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2. is correct. It has been a while since I've read the warning and yes, it does sound like the DCT. I just assumed it would be the engine clutch as I thought hydraulic control would be easier to engineer than what I had thought were simple solenoid control of the DCT. Apparently the electrically activated DCT has enough control to maintain a constant slip.
 

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Does any other hybrid drivetrain exist that utilizes a dct? Besides the Ioniq. Also very much like the dialogue in regards to how this drivetrain truely functions. Sure would be nice if Kia/Hyundai would clearly define in a video. Or get feedback from their engineering department.
 

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Does any other hybrid drivetrain exist that utilizes a dct? Besides the Ioniq. Also very much like the dialogue in regards to how this drivetrain truely functions. Sure would be nice if Kia/Hyundai would clearly define in a video. Or get feedback from their engineering department.
Honda has a seven speed Fit hybrid that was mostly released to left hand drive Asian markets. Very cool car, at the time of release would have been the best EPA mpg of any vehicle in the US. I actually wrote them at the time, 2015?, got a call from PR and that was the end of it. I thought it was pretty foolish not to make for the US market for bragging rights, and building off perhaps the best selling small car sold here, the ICE Fit.

What did you want to know about how the car functions? Pretty well described. Engine>engine clutch>motor>DCT>wheels. Simple.
 

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Thanks for info and video referall. Does help. Would be better if one that showed it functioning with the electric motor and engine clutch.
 

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Here is an account of what I am doing as far as the clutch actuator fluid. It is by no means met as a method others should use. This is only an account of what I am doing.

Today I did my first 7,500 maintenance interval. I like to do the work myself so I did all the recommended items for the 7500 maintenance interval.

I also changed my clutch actuator fluid. I sucked out the container located in the engine compartment and filled with new Dot 3 brake fluid. I am going to do this at every 7,500 miles when I do the oil change. I used my vacuum gun to remove the fluid and used a new can of fluid and funnel to replenish the fluid I withdrew. I was able to completely empty the container with the vacuum gun. I did not attempt to empty or withdraw fluid from the hose to the actuator. The cost of the Dot 3 brake fluid was $1.25 Walmart Super Tech brand-same ingredient and specs as the Prestone only $1.00 cheaper.

Here are some pictures of before and after. No problems after doing the job with the vehicle or ride.
 

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JohnXYZ- that's what I'm going to do after I get the first flush/change at the dealer, just so I can find out exactly what they do. I'm guessing maybe they pressure flush it like with brakes. Maybe there's a special tool/cover to fit the clutch actuator reservoir, so that's the extra cost. Or the software check/diagnostic they supposedly do afterward. There has to be some reason they charge ~1.5 hr. or more labor time for the ECA change. A regular pressure brake flush is only ~$100, and that involves bleeding at the four brakes.
After I pay for the first one to pick the mechs brain, I'll change the fluid from reservoir like you. I'm going to get a vacuum pump instead of turkey-basters I've used for years on brake reservoirs- so it's less likely to introduce air into system in case it's more critical.
BTW, the third pic looks like youre a bit above the fill line:)
 

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I am not going to go to the dealer and pay them to do it. Instead I am going to drain the actuator fluid container and refill with new fluid each time i do an oil change . This will be three times (3x7500 miles) before the 22,500 mark. That should more than serves as a complete fluid exchange.

The cost is incidental for me doing this, about $1.25(x3) for the fluid and 15 minutes of my time (x3) vs $150 to $180 for the dealer to do it.

I am doing it at each oil change to make sure I achieve a complete fluid exchange every 22,500 miles.

After reading the service manual I believe the dealer if they did it right would pull a vacuum on the system and remove as much fluid as they could before injecting the new fluid and then bleeding out any air with the diagnostic tools. I think my way is equivalent to theirs at a savings of $150.

