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I am having second thoughts. I think I am change regardless if it is clean or not. I don’t want anything happening because they might lie and say that I refused. I think I am going to do to research to find a mechanic who specializes in hybrid cars. The problem is that it is hard because most don’t know how to work on hybrid cars.
You might be able to find a mechanic that has the right equipment, or you might find it easier to take it to a different dealer. There's a 2017 manual online that describes the repair procedure here. If you're just changing the fluid, it's not as complicated as what's described in that link, but if you get any air in the line, then there's a procedure half way down the page that talks about using the "KDS" to purge the air and re-train the car. The KDS is a diagnostic tool that costs a little over USD $5,000. Anyone with the right equipment should be able to flush the line without introducing air, but if they make a mistake and they don't have a KDS, then you might wind up needing to visit the dealer after that. And given that several people have had concerns about shifting problems, one can speculate that periodic retraining with a KDS might be an important part of this maintenance procedure.
 

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There is a lot of D.Y.I's out there doing this service themselves. I just had the service done @ the dealership . Cost was 140. Had a good Conversation with the Top Mechanic doing this service. There is more to this service than just replacing the fluid. He printed out the complete service, which I will attach. He stated few niro owners are doing this service and agree'd that by not complying to what is dictated in the service manual. You are risking your warranty protection if problems arise. These dual clutch transmissions are highly technical and repair costs will be also. It's a no brainers decision for me to have this service done. Best of luck to those who chose otherwise.
The Engine Clutch Actuator and it's fluid has nothing to do with the DCT(dual clutch transmission)! They are two totally different things! I keep seeing this error in the threads. I really hope you did not get that info from the Kia mechanic..somehow I think you must've misunderstood the tech, as the paperwork looks like the right procedure.
 

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In this DIY opinion- The Service Technicians pull a vacuum on the system and get as much fluid out as possible then add the fluid. The next procedure would be for exercising the clutch to remove any entrapped air. There is no bleed port or way to physically bleed fluid from the system.

Here is the actual procedure from the manual - if you scroll down to step 2 in the clutch replacement it details what the technician detailed on your bill.

One of the supposed advantages of hydraulic clutches is that they are self adjusting.

One individual on the forum went over 150,000 miles with no fluid change or adjustment-while I am not confident doing that it does point out these clutches work very well with minimal attention
54,000 miles on the 2019 Niro and haven't touched it yet. I'll call you all when I get stranded and need a lift.
 

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I thought I posted Actuator Fluid pictures (pictures of sediment after the FIRST change at 30,362 miles and after the SECOND change at 36,314 miles) but don't see a post with such. I used the suck old fluid out and add new fluid. I use an old Radiator Fluid Tester because I had one on hand. It has a narrow tube so gets down into the reservoir pretty good.
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Nice pictures! Thanks. Seeing that sediment certainly encourages me to do the same.

Are you planning on doing short interval changes going forward? A second 30,000 change would have been extra interesting.
 

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Just to add another data point, I changed the fluid today in my 2019 after 15K miles using one of these syringes.

Old fluid was amber but not very cloudy. I noticed that there was a lot of really fine white sediment in the bottom of the reservoir that didn't come out for the first suck. Adding the fresh stuff stirred it up into a cloudy, milky yellow. I used PEAK. I pulled out the first refill immediately to get all the sediment it stirred up, then refilled a second time so it was clear.

Someone earlier mentioned the same thing happening, but thought it was because of bubbles. I don't think bubbles caused the cloudiness. I tried blowing bubbles into some new fluid, but it doesn't go cloudy.

If there's that much sediment @ 30K, I'm going to make another attempt to get the local dealership to do it. I called to ask about it and they said they'd never done it before, but someone else asked that week too. They said they could quote me for parts but didn't know about labor. I said it was Dot3. They forwarded my call to the parts department...

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Sounds like you should talk to one of the mechanics NOT the service guy that answers the phone.
 

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Just to add another data point, I changed the fluid today in my 2019 after 15K miles using one of these syringes.

