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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all I have a 2010 Honda Insight and looking at the Niro hybrids and Phev. The newer hybrids can travel a mile or more on EV depending on terrain and light throttle. I wanted to know if that’s the case with the 2018+ Niro Hybrid. It is much cheaper than the PHEV version which is why I’m considering it over the PHEV
 

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2019 Niro PHEV EX Premium
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While it's possible to drive a hybrid solely in EV mode, you won't go far and any sort of hill will immediately start the engine. I'd say a mile is going to be about it. For the PHEV, I can of course speak with some authority. The PHEV is EPA rated at 26 miles, and that assumes the HVAC is turned off, otherwise it shows 24 miles. However, in real life I get 28-30 miles regularly, and have hit a max of 34 miles, all with the HVAC on. Terrain plays a large part on how far you can go.

Even the PHEV will start the engine if you press the throttle far enough. It only has a 60HP electric motor, so tall and/or long hills might need the gas assist to maintain the speed limit. But even with amount of use of the gas engine, I still feel the PHEV is worth the additional cost. During the summer, when heat isn't needed, I can go two months easily and probably go all summer without buying gas. You can see my overall gas consumption in my Fuelly badge in my sig line. And that is not done by driving for MPG. I drive normally, and try my best to not impede traffic. But driving a hybrid has changed my driving style for the better. Probably getting old has something to do with that as well. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
While it's possible to drive a hybrid solely in EV mode, you won't go far and any sort of hill will immediately start the engine. I'd say a mile is going to be about it. For the PHEV, I can of course speak with some authority. The PHEV is EPA rated at 26 miles, and that assumes the HVAC is turned off, otherwise it shows 24 miles. However, in real life I get 28-30 miles regularly, and have hit a max of 34 miles, all with the HVAC on. Terrain plays a large part on how far you can go.

Even the PHEV will start the engine if you press the throttle far enough. It only has a 60HP electric motor, so tall and/or long hills might need the gas assist to maintain the speed limit. But even with amount of use of the gas engine, I still feel the PHEV is worth the additional cost. During the summer, when heat isn't needed, I can go two months easily and probably go all summer without buying gas. You can see my overall gas consumption in my Fuelly badge in my sig line. And that is not done by driving for MPG. I drive normally, and try my best to not impede traffic. But driving a hybrid has changed my driving style for the better. Probably getting old has something to do with that as well. :D
Ok great. I really like the options on the Niro Phev EX premium, just hate not having a spare tire... for now I’ll drive the honda till the wheels fall off!!
 

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Yeah, it's very common for a PHEV or EV to not have a spare. The battery takes up the space, or the battery displaced something else into the spare space.
 

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2019 NIRO PHEV EX
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I have a Niro PHEV EX.

I carry a professional plug tire repair kit along with a Jack and lug wrench in the vehicle. I do have a spare that I keep in our garage. If I couldn't fix the leaking tire around town I would have someone bring me the spare. If I have to travel distance I will take the spare with me and secure it in the back of the vehicle.
 

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I have a Niro PHEV EX.

I carry a professional plug tire repair kit along with a Jack and lug wrench in the vehicle. I do have a spare that I keep in our garage. If I couldn't fix the leaking tire around town I would have someone bring me the spare. If I have to travel distance I will take the spare with me and secure it in the back of the vehicle.
I think you should go with the "spare tire" whether someone brings it to you or you carry in the rear for long distances.
I have only used the slime once and it worked well for me.
I also repaired a couple tires that had been slimed, when working in the trade and that was not a fun experience.
There is no such thing as a "professional plug kit" because plugs are not acceptable repairs for tires. Tires can only be repaired if a small hole in the tread area and it must be a plug/patch combo which requires removal of the tire from the rim.
 

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Based on a quick web search, plugging a tire may be legal/acceptable in the US. But not as a permanent repair, and not designed for sidewall punctures. I've only had flats with quality tires (as opposed to the cheap tires I had when I was young/broke) extremely rarely, and they split between tread and sidewall punctures. My Niro is the first car I've ever had without a real spare tire. Based on previous history, it's highly unlikely I would experience a blowout that the goop couldn't get me off the road and to a tire shop. Naturally, never say never, and I'm getting old enough I probably shouldn't be changing a tire on the road side anyway.
 

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Based on a quick web search, plugging a tire may be legal/acceptable in the US. But not as a permanent repair, and not designed for sidewall punctures. I've only had flats with quality tires (as opposed to the cheap tires I had when I was young/broke) extremely rarely, and they split between tread and sidewall punctures. My Niro is the first car I've ever had without a real spare tire. Based on previous history, it's highly unlikely I would experience a blowout that the goop couldn't get me off the road and to a tire shop. Naturally, never say never, and I'm getting old enough I probably shouldn't be changing a tire on the road side anyway.
Sidewalls can never be plugged or patched legally.
Plugging a tire to get you to a repair shop is fine but not sure it is worth the effort or expense.
You make a very correct statement when he say "not as a permanent repair".
I am OK with the slime but hope I never have to use it.
 

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Sidewalls can never be plugged or patched legally.
Plugging a tire to get you to a repair shop is fine but not sure it is worth the effort or expense.
You make a very correct statement when he say "not as a permanent repair".
I am OK with the slime but hope I never have to use it.
Based on a quick web search, plugging a tire may be legal/acceptable in the US. But not as a permanent repair, and not designed for sidewall punctures. I've only had flats with quality tires (as opposed to the cheap tires I had when I was young/broke) extremely rarely, and they split between tread and sidewall punctures. My Niro is the first car I've ever had without a real spare tire. Based on previous history, it's highly unlikely I would experience a blowout that the goop couldn't get me off the road and to a tire shop. Naturally, never say never, and I'm getting old enough I probably shouldn't be changing a tire on the road side anyway.
Sidewalls can never be plugged or patched legally.
Plugging a tire to get you to a repair shop is fine but not sure it is worth the effort or expense.
You make a very correct statement when he say "not as a permanent repair".
I am OK with the slime but hope I never have to use it.
I don't trust plugs, one time on the highway a garage plugged my tire on my cargo van and and that got me 60 km .My 19 niro hybrid has a donut and I made sure upon purchase .
 

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2020 Niro PHEV LXS
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Depending on where you are, a PHEV may be cheaper because it qualifies for state and federal rebates as an EV the hybrid does not.
 

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I've picked up numerous nails, screws, etc. over the years that resulted in tread punctures that were permanently cured with a plug until the tire wore out. On my 2018 Hyundai Kona--just before I traded it in for my Niro--I had another puncture and took it to the tire shop to get repaired. They called me into the shop to take a look because it was a situation they'd never seen before. The screw had gone right through a plug where the tire had been previously repaired. They said that the law wouldn't allow them to plug a hole that was within a certain distance of another plug, so I had to get a new tire. The folks at TireRack honored the road hazard warranty that had come with the tires when I bought them, so there was a brand new tire on the car when I traded it in.

As for the spare on the Niro, I went ahead and bought the donut spare kit off Ebay and then a tire for it on Ebay as well. Without looking it up, I think I spent a total of around $150. It's an insurance policy in my eyes. I can't remember the last time I actually changed a tire. I've just keep a good air compressor in the car, and if I find a tire is leaking I just air it up and drive it to a tire shop for repair. So far I've been lucky enough to have that keep working for me, and haven't had any sidewall problems.
 
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