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2019 White PHEV EX Prem, Mich Premier AS tires, LED BU lights, window visors 2022 Subaru OB Touring
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm curious about the cold weather option with the PCT heater. Those of you who have this option:
1. Where do you live?
2. How fast does it warm up the air and how much does it impact your EV range?
 

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2022 Bolt EUV Premier
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It's likely very similar to my Bolt. The heater will draw around 7kW at max power, but the cabin warms rather quickly so the power draw drops down to maybe 2-3kW. It's an efficient heater, although a heat pump would be more efficient. As to range, I see 30-35% loss of range driving here in the Seattle area, with the higher amount of loss when I travel at freeway speeds. The cold is certainly the major factor on that loss, but the wet roads can be a noticeable issue with range as well.
 
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2023 Niro PHEV SX Touring + cold weather package
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Since we've only had our PHEV for a week and this is our first hybrid/plug-in car, we’re still learning its nuances,
1. Just outside Philly. So while still chilly, we've had no snow yet and mild temps.
2. The car warms up much faster than other cars we've owned with similar features (cabin, heated seats, heated steering wheel). I actually find the steering wheel gets too hot, which is kind of a bummer. It certainly feels odd that after dropping the kids off at school the engine temp is still cold - because of running solely off battery.

I’ve been using the Access app a bunch, though it was down all day yesterday. From there I can program the car to warm up at a certain time, weekdays only, and which accessories (cabin, steering, driver seat, and passenger rear seat). Pretty slick, but not sure if I’ll continue paying for that after my 1-year trial expires.

While I don’t have nearly enough time with the car to give detailed impact numbers, the previous comment feels accurate. We’ve been experimenting with drive modes and have charged a few times mid day, but I think I’ve been getting 20 miles+-, on EV+, while staying nice and toasty. The scheduled morning warm up happens while the car is still plugged in, so I’m not sure if that pulls on the battery or the charger.
 

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2023 Kia Niro PHEV EX
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I have a 2023 Niro PHEV with the Cold Weather Package, purchased in late December 2022.
1. Chicago metro area. In my first month of ownership, daily temperatures have been in the 20s and 30s F, so I have been using the heater regularly.
2. I second adhack's description above. The car heats up much faster than any previous vehicles, including a 2017 Prius Prime and a 2010 Prius. Both the cabin and heated seats warm up much more quickly. This is the first time I've had a heated steering wheel, and I turn the wheel is sufficiently warm for me to turn off the heater within only 60-90 seconds. Likewise, I start my seat heater at Level 3 (maximum) and am able to turn it off within about 3 minutes.

I don't yet have a sense of how much impact the heater has on EV range, but I know I have driven about 25-30 miles in full EV with the heater on. When spring comes, I'll be able to make a comparison.
 

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2023 Niro EV Wave
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All PHEV's have some sort of resistive heat. It's the biggest draw on your traction battery and your range.

You want to hypermile your PHEV, drive without heat. If you have a short trip in the winter, pre-heat on the charger and drive without heat. It's cheaper in the long run, it'll increase your range, and raise your overall MPG.
 

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2022 Bolt EUV Premier
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All PHEV's have some sort of resistive heat.
No, they don't. My '19 Niro PHEV did not have such any heater. The 2023 Niro is the first year that offers a PTC heater, and it's only an option on the Touring trim levels. But they are becoming more and more prevalent with each model refresh. Toyota puts heat pumps in all their Prime vehicles, and the Outlander switched from a PTC heater to a heat pump for 2023. Since you can't get a Hyundai PHEV in my state, I haven't looked closely at their models. Kia also has a couple of other PHEVs, but unless they too just got the option this year they don't have one.

BTW, I'm only referring to the heaters that actually put out enough heat to warm the cabin. Some earlier PHEVs had a very small heater that was only good for defogging the windshield.

You want to hypermile your PHEV, drive without heat.
Some of us have medical conditions that make no heat impossible. I agree that heating the cabin uses a lot of power. But for some, it's necessary.
 
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2022 Ioniq 5 SE AWD, 2005 Subaru Baja Turbo.
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On a Facebook group someone said they just got a new 2023 Sportage phev but were never told it had no heater, so it's running the gas motor all the time when they first start driving it. I think they kind of felt cheated since it said the EV range would be enough to get them to work and back with no gas, but it still needs the gas motor when its cold.

Our 2022 Niro phev was the same way, you couldn't actually drive it as an EV 8 months out of the year since running the gas motor was the only source of heat. Good to see at least a PTC heater is now an option even if it hurts battery range it may work on short trips.
 

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No, they don't. My '19 Niro PHEV did not have such any heater. The 2023 Niro is the first year that offers a PTC heater, and it's only an option on the Touring trim levels. But they are becoming more and more prevalent with each model refresh. Toyota puts heat pumps in all their Prime vehicles, and the Outlander switched from a PTC heater to a heat pump for 2023. Since you can't get a Hyundai PHEV in my state, I haven't looked closely at their models. Kia also has a couple of other PHEVs, but unless they too just got the option this year they don't have one.

BTW, I'm only referring to the heaters that actually put out enough heat to warm the cabin. Some earlier PHEVs had a very small heater that was only good for defogging the windshield.


Some of us have medical conditions that make no heat impossible. I agree that heating the cabin uses a lot of power. But for some, it's necessary.
I stand corrected. And I agree with your statements. I forgot to take into account that the lower trim levels of certain brands didn't add the resistive heat as a standard equipment.

The HEV's and PHEV's I've owned in the past have all been upper trim levels and had some way to pre-heat the interior without running the ICE. Either through an app, or physically setting up the system in the car.

And agreed, they were small, but they did heat the interior enough to "tough it out" and use the seat heater and steering heat until you got to your destination without running the ICE. Not all cars are created equal, I guess.....

As for needing heat for a human condition, I understand and I'm not disparaging anybody. Ever since the first hybrids came ashore, heat, air and battery have been huge discussions. But as an old hypermiler like myself, (pulse/glide, barefoot big toe driving, no heat in the cold) and you want to "beat the next guy" on your range, drive around with no heat.

The Kia/Hyundai heat pump system in the EV for '23 is so innovative. And it's basically one of the sole reasons I bought it. Now I can hypermile it, run around with no resistive heat, but I still have some sort of heat, however small it is. With the heat pump, the air coming from the vents inside, is above the outside air temperature.

This is just the beginning. In the years to come, the winner of the "electric car" race will be that manufacturer that can design a car with maximum range...........with heat.
 

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2022 Bolt EUV Premier
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It is a shame they don't use heat pumps in all PHEVs, but I suspect it's all based on cost. I know in my Bolt the resistive heater is a massive range drain, and I have no doubt my particular area (the greater Seattle area) would see great benefits with a HP instead of the resistive heat.
 
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