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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I live in the Midwest but have been super excited to try to get a Kia e-Niro. I've talked to a few Kia service places here and they (unsurprisingly) have said that they aren't qualified to work on the e-Niro. Does anyone know the best way to get service if they live >500 mi from the nearest e-Niro dealer?

Thanks!!
 

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I'm not certain I'd be willing to buy a vehicle that can't be serviced within my local area. It would be different if you lived near the state border and the next state over offered service. As much as I agree with your enthusiasm, I can't say I'd recommend buying out of state if it's that far to the nearest service location. Think of what it would cost to have it towed to a servicing dealership. Something that Kia Roadside Assistance probably won't cover the entire amount.
 

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Thanks for the quick reply. I agree with you, it's the main reason I'm considering a Tesla instead of a Niro. There are some service shops in the area that specialize in electric/hybrid vehicles, I was hoping that Kia may let me bring it to them for warranty repair if there isn't a Kia service area nearby.

Here's to hoping they expand production out here soon!
 

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I doubt Kia would approve any warranty work outside a Kia dealership. It is tough looking for an EV when you don't live in a ZEV CARB state. My state follows the CA emissions rules, but we aren't a ZEV state. I'm amazed they brought the Niro EV here, when Hyundai won't bring the Kona EV to WA or OR, and OR is a ZEV state.
 

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Thanks for the help. I'll probably check out a Model 3 or a used Model S. If all else fails, hopefully some patience will see more EVs make it out here.
 

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Doesn't a Kia dealer HAVE to provide warranty for all Kia models?
Yes, but they can require you to use an authorized Kia facility. If the local ones aren't authorized for EV then you'd probably be responsible to get it to one that is.
 

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Yes, but they can require you to use an authorized Kia facility. If the local ones aren't authorized for EV then you'd probably be responsible to get it to one that is.
I spoke with a service person a Kia and they said that most likely if I brought in the car for service on the battery or electric powertrain, they'd ship it to the nearest authorized service center. On the plus side, the person I spoke with believed they'd pay the shipping. On the other hand, I'd probably be losing my car for almost a week just due to shipping time.
 

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I guess the other thing I just thought of is that my situation can't be that unique. Anyone on a road trip outside the ZEV states (even if they live in one) can get stuck with issues that put them hundreds of miles from the qualified service folks. Kia has to have a plan in place for that.
 

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I guess the other thing I just thought of is that my situation can't be that unique. Anyone on a road trip outside the ZEV states (even if they live in one) can get stuck with issues that put them hundreds of miles from the qualified service folks. Kia has to have a plan in place for that.

That's why I would be very surprised that any Kia dealer can't/wouldn't service any of the Kia models. I wonder if one of the people that work for a Kia dealer that hang around here could weigh in on this.
 

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In shopping for my Niro EV, I spoke with my local dealer here in Virginia before buying the car in Maryland. He said that Kia had designated this area as a "green area", and therefore required that their techs be trained to service EVs. So, for the (hopefully rare) times that I need service, the dealer should be able to help me.
 

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Servicing an EV requires hundreds of thousands of dollars in tool, training and parts. This is why some dealers don’t sell the EV model. Dealers in TX are a good example. The payback just isn’t there.
Second, Kia offered to buy back an acquaintance’s car when he moved from CA to FL.
For the person considering a Tesla, be very careful. Definitely DO NOT buy a used S. Non-warranty costs are astronomical and can take weeks to get a simple part. Also, paint/clear coat quality is terrible.
You may be better off waiting a year or two when there will be a plethora of EV’s on the market.
IMHO, the biggest reason for even considering a Tesla is their Supercharger network. A road trip in any other EV is a trip in frustration. Even with a Tesla, expect to go miles out of your way for a Charger. Suggest you take a look at Better Trip Planner. FWIW, one trip in the Tesla requiring Supercharing, wife said Never Again, not worth the time/inconvenience. And, if you live in a cold or very hot climate, it just gets worse with any EV. Like seeing your range drop by HALF.
Which brings me to the Niro PHEV. For all it’s faults, it makes a lot of sense as it does a credible job as either a city car or a road tripper.
 

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Which brings me to the Niro PHEV. For all it’s faults, it makes a lot of sense as it does a credible job as either a city car or a road tripper.
The precise reason I leased a PHEV instead of buying an EV. Back in the spring I was considering a temporary but long term job move from Seattle to either Fort Worth or DC. Not only did I need the ability to drive the distance in a relatively fast time, but I had to consider charging once I was there. Since it was to be overall a short time frame (2 years max), I was just going to rent an apartment. Every place I considered had nothing available nor nearby for car charging. So, I opted for the PHEV. The Niro is large enough I could have packed what I needed to take with me, and has outstanding freeway range on a tank of gas.

Since the likelihood of such a job move has faded, I'm satisfied with the PHEV for the duration of my lease (another 2 1/2 years). But I won't consider buying it at lease end. This car just makes me want a BEV more strongly than ever. When I return this car in May 2022, there will be at least 6 potential EVs on the market that would satisfy my range needs, as well as my desire for bells and whistles. The Niro EV by that time might have higher range, maybe a heads up display, or something else that I can't think of but can't live without. :D But the VW ID.4 will also be here by then, and from details available so far will be a strong consideration. And who knows what else will be here by then?
 

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I live in a state that doesn't sell the e-niro but they still have one authorized dealership in the state (might have been in region) that is certified to handle the e-Niro. That location is 78 miles from me and the closest place to currently buy an e-Niro is 753 miles away. Since Colorado has a $5,000 refundable credit for Plug in Hybrids and electric cars, we do have a lot of people driving various EVs and Hybrids so we could be unusual in having one certified.

I can say however that my local dealership says that Kia dealerships often specialize in a specific car to repair and only that dealership is authorized in a region to do certain work on that vehicle. If I have problems again with intermittent failure to fully charge they want me to take it to the e-Niro dealership since they would know more about charging problems. I suggest asking your local dealership where the closest e-Niro certified repair shop is. On the positive side, the e-Niro certified dealership said that they would most likely give me a rental car if I did bring my car in since we are a one car family and I wouldn't have anyway to get back home.

My local dealership may have fixed the problem in looking for the problem since I haven't had a problem since and that was 2 months ago. I had 3 times it start charging only to stop sometime during the charge over a two week period. The first of those turned out to be the public charger's fault (business admitted it been doing that to all cars for several weeks by the time I had used it and they finally took the charger off line with Charge Point, but never put an out of order sign on it). The second time was at home and so I know for sure that it was a true charge failure. The third time was at a gerry rigged charger where the changing hose was threaded under a loading dock door and they might just have turned the power off. I'm also wondering if maybe that 1st charger that was causing problems for everyone may have started all the problems.
 
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