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P w/wo brake ~0.6a X ~400V = ~240W
N w/wo brake ~0.6a X ~400V = ~240W
D w brake ~0.6a X ~400V = ~240W
D wo brake ~3.0a xv~400V = ~1200W (creep mode)

Just put the brake on when in D and you won't draw any "creep" power.
Thanks for that. Color me skeptical though - seems to me that an attitude change in the car when I go from N to D requires extra power. I'd like to see that run on the HEV. No idea why results would differ though. One other possibility - a hard press on the brake activating hill hold may be different from a light press. Also, what happens while you are creeping and ever so lightly press the brakes, not enough to stop the car. Still ~1200W?

There are a lot of folks on the Ioniq forum convinced there is a power draw who do shift to neutral. Certainly no harm done by the practice but I had to be convinced as well and it took me a while as it doesn't seem to make sense from what programming the car properly should be capable of.

Are your lights on? If not, amazing that the base energy draw for systems and entertainment are that high.
 

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Thanks for that. Color me skeptical though - seems to me that an attitude change in the car when I go from N to D requires extra power. I'd like to see that run on the HEV. No idea why results would differ though. One other possibility - a hard press on the brake activating hill hold may be different from a light press. Also, what happens while you are creeping and ever so lightly press the brakes, not enough to stop the car. Still ~1200W?

There are a lot of folks on the Ioniq forum convinced there is a power draw who do shift to neutral. Certainly no harm done by the practice but I had to be convinced as well and it took me a while as it doesn't seem to make sense from what programming the car properly should be capable of.

Are your lights on? If not, amazing that the base energy draw for systems and entertainment are that high.
I'll do further testing soon but i'm not surprised that the car is programmed to turn off the motor when the brake is on and the car is not moving. The alternative makes no sense at all.



Regarding the 200+ watt idle power. Maybe not too surprising considering the
inverter is capable of driving 45000 watts. Must have some beefy electronics
with some idle current.
 

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Regarding the 200+ watt idle power. Maybe not too surprising considering the
inverter is capable of driving 45000 watts. Must have some beefy electronics
with some idle current.
Makes sense to me. [email protected] ~400V is just .5A. To put it in perspective, 200W is ~.5% of the max output of the inverter. That's not bad for a no load condition especially given that there are other things running.
 

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Sorry. What other things? That's a lot for modern electronics. More than my computer and screen. More than many large screen TVs. The car has a dash and a touch screen lit by LEDs. A few odd processing units, also low draw, especially when car is stationary.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
I have the Canadian EV SX Touring which is close to the EX Premium in USA. Off course we get the heat pump for free, and also health care for free. But I digress. ;)

I have driven almost 7500 km by now and the average according to the car is 16.1 kWh/100km. Yeah I know metric, pain in the a.. So that is an average of almost 3.9 miles/kWh recorded over 4700 miles. Now consider that I commute about 50 miles per day of which roughly 40 miles is on the only highway we have in our part of the world. But it has an HOV lane, which us EV drivers are allowed to use. So lots of 75 mph, I average about 62 mph on the HOV lane. Which means I sometimes need to make swift passings because some folks actually stick to the speed limit (which is below my average 0:) ) And that driving style consumes energy.

In the city I am forced to more moderate speeds and accelerations due to traffic density and therefore average around 4.4 miles/kWh. Still not that impressive if you listen to PHEV drivers, but keep in mind that the EV has a much more powerful battery and motor, which begs to be used. And our city is everything from flat, and who said you should not accelerate when going uphill?

I do drive in ECO mode. Not to save kWh, but to limit my speed (set at 75 mph), otherwise I would be in real trouble.
The kWh is dirt cheap here. At home I pay US$0.085, most public chargers still offer the charging for free! So with an avg of almost 17k miles per year, I am paying US$30 per month on electricity for charging (do almost all of my charging at home). I used to have the HEV which costs me US$150 per month on gas for the same distance (yup, those gas drinkers pay carbon taxes at the pump (about US$0.26/gallon :eek:), electricity here is 95% renewable non CO2 emitting - hydro). So it feels great to have a sporty car, environment friendly and super cheap on the variable costs.

Hope this helps. :)
Mileage/kwh is very strongly determined by highway vs city. When I posted that I got 4.8 miles/kwh above that was based on max regen and about 2/3 local driving vs 1/3 highway. I found that highway driveway drives down the mileage, more so than I ever saw on my old Prius hybrid. You are apparently doing lots more highway in Canada, and regen won't help much anyway on a highway.

