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Hi, I just purchased 2020 Niro phev, and whenever the internal combustion engine turns on, it idles at around 1200-1300 rpm. It seems high for an idle speed. Anyone can tell me what the normal idle speed should be for this car? I’m used to all my vehicles idling at 600-700 rpm.
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Hi, I just purchased 2020 Niro phev, and whenever the internal combustion engine turns on, it idles at around 1200-1300 rpm. It seems high for an idle speed. Anyone can tell me what the normal idle speed should be for this car? I’m used to all my vehicles idling at 600-700 rpm.
thank you
Can't say I've ever paid attention to the idle. Maybe it's high since it's running the high voltage generator to charge the traction battery?
 

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Hi, I just purchased 2020 Niro phev, and whenever the internal combustion engine turns on, it idles at around 1200-1300 rpm. It seems high for an idle speed. Anyone can tell me what the normal idle speed should be for this car? I’m used to all my vehicles idling at 600-700 rpm.
thank you
I do not have a tach on my Niro and I don't think the idle has to be any set number. Would not surprise me at all if it runs 1200 - 1300 rpm. I doubt there is an actual spec for idle speed and I would not worry about it.
 

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When it's cold it will idle at 1500 to heat up faster, when it's warm it go down to 1300 but only come on as needed. In the summer we can drive our PHEV without the gas motor ever coming on unless we drive over 30 miles and use up the EV battery range.

It only runs the gas motor while stopped to make heat in the winter, to warm up the engine before switching from EV to Hybrid mode or of the hybrid battery is really low and runs to charge the battery for a few minutes for the lights or AC. So there isn't a need for it to idle at 600rpm, that's likely to slow to make enough power to charge the hybrid system or would take too long to warm up for the heater.
 

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Remember, the ICE is not a normal gasoline engine. Its an Atkinson Cycle engine with entirely different parameters than you might be "used to". That 1500 RPM might just be the correct speed to do the work required with this type of engine.
 

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In the PHEV, when the ICE starts it's often because of a call for cabin heat. In that case, running at fast idle will warm the engine a bit quicker and won't have to run as long. When mine ran only for heat, I would see close to 150 MPG, so it's really sipping fuel for that purpose.
 

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Another point to keep in mind - when the engine first starts it runs at high rpm until it warms up and then it will gradually go to a slower rpm as it fully warms up. Even though the car may have been running for a while when the ICE starts it is initially starting from a cold engine starting point and must warm up.

Kia has done a lot to help with warming the engine up quickly such as exhaust gas recirculation system.
 

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The engine does not idle in the normal sense that it is running and waiting for a command. If the car is idle and all systems are satisfied the engine is turned off. Therefore the engine always has an assignment if running whether it's cabin heat, adding charge to the traction battery, or getting prepared to take over for low battery or to ensure warm up prior to take off. Nothing to worry about. All is normal. When the engine completes its assignment it turns off. I have never seen my engine idle slow or not be on for a specific reason.
 

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On my HEV, idle only occurs on a cold startup (doesn't happen in midsummer heat), or at a stop if heat is called for. It also may happen if the traction battery is unacceptably low. I have never noticed that happening while the car is stopped but it is certainly possible.

While certainly idle at any rpm is something to avoid, it is never a complete loss and has a purpose. In the HEV, it warms the engine when starting so thermal efficiency is better when inevitably the engine is turned on for motive power (the PHEV usually can not be explained so simply and has more modes of operation than the HEV). It maintains a heating call at stops (and AC if the battery is low). I find idle at stop lights annoying for the implied inefficiency so I hit the off button for HVAC and that turns the engine off. I turn HVAC back on after stops as it should be more efficient if the engine is on for motive power.

In cold temperatures, my HEV starts off in EV mode but with the engine idling to bring it up to temperature. I generally accelerate faster as I believe (the truth is probably complicated) that efficiency is better when the engine is moving the car and not just idling. In addition, there is an upshift that occurs at 38 to 40 mph with a big jump in mpg according to the instant mpg display - so I try to reach that quickly.

These driver interventions probably increase efficiency (seems obvious that reducing idle time increases efficiency but may not beat the car's algorithms) but for only a fraction of total driving time. So more of theoretical gain than could ever be measured by an owner. Still, generally hybrid owners do change their driving behavior and this is one efficiency game I'm willing to play.

So yes, I know the thread starter owns a PHEV and I've been mostly talking about the hybrid. However when you operate the PHEV as a hybrid like on long trips, it is very relevant. More simply you can recognize that while the engine is on, whether idling or driving the wheels, it is also charging the battery. So not a dead loss as it would be in an ICE only car.
 

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If I recall correctly, my 2012 Volt would run the engine at ~1300 rpm when sitting at a stop light, even with the motor warmed up. I dont know exactly how the Niro uses its combustion engine/battery setup, but in the Volt, the car was designed as an electric car with a gas generator, meaning the engine itself never* powered the wheels. That was the responsibility of the traction motor, which was powered by the battery. The elevated idle speed was to help keep the battery from falling too low in its charge and cause a "low propulsion" problem.

* Actually, the ICE motor could work in conjunction with the battery/traction motor only in a very specific case for which I don't think many people ever ran in to. The ICE motor was never designed to power the wheels on its own in the Volt.
 

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Hi, I just purchased 2020 Niro phev, and whenever the internal combustion engine turns on, it idles at around 1200-1300 rpm. It seems high for an idle speed. Anyone can tell me what the normal idle speed should be for this car? I’m used to all my vehicles idling at 600-700 rpm.
thank you
My 2018 PHEV idles fast when starts cold. Typical fast idle on cold startup for an ICE. should idle down as soon as warms up.
 

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I have a 2020 Niro phev also and definitely think it idles at a fast rate. It can merrily drive itself at 5 mph without my foot anywhere near touching the gas pedal.
Chances are good that the engine is not engaged in the drivetrain. That is also the merry speed in EV mode with foot off the pedal. Take a look at your dash to see what mode you are in. Generally, at speeds below 6 mph it is only the traction battery driving the car. I can only get the engine to engage with a good push on the accelerator pedal at low speeds.
 
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