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Hello all, I am nw here and I will add, I am a woman who does not understand cars well :) So please be kind to me :) So I have a question. Here in Europe (Belgium) niro plug in is arriving only in 6 month (if ordered now), so I could not get much reviews. I have a specific question, maybe you, who are driving your niro plug ins can tell me - I have heard both from prius plug in and mitsubishi outlander plug in owners that if one drives back and forth to work, a short trip, charges the electric battery at work, so it's almost always full, it kind of makes the hybrid battery idle. I understand, that in order to start the car, it uses the hybrid battery, right? The problem in both prius and outlander was that after a while driving only in electric mode, the car does not start because the hybrid batery is flat... Has ir happened to you?
 

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There is only one big battery in the car for both hybrid use and "plug in" power use, plus a small 12 V battery. The main battery can never go flat in a PHEV as the engine will recharge it when it falls below a specified amount. Generally, the computers will keep the battery charge between 30 and 70 percent to increase battery life. Charging to "100%" by plug in power, really only charges to 70 to 80%. But you will still have the full promised range.
 

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There is only one big battery in the car for both hybrid use and "plug in" power use, plus a small 12 V battery. The main battery can never go flat in a PHEV as the engine will recharge it when it falls below a specified amount. Generally, the computers will keep the battery charge between 30 and 70 percent to increase battery life. Charging to "100%" by plug in power, really only charges to 70 to 80%. But you will still have the full promised range.
I really hope this is correct. It really simplifies things. I just would like to see Kia engineering saying it. If you ever run across a Kia source please post it.
 

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No source needed. All plug ins work this way - they are just a hybrid with a larger battery and ability to plug in to charge. Think about it! It is simple. But there are diagrams out there of the architecture.

Yes, most of the added battery cells in the PHEV are in two locations, but they are treated as one large battery (just as the many cells that make up the hybrid battery are treated as one battery). It would be highly inefficient to have one battery for the hybrid mode and one for plug in EV miles.

In the North American Niros, there is a 12 V lithium battery attached to the 360 V traction battery under the rear seat, but obviously electrically separated. In 2017 Ioniq/Niro models other than North America came with a 12 V lead acid battery in the right rear of the cargo hold. All the PHEV's come with the same 12 V lead acid battery in the same location. I don't know why actually. The reason given for the 12 V lithium battery was to save 40 pounds of weight. The PHEV traction battery is 480 volts I believe as an aside.
 
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