ps&var=563947237746&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-117182-37290-0&mkcid=2&itemid=563947237746_264347021532&targetid=541453963372&device=c&mktype=pla&googleloc=9029718&campaignid=6470552628&mkgroupid=81274342767&rlsatarget=aud-496202329659:pla-541453963372&abcId=1139336&merchantid=6296724&gclid=Cj0KCQjw5rbsBRCFARIsAGEYRwdXBTwfkZWjScQl305kHxEGm3_OwmKMbwF309k3e7d8L04eCYzsOeQaApQwEALw_wcB
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
This sounds great and I would be interested in doing the same. But being somewhat dimwitted and thus chickenhearted about electrical stuff I'd need a blow by blow description with pictures to attempt to do it myself. It would be great is you would do that for we Niro pHEV owners (as long as your house is still standing a month later). /forum/images/KiaNiroForum/smilies/tango_face_grin.png
I'll document building the conversion cord. I'm going from a 6-20R 240V wall socket to a 5-15R 120v socket compatible with the Niro evse. What kind of socket is you 240V source?


DISCLAIMER. Do this at your own risk. The Niro evse specifically says not to do it.
Attached are photos of my conversion cord. $12. Niro stock evse connects to one end, 6-20R wall plug on the other end.
 

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There is often a difference in the voltage transient protection components between 120VAC and 240VAC devices and that is one reason why there can be a warning not to operate something rated at 120VAC on a higher voltage. That may not be the case for the Kia L1 EVSE but I haven't seen an evaluation of the circuits to know for sure. If the higher voltage causes the transient protection devices to fail, the input fuse to the EVSE may blow or it may just loose the voltage transient protection without any indication of a problem. Without some engineering evaluation of the L1 EVSE, it's not a good idea to be using it on a higher voltage even if it appears to be working OK. If an L2 EVSE is available for less than $200, spend the money and don't take a chance of damaging the battery charger in the car.
 

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Attached are photos of my conversion cord. $12. Niro stock evse connects to one end, 6-20R wall plug on the other end.
Thanks. We all would love to hear back from you in a month, including your charging time.
 
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