Kia Niro Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We have a new Niro EV. The Level 1 charger cable included with the car shows "Fault" when it is plugged into a standard 120 volt socket, and the cable will not supply any charge to the car. See the photo below. Any suggestions?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts
We have a new Niro EV. The Level 1 charger cable included with the car shows "Fault" when it is plugged into a standard 120 volt socket, and the cable will not supply any charge to the car. See the photo below. Any suggestions?
try changing the charge current frm 12a to 8a. there is a little square black button on the back of the l1 charging cable. un plug the cable from the car but leave it plugged into the wall. push the button for 2 seconds. it will cycle through H M and L. 12, 10 and 8a respectively.

on the phev one can also change the charge current from the PHEV charging menu on the center dash.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
884 Posts
It's also possible the AC outlet you are using isn't wired correctly, or has a broken or poorly connected wire (likely the ground wire). It might work fine with lower powered devices, but the EVSE is very particular about the power it is fed. I like Charles' suggestion as well to try using a lower power setting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,569 Posts
Agree. But try a different outlet to confirm your cord works. If it does, get an electrician to update your home circuit. You would probably want a faster charging speed with a BEV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Also try a different outlet in your home and if possible somewhere else (neighbor's home). If the cord works at neighbor's house, then you know it is your outlet causing the problem. If the cord doesn't work at neighbor's house, then you know the problem lies with the cord and you can take it back to a Kia dealer and have them swap it out. It is covered under the warranty.

Though like yticolev said, look into getting a L2 220V EVSE installed if possible. 2.5 hour charge times are wonderful!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
Also try a different outlet in your home and if possible somewhere else (neighbor's home). If the cord works at neighbor's house, then you know it is your outlet causing the problem. If the cord doesn't work at neighbor's house, then you know the problem lies with the cord and you can take it back to a Kia dealer and have them swap it out. It is covered under the warranty.

Though like yticolev said, look into getting a L2 220V EVSE installed if possible. 2.5 hour charge times are wonderful!
It'll take just a little longer than 2.5 hours to charge the EV Niro. That's how long it takes to charge the PHEV with it's 8.9kWh pack.

From this link: https://www.chargepoint.com/blog/everything-you-need-know-about-charging-kia-niro-ev-and-phev/


  • Level 1 Charging (120V) = 60 hours from empty
  • Level 2 Charging (240V) = Under 10 hours
  • DC Fast Charging (SAE Combo connector) = 80% in 54 minutes (100 kW charger)
60 hours at Level 1? :eek: I think maybe the included cable just chuckled weakly and died when connected to the car.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
884 Posts
It'll take just a little longer than 2.5 hours to charge the EV Niro. That's how long it takes to charge the PHEV with it's 8.9kWh pack.

From this link: https://www.chargepoint.com/blog/everything-you-need-know-about-charging-kia-niro-ev-and-phev/


  • Level 1 Charging (120V) = 60 hours from empty
  • Level 2 Charging (240V) = Under 10 hours
  • DC Fast Charging (SAE Combo connector) = 80% in 54 minutes (100 kW charger)
60 hours at Level 1? :eek: I think maybe the included cable just chuckled weakly and died when connected to the car.
True, but it's highly unlikely anyone will be charging a e-Niro with a battery that low. And since they are likely starting with at least a 20% charge, the L2 charger would easily top it off overnight, likely in about 6-7 hours. But I agree that no one with an BEV should depend on an L1 charger for normal charging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
The L1 charger is really only for the case where you arrive at your destination only to find all chargers are inoperable. You can get about 50 miles of charge over night and that might get you to a real charger. I haven't checked the Niro but the L1 charging was significantly lower efficiency than L2 on my C-Max.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I had the same problem in my old house. Had an electrician out anyway to put a 220V in the garage for a level 2 charger and at the same time had him rewire and ground the 110 outlet. Now it works (but of course I just use the level 2.)
I suspect as others have said, it's a wiring problem and most likely the outlet isn't grounded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
One other thing to consider for those having problems with their house wiring, VW's charger does not work unless the circuit is gfi protected. There's a symbol for that specific fault on the charger. Maybe Kia thinks that might confuse owners and would prefer they consult an electrician, so they just have it throw a generic 'don't work' fault.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
884 Posts
I believe it is code for all outlets in a garage to be gfi compliant, but not sure when that was added.
Nah, I went through the national electrical code before I installed the 220/50 amp circuit for my daughter's car. There's requirements about being so many inches above the garage floor, but nothing about a GFI on the circuit. I found they do make GFI breakers of that size, but they cost 10 times a normal 50 amp breaker. $105 instead of $10.

