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K, I do actually understand it. What I don't get is the levels. When you pull the right paddle level goes up; press the left one and the level goes down. What's the difference between the different levels? What's the reason for having 3 levels?
 

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Think of what is happening when you push the brake pedal. You get an infinite number of regenerative braking levels until your speed falls below 10 kph, or you panic brake at a level higher than the motor can slow your car by turning momentum into electricity (which then is absorbed by the battery).

Reason for 3 levels of regeneration controlled by paddles? Who the heck knows? Some marketing guy or engineer decided this was a practical number that might meet most of the preferences of those who might like to use paddles. The difference in the levels results in a different level of braking per regeneration level - exactly what happens with using the brake pedal instead. You select either way the level that feels "good" to you, or results in the amount of slowing needed in your particular driving scenario.
 

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K, I do actually understand it. What I don't get is the levels. When you pull the right paddle level goes up; press the left one and the level goes down. What's the difference between the different levels? What's the reason for having 3 levels?
FWIW, I read that the new Kia EV6 will have six regenerative braking levels.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Reason for 3 levels of regeneration controlled by paddles? Who the heck knows? Some marketing guy or engineer decided this was a practical number that might meet most of the preferences of those who might like to use paddles. The difference in the levels results in a different level of braking per regeneration level - exactly what happens with using the brake pedal instead. You select either way the level that feels "good" to you, or results in the amount of slowing needed in your particular driving scenario.
Ah. K cool. I was worried that I wasn't using appropriately. Good to know it's about personal preference and a matter of using the right level at some appropriate time
 

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Ah. K cool. I was worried that I wasn't using appropriately. Good to know it's about personal preference and a matter of using the right level at some appropriate time
Earlier on in this forum and other hybrid forums, owners complained mightily about not having paddles. While paddles might be able to be used more effectively on PHEVs and BEVs (because the larger batteries allow more regen), it has now trickled down to hybrids. I suspect no matter the car, very few owners use this feature, especially the silent majority who do not post on forums.

Originally paddles for shifting gears were found in race cars, where keeping your hands on the steering wheel was critical. Then muscle cars. Then economy cars? Pretty silly. Normal road driving is perfectly compatible with manual shifting, and for electrified cars (other than Teslas which do not do "blended" braking), the brake pedal offers an infinite range of regen versus the stepped affair with paddles, whether three or six levels. Lots of personal preference here, not much functional difference. The biggest edge case is "one" pedal driving where just taking your foot off the accelerator will give you any level of slowing all the way down to a full stop. Some owners truly love that way of driving. Still, I think they are in the minority.
 

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I love the paddles. I am driving coaches for a living and these vehicles have paddles for braking for a long time. Since last summer I have the PHEV with paddles and so glad with them: finally I can brake/slow-down in a similar way as I am doing all day.
 

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K, I do actually understand it. What I don't get is the levels. When you pull the right paddle level goes up; press the left one and the level goes down. What's the difference between the different levels? What's the reason for having 3 levels?
Earlier on in this forum and other hybrid forums, owners complained mightily about not having paddles. While paddles might be able to be used more effectively on PHEVs and BEVs (because the larger batteries allow more regen), it has now trickled down to hybrids. I suspect no matter the car, very few owners use this feature, especially the silent majority who do not post on forums.

Originally paddles for shifting gears were found in race cars, where keeping your hands on the steering wheel was critical. Then muscle cars. Then economy cars? Pretty silly. Normal road driving is perfectly compatible with manual shifting, and for electrified cars (other than Teslas which do not do "blended" braking), the brake pedal offers an infinite range of regen versus the stepped affair with paddles, whether three or six levels. Lots of personal preference here, not much functional difference. The biggest edge case is "one" pedal driving where just taking your foot off the accelerator will give you any level of slowing all the way down to a full stop. Some owners truly love that way of driving. Still, I think they are in the minority.
I have a 2020 Niro EV and drive with the regen braking on the highest (Level 3). It allows me to drive using just the accelerator to slow down. It's almost like driving a golf cart.
 