This is by no means a method I recommend to anyone else, it was posted as a item of interest if anyone had questions about how others have decided to handle this. If after doing a number of changes I see no difference in fluid color I may adjust my interval. This time I noticed a definite difference in the actuator fluid color as compared to the brake fluid color. The actuator was much darker in color. After the change it is the same color as the brake fluid.

After reading others experiences I question if many of the dealers actually do this service.
 

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Mine still looks clear and I'm almost at 7k miles since the change, at the 22k change it was really dark weird his is dark at 7500 miles though. Maybe the break-in makes it darker.

I ran 2 bottles through mine to get it clear it did cycle and get darker but it eventually got clear with every change. I'll probably just suck it out at every oil change because it only takes like one minute and I don't have to keep up with the last time I did it.But I only change my oil once a year 10k miles.
 

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Mine still looks clear and I'm almost at 7k miles since the change, at the 22k change it was really dark weird his is dark at 7500 miles though. Maybe the break-in makes it darker.

I ran 2 bottles through mine to get it clear it did cycle and get darker but it eventually got clear with every change. I'll probably just suck it out at every oil change because it only takes like one minute and I don't have to keep up with the last time I did it.But I only change my oil once a year 10k miles.
I have changed the clutch actuator fluid at 30000 miles, it is still yellowish and almost clear with fewer drops of oily substance floating on top. Significant improvement compared to fluid removed at 22000 miles.
Please see the attached picture.
 

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Just to add a little insight as to changing fluid in a dual-clutch transmission, I have a 2012 VW GTI with a 6-speed DSG (dual-clutch transmission). It requires changing fluid every 40,000 miles. Dealer cost is around $800 (I paid $575 for 40k service including the DSG fluid change at an independent VW-specializing garage and that was 3 years ago)! The fluid itself is about $125. I'd never skimp on the GTI's maintenance, and I'm too old (and feeble) to do it myself. Now, the GTI was out of warranty when I had it done; the Niro has a 10 year 100k miles powertrain warranty, which certainly includes the transmission. The big question is: If you have a tranny failure, what records of fluid change will be required and at what interval for them to cover the problem?
 

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VW may have a wet clutch. The Niro has a dry clutch (all three of them) and the transmission fluid is only for the gears. I might be mistaken, but I don't think you ever need to change it. If you do, it will be at some extreme interval like 100,000 miles.

The dual clutch is electrically activated. The engine clutch is hydraulically activated and what this thread is about. Its fluid is supposed to be changed every 22,000 miles but at least one person here sold his Niro at 157,000? miles without ever doing it (or the transmission oil for that matter).
 

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The engine clutch is hydraulically activated and what this thread is about.
Sorry, I saw so many posts about the DCT that I thought that was what it was about. My bad. Good to hear that the DCT in the Kia does not require expensive maintenance.
 

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VW may have a wet clutch. The Niro has a dry clutch (all three of them) and the transmission fluid is only for the gears. I might be mistaken, but I don't think you ever need to change it. If you do, it will be at some extreme interval like 100,000 miles.
I think you're right, Kia considers the transmission fluid a "lifetime" fill unless you meet the Severe Usage conditions where they recommend replacement at 75,000 miles. Having said that, I will probably change it out at 100,000 miles or so. VW has (had?) the same policy with their manual transmissions but many people, myself included have found that changing the fluid at around that mark improves shift feel as it gets notchy over time. I would presume that the DCT in the Niro would be similar. Eventually the additives in the oil start to break down and that can reduce the performance of the synchros in particular.
 

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VW may have a wet clutch. The Niro has a dry clutch (all three of them) and the transmission fluid is only for the gears. I might be mistaken, but I don't think you ever need to change it. If you do, it will be at some extreme interval like 100,000 miles.

The dual clutch is electrically activated. The engine clutch is hydraulically activated and what this thread is about. Its fluid is supposed to be changed every 22,000 miles but at least one person here sold his Niro at 157,000? miles without ever doing it (or the transmission oil for that matter).
I hear you talking about me. Lol.
 
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