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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi having just purchased a 2018 model PHEV Niro I’m a little confused with the advantages of installing a home charging point as against just using the plugin facility of the mains connecting lead, is the advantage purely of convenience or is the home charging point cheaper/quicker to use?
 

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What do you mean by "plugin facility of the mains connecting lead "?

The PHEV will charge at 220V, 16 amps max. I picked up a $200 CDN charger off of Amazon and that works perfectly. Some more expensive units can adjust the charge times, track electricity usage and start and stop with an app. But besides tracking electricity usage, you can do everything else with the EVO app.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What do you mean by "plugin facility of the mains connecting lead "?

The PHEV will charge at 220V, 16 amps max. I picked up a $200 CDN charger off of Amazon and that works perfectly. Some more expensive units can adjust the charge times, track electricity usage and start and stop with an app. But besides tracking electricity usage, you can do everything else with the EVO app.
here in the UK the PHEV comes with a cable that can connect to the normal mains socket of the household ring main supply as well as the standard connection lead for home charging points.
 

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Is that 110 or 220 volts? How many amps?

Here in Canada our standard outlet is 110 volts and 15 amps (12 amp useable IIRC). The charger we get with the car will charge up the PHEV car from empty in 9 or 10 hours. With a 220 volt 16 amp charger it takes 2 hours and 15 minutes. But this requires a "special" wall plug.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is that 110 or 220 volts? How many amps?

Here in Canada our standard outlet is 110 volts and 15 amps (12 amp useable IIRC). The charger we get with the car will charge up the PHEV car from empty in 9 or 10 hours. With a 220 volt 16 amp charger it takes 2 hours and 15 minutes. But this requires a "special" wall plug.
We are at 240v here, up to 30amp from the household consumer unit but the ring main is usually at 13amp, so if I connect to the ring main I can charge from zero in 2 and a half hours, but I don’t know how my charge will be affected if I connect a home charging point to the consumer unit.
 

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My breaker box is in my garage. I got one of those 240V chargers off of Amazon and installed a plug for it in 15 minutes for about $30.
 

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Yep, everyone needs to note the OP is in the UK, with 240v mains. Here in the US we have 120v mains, so upgrading to a Level 2 EVSE makes a world of difference speed-wise charging. But assuming the EVSE that they receive with their car in the UK is capable of 16 amps, then there's nothing to gain by adding a separate EVSE. However, if @BobP 's EVSE is only 12 amps, like the one we get in the US, then adding a EVSE that provides at least 16 amps would bring a noticeable speed improvement in charging. That's 33% more current, so it would charge about 1/3 faster. Not monumental, but might still be worth it. The car can accept 16 amps, so having an EVSE that provides the full power means a better chance to drive in EV mode as much as possible.
 
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Here in Ireland we have the same ring main (13amp) as in the UK. When using the "emergency" charger supplied with the car the load on the ring main is limited to approx 1.7KW (as opposed to the 3kw maximum) which gives a charging time from 0-100% for a PHEV of 5hrs. The reason for the limitation is to prevent overloading the ring main when other appliances are used on the same circuit.

The dedicated home charger unit is connected directly to the consumer unit and can therefore provide up to 7KW - the PHEV can only accept 3KW and the charge time will be approx 2.5hr. The only advantage of a dedicated charger is speed. Mine was installed for free (!) under an incentive scheme here in Ireland. If you are considering eventually upgrading the PHEV to the e-Niro (as I did) then the home charger is essential.
 

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If you are considering eventually upgrading the PHEV to the e-Niro (as I did) then the home charger is essential.
This is exactly why I installed a JuiceBox 40. Even though my PHEV only accepts 3.6 kW, I'm now ready for an EV that can accept up to 9.6 kW. And I gone mine for free from my utility as well. I just paid 20% of the install, which I felt was still too much since it was such a short run and he just used the same breaker I was already using for 16 amp EVSE I had bought on Amazon. Probably the easiest install he had ever done. :D
 

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My $.02...I've had 2 Leafsand now a 2019 PHEV Niro. The dedicated home charging unit is fast. Even with the 204V provided unit that Kia gives, the dedicated charger will work faster. That is probably the only benefit.

Dedicated home chargers are prevalent, inexpensive and relatively easy to install or have installed.

Bottom line for our UK friend...speed is the only real incentive (and of course wrapping up and storing the charger in your car after every charge session unless you buy a spare).
 

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I still use the slow 110V Kia plugin charger. Since I WFH and I had a limited car usage, I had less motivation to do an upgrade.

To be able to use a 240V EV charger at home, I need to upgrade the panel and add one socket that can support ~40-50A in the garage (right now, the drier uses the only 240V socket in the garage and it is 30A only). I think, with its current situation, it will not pass the city permit and I need to spend ~1500-2000 bucks to fix those issues (on top of the EV charger price). The city also may not accept sharing the same socket between dryer and EV charger.

I thought several times to do the upgrades by DYI, but I think, the city permit needs such modifications by a certified electrician.
 

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There is nothing unsafe about using a dryer outlet to operate a level 2 charger on the niro. The niro only pulls 16 amps max, even on a 220 volt charger. Just be sure to use a quality level 2 charger, and if using a splitter cable to not have to swap plugs between dryer and charger, be sure to get one with sufficiently large wire. If you can't trust yourself to only use one or the other, Dryerbuddy makes an auto switching splitter box to prevent overdrawing from the outlet.
 

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I think, Kia EV charger is 12A at 120V (the origin Kia L1 charger coming with the car) and 32A at 240V (L2 charger). It is definitely not 16A. Where did you find 16A at 240V?

EVGO level 2 charger in the charging station gives 7.2kW at 240V --> 7200/240=30A --> well above 16A.
 

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Yes, the PHEV will draw 16 amps maximum at 240V. The EV can draw 32 amps. Some EVs can draw even more, as several models now come with chargers over 11kW, which is about 48 amps.
 

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Sorry to butt into this thread. I just picked up a 2021 Niro EV. We already have a Tesla wall charger that is set to 80 amp output. Will the internals of the Niro EV be able to deal with the 80 amps it gets offered? Does anyone have experience charging their Niro off of that with a Tesla to J1772 adapter?

Thanks for any insights you all can provide.
 

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It should not be an issue, because the Niro EV should consume only 32A of the current in the output. Anyway, I have not tried it and my main issue is current limitation in my garage circuit. If you want to be sure, before charging your car, contact Kia and ask your question by email or phone. The customer services typically respond quickly. Please also update us here about the outcome.
 
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