Kia Niro Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just getting to know my new car - loving it so far and an upgrade to the Honda Jazz/Fit I had previously. I am loving the car and the neighbours' jealousy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Welcome! What model did you decide on?
Hi jmurphEV! I got the Kia Niro 2 - which is the base model here in UK (i.e. there is no Kia Niro 1) It has smaller wheels than the Niro 3 and Niro 4, meaning better fuel economy. I am disabled and got the car on the Motability scheme in the UK, meaning very cheap leasing prices. I guess you drive the Niro EV version? In the UK we call that the e-Niro.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
Hi jmurphEV! I got the Kia Niro 2 - which is the base model here in UK (i.e. there is no Kia Niro 1) It has smaller wheels than the Niro 3 and Niro 4, meaning better fuel economy. I am disabled and got the car on the Motability scheme in the UK, meaning very cheap leasing prices. I guess you drive the Niro EV version? In the UK we call that the e-Niro.
I have the plug-in hybrid Niro, the BEV was not an option when I purchased back in '18. For me that was the best of both worlds, my daily commute is 11 miles each way so that works perfectly with the PHEV Niro's 26 mile battery range. It sounds like the Niro 2 is roughly similar to the FE trim here in the states, although as we have found as more people join this forum from around the world the range of models and features available in different areas is completely amazing and seemingly random.

Good luck with your new car!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I had considered the PHEV but it would have required a hefty initial payment on the lease, whereas the hybrid version required no initial payment. It was unlikely that I could recover that extra cost over the three year lease.

I must say that the 2020 version of the Niro is way better for disabled drivers than earlier versions of the Niro. It now has an electronic parking brake rather than the old-fashioned foot operated parking brake. The elimination of that foot-operated brake made adaptation for my disabilities a lot easier. The paddle-operated regeneration means deceleration can be achieved without using the brakes, at least most of the time, and the new lever-operated reclining seats make it easier to change between the front seats for me. The safety pack is now standard on the 2020 Niro so it passes safety tests (Euro NCAP) with full marks and includes Lane Follow Assist, which could prove useful on longer journeys.

My wife is keen to try the car but we need to put learner plates at the front and rear and the magnetic ones would not affix (I assume the lids for the engine and boot (trunk) are made of aluminium) So, just now awaiting a delivery of those L-plates from Amazon.

I guess you live in Maryland and work in Washington DC?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,569 Posts
Hopefully the lane assist works far better on the 2020 than my 2018 - I've read that on higher priced Kias that improvements have been made but have yet to see confirming reviews. On my 2018 year and trim, I paid $1,500 for a package of safety features including what is called here lane keep assist. Wasn't worth it. LKA ping pongs in lane, keeps to the left of the lane when it is not, and crossed the center line fairly frequently and knows it as it give me a lane departure warning. So far when emergency braking has been activated, it has been wrong every time which is a rather startling event for the unsuspecting operator - potentially causing a rear end accident had someone been tailgating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
It;s a bit disconcerting that these active 'safety features' don't seem to work properly. Their existence means that all Niros now get a full 5 stars in Euro NCAP safety tests.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
886 Posts
Yeah, the early lane keeping functions were a bit of a joke. My Subaru with Eyesight did the ping pong as well. But in fairness, I'm not certain they actually stated their purpose was to self center the vehicle in the lane. It was more a watchdog that provided a nudge back to center when the car strayed too far left or right. That said, I think I read (unless I'm confusing it with another vehicle) that the 2020 version was much better at actually tracking in the lane center, and doesn't bounce from side to side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
I had considered the PHEV but it would have required a hefty initial payment on the lease, whereas the hybrid version required no initial payment. It was unlikely that I could recover that extra cost over the three year lease.

I must say that the 2020 version of the Niro is way better for disabled drivers than earlier versions of the Niro. It now has an electronic parking brake rather than the old-fashioned foot operated parking brake. The elimination of that foot-operated brake made adaptation for my disabilities a lot easier. The paddle-operated regeneration means deceleration can be achieved without using the brakes, at least most of the time, and the new lever-operated reclining seats make it easier to change between the front seats for me. The safety pack is now standard on the 2020 Niro so it passes safety tests (Euro NCAP) with full marks and includes Lane Follow Assist, which could prove useful on longer journeys.

My wife is keen to try the car but we need to put learner plates at the front and rear and the magnetic ones would not affix (I assume the lids for the engine and boot (trunk) are made of aluminium) So, just now awaiting a delivery of those L-plates from Amazon.

I guess you live in Maryland and work in Washington DC?
There is a $4,500 tax credit for the battery in the PHEV here is the US that offsets the cost of it, putting it on par with the hybrid. I love the fact that my commute is within the battery range and I am saving lots of money with this version.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top