My home was built in 1990, and there's no GFI circuits in the garage. To my knowledge they're only required in kitchen and bathroom areas, or outdoor outlets that may get wet. My hot tub (the original use of my 50 amp circuit) didn't have one either, but it had no outdoor connections. Although there is some discussion online about the code being updated as of Jan this year to require it on high powered garage outlets, so my install might not meet the new code. But things like that aren't retroactive, so we're good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
try changing the charge current frm 12a to 8a. there is a little square black button on the back of the l1 charging cable. un plug the cable from the car but leave it plugged into the wall. push the button for 2 seconds. it will cycle through H M and L. 12, 10 and 8a respectively.

on the phev one can also change the charge current from the PHEV charging menu on the center dash.
Hi just got a 2019 kia niro. Seeing the fault indicator after plugging into a wall outlet. It's showing 12A and I tried pushing the black button on the back for over 10 secs but it doesn't change to 10 or 8 amps. I also tried switching the settings in the center dash to 'low' but still getting a red light at the charging cable and in the car.

Is there a trick to changing the amp settings on the charging cable? Thanks!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hi just got a 2019 kia niro. Seeing the fault indicator after plugging into a wall outlet. It's showing 12A and I tried pushing the black button on the back for over 10 secs but it doesn't change to 10 or 8 amps. I also tried switching the settings in the center dash to 'low' but still getting a red light at the charging cable and in the car.

Is there a trick to changing the amp settings on the charging cable? Thanks!!!
Ok figured it out - i tried a different outlet where 12A doesn't give an error and then I was able to switch to different amp settings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
adding on my experience as ths was the only thread discussing similar issues.
  • my level 1 charger 'kia phev 2018] stopped working 3 days back.
  • initially it didn't show any fault....just wouldn't charge.
  • in a day the dreaded fault started showing p followed by the charger being completely dead
my kia dealership just ordered an new one under warranty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
When I got my 2011 Nissan Leaf it came with a 120 volt EVSE and was slow to charge. There was a guy on the LEAF forum that would modify the standard EVSE to accept 220 Volt power and cut the charge time to a bit less than half of the 120V. The standard Nissan EVSE was in fact made by Panasonic with a Nissan logo plastered on it. I have a Niro EV on order and so have not yet seen the EVSE that comes with it but it is quite possible that it can also be re-worked to pass 220v to the cars charger. The plug on the EVSE has to be exchanged but you can get off the shelf adapters for the new 220V plug on the EVSE to 110V so you can still plug in anywhere. The cats ass of the EVSE is to get a Quick220 and you can do faster chargers just about anywhere.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
884 Posts
When I got my 2011 Nissan Leaf it came with a 120 volt EVSE and was slow to charge. There was a guy on the LEAF forum that would modify the standard EVSE to accept 220 Volt power and cut the charge time to a bit less than half of the 120V. The standard Nissan EVSE was in fact made by Panasonic with a Nissan logo plastered on it. I have a Niro EV on order and so have not yet seen the EVSE that comes with it but it is quite possible that it can also be re-worked to pass 220v to the cars charger. The plug on the EVSE has to be exchanged but you can get off the shelf adapters for the new 220V plug on the EVSE to 110V so you can still plug in anywhere. The cats ass of the EVSE is to get a Quick220 and you can do faster chargers just about anywhere.
I believe it has been attempted, but personally I wouldn't do it. The cord on the 110v unit isn't sized for the full current that the Niro EV can accept from a L2 EVSE. It's designed for 12 amps, and the Niro EV is capable of charging at 32 amps. You would have to throttle down the 110v unit (the PHEV does have a button to reduce the current, I can't say if the EV version is different). So even if you could use the 110v unit on 220v, you still have a 12 amp power limit, so you wouldn't decrease the charge time that much with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
I believe it has been attempted, but personally I wouldn't do it. The cord on the 110v unit isn't sized for the full current that the Niro EV can accept from a L2 EVSE. It's designed for 12 amps, and the Niro EV is capable of charging at 32 amps. You would have to throttle down the 110v unit (the PHEV does have a button to reduce the current, I can't say if the EV version is different). So even if you could use the 110v unit on 220v, you still have a 12 amp power limit, so you wouldn't decrease the charge time that much with it.
Actually it would cut the charging time in half which for the EV would be significant. At level 1 the EV takes ~60 hours for a full charge. :eek:

Several PHEV owners here have made the same mod with no problems. The current at L2 is the same as for L1 so there's no increase there. The total power delivered is ~2x though, which is what matters for the battery. 12A @ 120v = 1400W while 12A @240V = 2900W. My guess is that the stock EVSE is the same unit worldwide and they just attached the appropriate line cord depending on the region.

I'm not interested in trying it myself, but that's only because I don't have a 240V outlet in my garage and I don't need the faster charging at home.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top