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As I sit here fast charging on a long road trip, I thought I would put an abbreviated summary for any new folks to this forum.

I highly recommend the PlugShare app which shows all brands for whatever map area you are looking. I have used both Electrify America and EVgo for fast charging along the Interstate highways. Unfortunately EVgo only goes up to 50 kW and the normal charge I will get is only about 42 kW rate. The Electrify America pumps range up to 350 kW rating and so they will provide the maximum your Kia Niro will accept. With their new program for pass plus members of four dollars per month, you get a really good rate of only $.31 per kilowatt (that rate I’ve seen in WA and OR), after they recently changed away from billing by the minute. My experience after several long day road trips is that at around 20% you’ll get in the low 70s of kilowatt rate of charge (and I’ve seen up to 76kw) and once you hit 50% it drops a bit to the 50s- 60s kw rate of charge. Further incremental drops I’ve noticed are down to 58 kW rate of charge when my state of charge is in the 60s. And then in the mid to high 70s of state of charge it drops into the 30s kw rate of charge. Due to a very long road trip day when I would not have any more fast chargers available where I was going, I stayed on the fast charger one time up until about 93%. At that point it was only giving me 11 kW rate of charge.
so this is just to say that if you are going to be doing the fast charging along the way, it’s better to use down your charge to around 20% rather than using the fast charger starting at 50%. You will get a faster charge.
 

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To add to this: I just got back from a long road trip in my Niro EV, and I found that I couldn't charge faster than around 33 kW at an Electrify America station (On a charger supposedly capable of 150 kW). I was really worried that something was wrong with the car. But I think it was just that charging station. I drove to another EA station and the car immediately jumped to 68 kW of charging power (At around 10% state of charge). I did the math and realized the 33 kW I was getting was exactly 100 amps at the battery voltage which was probably limited by a problem with the station rather than the car itself.

So if you have a slow charging experience at EA, try moving to another charging stand/cabinet. It could just be a bad charger. And remember to report on PlugShare so other drivers know to avoid that particular charging cabinet. (Usually numbered at EA stations as #1, #2, #3, etc)

One thing to keep in mind: The car reports kW, and the station reports kW, but the actual charge limits are really in amps not kW. The 150 kW charging stations can deliver up to 300 amps. The Niro EV can accept up to 200 amps. The kW power you get at 200 amps varies based on the battery voltage. When the battery is fully depleted the voltage is around 300 volts. When it's fully charged it's around 400 volts. The nominal voltage is roughly 360v.

So if you're at like 2% charge and you plug in and pull the full 200 amps from the charging station, the kW reported will only be around 60kW. As the voltage increases it eventually gets to around 385 volts where it's starting to get closer to 60% SoC... then the kW reported will have increased to 77kW. From 60 kW to 77 kW you are still pulling the same 200 amps. But it's around the 385 voltage that the amperage starts to taper off which is why the max kW of 77-78 kW always occurs between 50-60% state of charge.
 

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Yeah, EA still has some work to do with their charger reliability. And the initial power draw is highly dependent on conditions: battery temp, SoC, outdoor temp, and very possibly if it's a Thursday. OK, maybe not the last one. :D
 
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