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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at the BEV. (OK, waiting). The L2 charging comes in 2 levels. 7.2kw and 3.6. I have an unused line in the garage that was once used for the electric stove. The breaker says 60a. Would this be a 7.2, or 3.6? Is 7.2 available in homes? I'm thinking it is, because the dryer says 30a. But I'm guessing. Thanks
(we now have a Leaf that gets a nightly L1 charge. And after 3 years, still has all the capacity bars)
 

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I'm looking at the BEV. (OK, waiting). The L2 charging comes in 2 levels. 7.2kw and 3.6. I have an unused line in the garage that was once used for the electric stove. The breaker says 60a. Would this be a 7.2, or 3.6? Is 7.2 available in homes? I'm thinking it is, because the dryer says 30a. But I'm guessing. Thanks
(we now have a Leaf that gets a nightly L1 charge. And after 3 years, still has all the capacity bars)
you would only want to connect a 50A max charger on that circuit for safety reasons, which would result in a 12kW max charging solution (50*240=12000W). it is my understanding, however, that the niro's onboard charging circuit limits level 2 charge to 40A, meaning the most you will be able to draw is still 7.2kW (30A). i have not looked into how much a level 3 charger would cost, but i assume a 240v 50A circuit would not suffice.
 

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You should be fine. Make sure there is nothing else on that circuit but I wouldn't expect that there is. Hopefully that really was your breaker saying 60 amps and not the breaker box saying that. Not much money to have an electrician check it out though.
 

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Be carefull, 60a is too risky. Even for a 50a. A normal L2 charger should be a 208-240 volt, 30a that plugs into a NEMA 6-50P or 50R wall plug. But like sphawk88 said, some chargers can go up too a max of 40a.


@sphawk88, a L3 is more a supercharger. it's a CC that provides a ~ 400v. Dont think you can have this on in the garage! ;)
Mine is ordered and will be installed in march.
 

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Be carefull, 60a is too risky. Even for a 50a. A normal L2 charger should be a 208-240 volt, 30a that plugs into a NEMA 6-50P or 50R wall plug. But like sphawk88 said, some chargers can go up too a max of 40a.


@sphawk88, a L3 is more a supercharger. it's a CC that provides a ~ 400v. Dont think you can have this on in the garage! ;)
Mine is ordered and will be installed in march.
correct, thinking back i was trying to remember what the L3 power was (50kW / 100kW) which is correct that most require a 450V service line (@~140A+ service). you could have this in your garage, however i doubt it would be a very cost effective solution.
 

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correct, thinking back i was trying to remember what the L3 power was (50kW / 100kW) which is correct that most require a 450V service line (@~140A+ service). you could have this in your garage, however i doubt it would be a very cost effective solution.
Here is our CC L3 superstations that is provided from our Hydro-Quebec. pretty impressive machines. For 10$ Canadian an hour.. You could charge up to 80% of a EV Niro in ~ 1 hour instead of 9 hours with a L2 charger at home.


Our L2 public 240v chargers cost either 1$ an hour (if a vehicle is connected to a station for three hours, charging will cost $3.00, even if the vehicle was completely charged after one hour.) or 2.50$ flat fee regardless of the lengh of charge.
 

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Here is our CC L3 superstations that is provided from our Hydro-Quebec. pretty impressive machines. 10$ can an hour.. You could charge too a top of 80% of a EV Niro un ~ 1 hour instead of 9 hours with a L2 charger at home.
lol yes, but likely the cost to have your home power service upgraded to that level will greatly exceed the benefits of fast charging at home (typically you will stay overnight at home; ~5hours of charging will suffice on average). it will be interesting to see how EV technology progresses with respect to charging (regardless of battery improvements). there are a number of interesting patents out for passive charging on the road, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Aren't L3 chargers 3 phase? Not too many homes with that service.
And I'm confused with the chargers on Amazon. I've forgotten a lot about electricity. The prices are all over the place. $160 - 500. The charger is in the car. The cable you buy regulates the current, right? What does it do that the charger and the circuit breaker don't do? On the Leaf, the timer is in the car. I assume the Niro is the same?
I've been doing all this research, and my wife hasn't even looked at the cars, online. She loves her Leaf's looks. She'd be OK with the new one, but it looks like any other car. I'm not thrilled with the Niro's front end, but I'd get used to it - just like with the Leaf. But if she doesn't like it, I've wasted the week! I really don't like the grill filler. It looks like a blister. The front end is redesigned. Why would they leave the grill opening - and fill it in?
 

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Well,
There are two constraints.

One
is the home power supply in this case presumably fused at 60 A. Now 80% of 60 is 48 amps. This is the max draw from the home power. A level two home wall unit ( aka Charger) via PWM on the pilot wire informs the car of the maximum draw it can take from the home. In this example it should be set to 48A or lower.

Two
is the car converter ( also aka as charger) that takes the home AC power and converts it for the battery. These are rated in KW. The car will never draw more than the maximum capacity in Kw than this. A preceding post show how to convert this to an amperage draw rate.
If the home power is less than the in car converter max then the home draw is the max.
If the car converter is less than the home power then the car converter is the max.
 
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