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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2 of them anyway. I live in a new neighborhood with LOTS of new construction. So I get nails in tires more than normal. 2 of the stock tires have already been replaced due to nails too close to the sidewalls. However, 2 other tires somehow lasted to 62,000 miles. One of them was loosing air so I went to get it patched. They tire shop then found a nail in the other stock tire, and tread depth on both tires was down to about 4/32. So instead of just patching them, I went ahead and opted to replace them both.

Considering that I tend to drive the car fast through corners, and if possible I take the Texas Autobahn toll road(toll road 130) where the car averages 80-85 mph for 80 miles, I’m quit happy with that!!

The new tires are Michelin(can’t remember the model) since I’ve had nothing but good luck from them and so has my family.
 

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I think tire wear and rolling resistance increases very little with speed, at worst in a linear fashion, unlike aero drag. I'm still expecting 80,000 miles from mine, halfway there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
One thing that does increase with speed is tire temperature. The faster you go the hotter the tire gets, and high speed for long distances really keep tires at a high temperature. You always see more tire blowouts in the summer time because of this.

Regardless of that though, if you rotate your tires correctly(I had mine rotated at every oil change) then I see no reason why the stock tires won’t last for 80,000 miles.
 

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I agree that rotating tires will provide for the greatest life expectancy possible but there are many more variables to consider.
I also agree that increased speed will increase temperature of the tire and maybe more "blowouts" occur in the summer time...but, the excessive (tire blowing) heat is not caused by ambient temperature, rather by the increased sidewall action due to a tire running at low pressure.
Add an overloaded car to low tire pressure and you have the recipe for "tire disaster".
 

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One thing that does increase with speed is tire temperature. The faster you go the hotter the tire gets, and high speed for long distances really keep tires at a high temperature.
Easy to adjust the initial pressure. While likely different in desert climates, the highest pressure I've seen in 90+ degree days with full sun heating the asphalt mid afternoon is 43 psi at 65 mph. This is from a cold fill of 36 psi. Yes, "max psi" is 44 psi cold fill, but that accounts for increased running pressure (so 50/52 psi) and has a safety margin of about 20%. So for normal use, blowoffs should be very uncommon as standard engineering safety margins and regulations do their thing.

I also suspect blowoffs are overly diagnosed. Once you have a rapid pressure decrease and it takes a while for you to stop, tires often dismount, mimicking a blowoff.

As an aside, with bicycle rims and tires, I often find some tires almost impossible to mount or remove. I've changed rims and or tires for that very reason (deep section rims help a lot with these issues). I've also seen the opposite where I do blow off the tires. I would expect car rim OD and tire IDs to be very standardized and consistent across brands meaning blowoffs due to a poor tire/rim match very unlikely.
 
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