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Hi everybody. Brand new 2018 Niro plug-in owner (as of three days ago).

I know that for laptops (for example, though maybe this isn't a thing with new technology?) the advice was to drain the battery entirely before charging, otherwise you artificially "teach" your battery to have a shorter life. Is that true for the battery in the plug ins? Should I drain all 25ish miles before plugging in again, or does it not matter?

Thanks!
 

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Hi everybody. Brand new 2018 Niro plug-in owner (as of three days ago).

I know that for laptops (for example, though maybe this isn't a thing with new technology?) the advice was to drain the battery entirely before charging, otherwise you artificially "teach" your battery to have a shorter life. Is that true for the battery in the plug ins? Should I drain all 25ish miles before plugging in again, or does it not matter?

Thanks!
In my past work/career experience involving re-chargable batteries, today's Lithium Ion variety can not be "taught" or often called "memory".......... the older NiCad (Nickel Cadmium) batteries DEFINITELY developed a "memory" and full dis-charging and re-charging was necessary to maintain not just good battery life but charge performance and longevity, the Niro battery is designed to never let itself fall below 20% charge and never go above 80% charge, even if your Niro battery icons indicate full bars/full charge etc..........it's 80%.............this is intentional to allow headroom for extra charging achieved from regenerative braking, coasting down long slopes/hills, etc..........

This 80/20 range is also supposedly the "sweet spot" that will allow the batteries to last 10-15 years or more, a huge plus. So no matter how much you try, you can NOT drain a Niro battery below 20%, the software wont allow it, the engine will kick on to recharge if you hit 20%.
 

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The absolute worst thing you can do to a Li-ion battery, is discharge it completely. As eddarrah said, modern EVs and hybrids won't allow that to happen.
You also don't want to do that with your phone or laptop anymore, as they all use Li-ion batteries now.
 

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The absolute worst thing you can do to a Li-ion battery, is discharge it completely. As eddarrah said, modern EVs and hybrids won't allow that to happen.
You also don't want to do that with your phone or laptop anymore, as they all use Li-ion batteries now.
I left a Lithium Ion battery pack sitting in a rarely used laptop, over a year without use, total drain, and it would NOT recharge, DEAD DEAD DEAD.....................had to replace it.
 

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I had a similar experience with an iPhone 5 I was gifting to a sister. I had left it uncharged for 18 months but the battery was only a few months old from Apple. Took it to a private battery replacer who put the old battery back in saying the new battery would not charge either. I cleaned the Lightning port as best I could suspecting corrosion and was able to charge the phone although I had to supply torque on the connector for that to happen. After a week of use by my sister, the port was clean and no longer required a special positioning hassle.
 
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