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Hi,

I have a 2018 Kia Niro PHEV EX.

Wondering what is the best approach to install a 240v charger in the garage for plug in? Just call an electrician and install a 240v socket? Or is it more than that? Googling showed up a CharePoint electric home charger which is super expensive.

Please advise.

Thanks,
r-a-v-i
 

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Hi,

I have a 2018 Kia Niro PHEV EX.

Wondering what is the best approach to install a 240v charger in the garage for plug in? Just call an electrician and install a 240v socket? Or is it more than that? Googling showed up a CharePoint electric home charger which is super expensive.

Please advise.

Thanks,
r-a-v-i
Yeah, the ChargePoints are nice but very pricey. Fortunately, since the Niro can't take advantage of the higher charging current it provides you can just use one of these:

https://www.amazon.com/Duosida-Portable-Electric-Vehicle-Charger/dp/B018A6QK7C?crid=KUK20QQWUIPC&keywords=level+2+ev+charger&qid=1540732250&sprefix=level+2+,aps,209&sr=8-9&ref=sr_1_9

You can have an electrician install a 240V outlet in the garage and you are good to go. I plan to pick one up soon myself. I've been very happy with the 120V charger, but could use the faster charging on the weekend when we take several short trips.
 

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Depending on how handy you are, and where your panel is in your house, you can run your own wire and plug then get it inspected by your electrical athority. A 20amp line isn't all that hard and the only difference between 120 and 240v is that you have a black and red wire, rather than a black and white. The two legs on the 240v are hot, where 120v you have a hot and an neutral.
 

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Depending on how handy you are, and where your panel is in your house, you can run your own wire and plug then get it inspected by your electrical athority. A 20amp line isn't all that hard and the only difference between 120 and 240v is that you have a black and red wire, rather than a black and white. The two legs on the 240v are hot, where 120v you have a hot and an neutral.
I'll add: a 20a circuit requires 12g wire, not 14g which is used for 15a circuits.
 

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You can have an electrician install a 240V outlet in the garage and you are good to go. I plan to pick one up soon myself. I've been very happy with the 120V charger, but could use the faster charging on the weekend when we take several short trips.
Just a bit of advice from a former PHEV owner (2013 Cmax Energi) - recharging several times a day for short trips will hasten the degradation of your battery. Charging heats it up, so does discharging it driving on the road. If you start charging while it's still hot from driving (like right after you come home), then it will get even hotter. It's load of fun to drive all EV, but this isn't a LEAF or Tesla, and is not a liquid cooled HEV. Makes no difference now, but in a few years you'll notice you won't be getting 26 EV miles on a charge as the LiOn loses battery capacity. Read the fine print in your owners manual - don't charge while hot, and battery capacity loss over time is normal. My Energi dropped in 5 years from 26 miles EV to 15 miles EV, as driving capacity dropped from 5.2 kWh to 3.6. Mind you, it will always be able to run as a hybrid, but we did buy the PHEV battery. Like Ford, I don't expect Kia will establish a minimum PHEV capacity as a warranty replacement.
 

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Move to Canada. From now until April, we don't seem to have any problem with getting cars cold, in a pretty quick manner. Sadly it's a bit of a bitch with the fuel economy though.
 

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While it is true heat is not advantageous to either battery charging or discharging it is unlikely that KIA engineers didn't take this into account. Temperature sensing will protect the battery and the car with heavy discharge and possible battery temperature gain on a steep uphill climb and immediately will still rapidly charge the battery on the downhill. The garage charge cycle even if immediately done after use of the car is minor to the probably already solved uphill downhill cycles and battery temperature issues. The only component that is exclusive to garage charging is the in car converter. The on the garage wall current provider ( aka charger) communicates using PWM ( Pulse Width Modulation) via a pilot wire to the in car converter ( AC to DC). The car will discontinue charging and communicate this the the garage wall unit via a voltage drop on the pilot wire if conditions require it. The car will re-communicate when it needs continued charging.The pause is rare and is a result of temperature or even rarer pressure build up in the battery. The most common pilot signal is the full charge signal.
 

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So let it cool before charging or it’s fine to charge when you first get home?
I charge right when I get home IF I was not substantially using the battery during my drive home. Typically, by the time I get home I've already run down the battery all the way earlier in the day, and it likely isn't too hot anymore from just running in normal hybrid mode. But if I've been using EV mode substantially on my way home, I wait a couple hours.

No idea what the "right" way is... That's just what I do.
 

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We presently have two 2013 ford cmax Energi's and I installed a Siemens universal versicharge 30amp level 2 charger in my garage. First I ran a 40amp 240v outlet to the garage. I still have 20 EV miles in the summer, only 10 in the winter. I went 1500 miles on 7 gallons of gas last summer. I fast charge daily, usually multiple times. But I live in Minnesota. I am hoping the Niro EV becomes available near here eventually.
 

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Because of having the level 2 charger in my garage I drive mainly in EV mode all summer and average 50 mpge in the winter. My wife averages 56 mpge in the winter, 170 mpge in the summer. Mine reads 999.9 mpge in the summer.
 

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I paid an electrician to do it because he had to add a circuit to the breaker box. I didn't realize you could secure power to everything but the cable coming in from outside the house, so I'd have done it myself and saved a few bucks
 

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I'll add: a 20a circuit requires 12g wire, not 14g which is used for 15a circuits.
I'll second that, at least AWG 12. Since our cars cannot accept anything higher than 3.3 kW, that translates into a 16 amp draw at 220 VAC. 20 amp capacity is the minimum for not only safety, but for satisfying code requirements.

Also note that these lower powered chargers, or more correctly electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), since the charger itself is contained in the car, come with a variety of different plugs, so make sure you install the correct outlet. The EVSE linked above uses a NEMA 6-20p plug, which appears to be the most common. That's what the EVSE I ordered uses as well. But there are others, so you might wait to install a plug until you at least identify the equipment you're going to buy.

Finally, if you have the least doubt about your ability to work within a live, powered circuit breaker box, please don't! Pay an electrician to do the work and stay safe. Touch the wrong place in that box and you could receive a lethal shock. :eek:
 
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