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I am a nuclear trained submarine qualified electricians mate 1st class and an engineer with 40 years of engineering experience. Back to the basic laws of physics - Faraday's Law. If you have a magnetic field (the rotor of the permanent magnet motor)., a rotating (moving) magnetic field, and a conductor, depending on the windings and regulation you can have EITHER a motor OR a generator. A slowing Niro then drives the motor which then becomes a generator and that generator then is resisted thru COUNTER ELECTROMOTIVE FORCE (CEMF) and this slows the motor/generator rotor and slows the Niro down. The generated current then charges the traction battery. The paddles control the field of the motor/generator which then varies the regenerator braking and thus recharge of the battery. Simple/basic if the fundamentals are understood..
 

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Ah. K cool. I was worried that I wasn't using it appropriately. Good to know it's about personal preference and a matter of using the right level at some appropriate time
Think of it as similar to downshifting when driving a manual transmission. 'Braking' with the regenerative paddle shifters, is using the electric motor to slow the car down, not, as I understand it, the car's brakes. Indeed, on my previous Niro, a 2017 hybrid, the odometer had 60K miles and still on the original tires (with a ton of tread left) and original brakes when I traded it in. The 1-2-3 levels of regenerative 'braking' is simply increasing how aggressively the electric motor 'brakes'. I usually drive with one-press of the left paddle when driving on highways. When/if I need to brake more quickly, I up it to level 3. The down-side of regenerative braking on the Niro - and this is a biggie - is that using it to slow you down DOES NOT illuminate the car's brake lights. If someone is following you closely, that could be disastrous. A simple brake-pedal 'tap' is usually sufficient.
 

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The down-side of regenerative braking on the Niro - and this is a biggie - is that using it to slow you down DOES NOT illuminate the car's brake lights. If someone is following you closely, that could be disastrous. A simple brake-pedal 'tap' is usually sufficient.
Not true for my PHEV. In position 3 the brake lights light up.
 

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The down-side of regenerative braking on the Niro - and this is a biggie - is that using it to slow you down DOES NOT illuminate the car's brake lights. If someone is following you closely, that could be disastrous. A simple brake-pedal 'tap' is usually sufficient.
Yeah, that's not accurate. My brake lights absolutely come on with regen only braking. I can see it when it's dark out in my mirror, because the dealer installed one of those center brake light pulse units, so it's pretty visible. I actually wish they wouldn't come on with light regen. It's good they come on with "normal" braking, but when regen is simply holding my speed on a downhill stretch, there's no need for the brake lights, as I'm not slowing.
 

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when regen is simply holding my speed on a downhill stretch, there's no need for the brake lights, as I'm not slowing.
Guessing that brake lights won't come on with cruise control in the same situation. The Niro has no idea why you are braking (apparently slowing) if you use the manual pedal thus the brake light is important. In ordinary cars, it is routine to see brake lights anyway in cars just trying to maintain legal speed going down a hill.

Mind you, I don't even know if my paddle-less Niro activates brake lights with strong regen going down a steep hill on cruise control.
 

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Nope, that downstream scenario I mentioned is with Adaptive Cruise on. So it is turning the brake lights on under the CC.
 

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Think of it as similar to downshifting when driving a manual transmission. 'Braking' with the regenerative paddle shifters, is using the electric motor to slow the car down, not, as I understand it, the car's brakes. Indeed, on my previous Niro, a 2017 hybrid, the odometer had 60K miles and still on the original tires (with a ton of tread left) and original brakes when I traded it in. The 1-2-3 levels of regenerative 'braking' is simply increasing how aggressively the electric motor 'brakes'. I usually drive with one-press of the left paddle when driving on highways. When/if I need to brake more quickly, I up it to level 3. The down-side of regenerative braking on the Niro - and this is a biggie - is that using it to slow you down DOES NOT illuminate the car's brake lights. If someone is following you closely, that could be disastrous. A simple brake-pedal 'tap' is usually sufficient.
the brake lights of my HEV 2020 go on only when paddle regen level is 3.
 
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