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Discussion Starter #1
My employer is concerned that plugging in my hybrid niro all day may draw too many amps from the only available 110 circuit outside which is shared with other equipment. Before I can start charging he want to know how many amps level 1 charging will draw per hour? I can only find info about kwh. Any info about how many amps? Tbh I'm not sure if I'm even asking the question correctly.
 

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You can set the PHEV's level 1 charge setting to 8, 10 or 12 amps. I set it at 10 amps because I charge overnight to get a full charge so charging time is a non-factor for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. Not sure if that's the answer the boss is looking for but appreciated. How would you change that setting. I don't recall seeing the option.
 

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The amp draw is almost certainly what your employer is asking for - because it is probably only a 15 amp circuit that you're plugging into. If your car draws 12 amps, then there would only be 3 amps left for the other equipment. But if your car draws 8 amps, then there are 7 amps left for the other equipment.


There's a button on the underside of the charger unit, I think you press it for 2-5 seconds while the charger is plugged in, and it cycles between L, M, and H modes (8, 10, and 12 amp)
 

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P = I × V
P=power (in kilowatts kw)
I = current (in Amps)
V = voltage.

Energy used is power time time because power is energy per unit time.

E (energy used) = P * t

Example. 100 watt (P) lightbulb on a 110 Volt circuit running for 5 hours.

Energy = 110 * 5 = 550 watt-hrs. A kwh is a kilowatter hour so 1000 watt-hours. You used 0.55 kwh of electricity. You are billed on a kwh basis so if your utility rate is $0.15 per kwh then cost = $0.15 * 0.55 = $0.0825 for 8 and 1/4 cents.

P = I x V so that means I = P/V.

I = (100 watts)/(110 volts) = 0.909 Amps.

Thus for easy calculation a 1 kw pull of power translates to 9.09 Amps (the above number times 10). The settings are 8, 10, or 12 amps on your charger. which in watts works out to be:

8 Amp setting: 8*110=880 watts or 0.88 kw (I've got some rounding going on).
10 Amp setting: 10*110 = 1100 watts or 1.1 kw.
12 Amp setting: 12*110 = 1320 watts or 1.32 kw.

So the next thing you need to know is what size circuit you will be plugging into which is measured by the amps on the breaker that shuts that outlet off. It may shut of several outlets. For example in your house in your breaker box/panel you may have something like a switch labeled 30 amps and a sticky note to the side that says 'living room outlets'. If there's 4 outlets in that room then they are sharing that same segment of wiring and the combined 'pull' of power (amps) cannot exceed 30 or the breaker will trip.

So if you first find out what the amperage is on that circuit (let's use 30 as an example) then you look at what else is hooked into that circuit, you simply sum the amps after calculating it from the watt ratings. Or add all the watts together then convert the total watts into total amps by dividing by voltage (110).

If yours is 12 and it's a 30 amp breaker and the rest of the loads on that breaker add up to 10 amps then you'll be safely under the threshold. However electricity voltage and such is not necessarily a constant and if you run up close to that limit and hiccups or flutters in power will cause that breaker to trip which is why usually the breaker is an amperage that has extra room to spare.

Funny story. We owned a house once where the toaster, the lights, and the microwave were all on the same breaker (all separate outlets though). You could run any 2 of the three. Put some toast down and put something else in the microwave? Sure...then try flicking on the lights and poof....in the dark.
 
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