Old fluid was amber but not very cloudy. I noticed that there was a lot of really fine white sediment in the bottom of the reservoir that didn't come out for the first suck. Adding the fresh stuff stirred it up into a cloudy, milky yellow. I used PEAK. I pulled out the first refill immediately to get all the sediment it stirred up, then refilled a second time so it was clear.

Someone earlier mentioned the same thing happening, but thought it was because of bubbles. I don't think bubbles caused the cloudiness. I tried blowing bubbles into some new fluid, but it doesn't go cloudy.

If there's that much sediment @ 30K, I'm going to make another attempt to get the local dealership to do it. I called to ask about it and they said they'd never done it before, but someone else asked that week too. They said they could quote me for parts but didn't know about labor. I said it was Dot3. They forwarded my call to the parts department...

View attachment 6798
Y'all do what you want. I put 160k on the first Niro and 119k on this one and never touched that fluid. My motto if it ain't broke, don't fix it. If it is broke, get a new car. Good luck.
 

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There is a lot of D.Y.I's out there doing this service themselves. I just had the service done @ the dealership . Cost was 140. Had a good Conversation with the Top Mechanic doing this service. There is more to this service than just replacing the fluid. He printed out the complete service, which I will attach. He stated few niro owners are doing this service and agree'd that by not complying to what is dictated in the service manual. You are risking your warranty protection if problems arise. These dual clutch transmissions are highly technical and repair costs will be also. It's a no brainers decision for me to have this service done. Best of luck to those who chose otherwise.
The more I read of your posts, the more I'm convinced you really don't know what you're talking about, and I'm also concerned the dealers / mechanics you speak to also have zero clues about this as well.

The Engine Clutch Actuator is NOT the same as the Dual Clutch transmission. ZERO.

This is what's so maddening. I have a 2017 Hyundai Ioniq, and every dealer in my town has zero clues about this service. Or some zealous service adviser will talk to the "hybrid specialist" who quotes $250 - $300 to do this service, which is insane and they are probably looking at the Dual Clutch fluid change.

I also spoke to the local Kia dealers in the hopes the service advisers there would know about this. I ask for the most experienced service advisers, and every one looks at me blankly in the eye and say "I've been here for 10-15 years, and I've NEVER heard of this service and no other customers have needed this".

Are you kidding me???

Kia / Hyunda is failing the Niro / Ioniq owners by not informing the dealers of this service. This is why I will go the DIY route of sucking up the fluid and changing it.

I do NOT trust the dealers to do this right, EVEN if you paid them $300 to do it. I would demand to watch the mechanic doing this as I'm pretty sure they'll either do the clutch fluid, or nothing at all, and just give you a receipt that it's done.

Kia Niro / Hyundai Ioniq owners CANNOT trust the dealers for this service....so many of them are completely clueless. Just because you have a receipt that they did this, and you paid $89, $150, $300 to do this, means NOTHING.
 

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I change the clutch fluid in my Niro at 15k intervals (every other oil change). It is just a drain and fill - no bleeding necessary. The improvement in shifting and take off is immediate.
The "improvement in shifting and take off"???? you are talking about the Dual Clutch transmission, not the Engine Clutch Actuator -- that has zero to do with shifting and take off!!

This is so maddening and frustrating. So many people seem to think they know what this is, when they really don't know this topic at all.

The Engine Clutch Actuator is NOT the Dual Clutch transmission.

I'd like to beat this info into the dealers' brains. So many automatically assume it's the transmission, even when I give them a 2 minute explanation of what the Engine Clutch Actuator is.... they seem to have zero listening skills and start blabbing about the transmission. Insane.
 

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My dealer didn't want to actually say he didn't think it was necessary but I could tell from his body language. He knew what I was talking about and it cost $85 less the 15% off coupon I had. I think I will subscribe to gbillyg theory, and forget about it in the future.
 

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My dealer didn't want to actually say he didn't think it was necessary but I could tell from his body language. He knew what I was talking about and it cost $85 less the 15% off coupon I had. I think I will subscribe to gbillyg theory, and forget about it in the future.
The problem is do the dealers really know better than the engineers of the vehicle? Time will tell. I will be very ticked off if something should fail and not be covered under warranty because dealers were too ignorant of this service item.
 
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