All that said, the mileage comparing to gasoline cars (even compared to the Prius) is still far, far greater. We're paying about 10.5 cents/kwh and gasoline around here is about $2.70US, so I calculate comparable mileage at about 115 miles/gallon. Comparing to the energy potential in gasoline rather than costs it's 160 miles/gallon, but I think the former is a more accurate measurement.
 

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So I took my car out for a drive for the first time in over a week, and guess what? On the issue of power used at a stop, both sides may not be wrong. With a light push on the brake, the car changed attitude and the brakes groaned a bit as slack was taken up or released between D and N. But with a hard press, I could not discern any difference. Charles hopefully will be able to confirm that.

So that brings back up the hill hold function I believe. Anyone know how it works? Fully mechanical, or computer operated? I had a couple panic stops in my first three months of ownership and the way the brakes worked was seriously scary. They stayed on for a second or two (still maximum deceleration) after I took my foot off the brakes. I thought for sure the car behind me was going to hit me. Pretty sure now this must also be hill hold. If it is from a computer command, that is some seriously bad programming.
 

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So that brings back up the hill hold function I believe. Anyone know how it works? Fully mechanical, or computer operated?
I believe it's computer operated mechanical. :D

By that I mean the brakes themselves are completely mechanical (hydraulically activated of course). Only the e-Niro has an electronic parking brake, so that leaves the 4 wheel brakes as the only method of holding the car on a hill. I don't think it's the regen capability that holds it, because I can feel a distinct release when I use it stopped on my driveway. If it was the regen holding it in place, I would not expect to feel any sort of release. Plus, I don't think the HEV or PHEV has strong enough regen to hold the car like many EVs can. I have't experienced a panic stop with the car, so I can't say anything about its behavior under those circumstances. But I would expect every car with emergency braking assist (many have it now) to take a split second before releasing the brakes in case it was a matter of the driver's foot slipping off the pedal. If the car behind did hit you, it would have been their fault for following too close. :p
 

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Mileage/kwh is very strongly determined by highway vs city. When I posted that I got 4.8 miles/kwh above that was based on max regen and about 2/3 local driving vs 1/3 highway. I found that highway driveway drives down the mileage, more so than I ever saw on my old Prius hybrid. You are apparently doing lots more highway in Canada, and regen won't help much anyway on a highway.

All that said, the mileage comparing to gasoline cars (even compared to the Prius) is still far, far greater. We're paying about 10.5 cents/kwh and gasoline around here is about $2.70US, so I calculate comparable mileage at about 115 miles/gallon. Comparing to the energy potential in gasoline rather than costs it's 160 miles/gallon, but I think the former is a more accurate measurement.
How do you calculate comparable mileage? Gallon price / kWh price * consumption in miles/kWh ?
In your case $ 2.70 / $ 0.105 * 4.8 miles/kWh = 123 mpg ?
 

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level parking lot

P w/wo brake ~0.6a X ~400V = ~240W
N w/wo brake ~0.6a X ~400V = ~240W
D w brake ~0.6a X ~400V = ~240W
D wo brake ~3.0a xv~400V = ~1200W (creep mode)

Just put the brake on when in D and you won't draw any "creep" power.
lowest standby current 0.4-0.5a
with drl ~ 0.7a
with head lights ~1.1a (high or low)

creep power goes to zero with slight pedal pressure

On incline

Brake on 0.6a
Hold (~3sec) 1.1a
 

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Reviving this thread a bit...

During Aug-Sep I had per ECU a calculated average of 21.5 kWh/100km energy discharged (there is a Cumulative Energy Discharged counter, I took note of the odo meter at the begin and end of the interval).
The long term avg consumption on the car display is about 17 kWh/100km, so I assume the average displayed takes into account the energy going back into the battery with regenerative braking. I can't find a counter on the ECU showing regen energy. There is a similar counter for Cumulative Energy Charged and that one is pretty much in lock step with the discharge counter. So I assume the charge counter is what goes into the battery and is not just the output from external charger. In my setup I can't measure the kWh from the house into the car as I have a simple EVSE installed without any measuring option.

Is my conclusion right that the difference between displayed average and the ECU counter (~4 kWh/100km) shows the regen energy?
 
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