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I've been doing fine / satisfied with the level 1 charging, but given that my garage is already wired for this it seems like too good of a deal to pass up.
I was undecided as to whether to upgrade to a L2 charger, but did go ahead. One benefit is that if I run errands in the morning, I can do a quick charge and be fully charged for any subsequent trip(s) later that same day. Also, some power companies provide time of day pricing with the lowest rates late at night. L2 charging can take full advantage of that. These are the two of the potential benefits that L2 charging may offer.
 

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That's exactly how I use mine. With the L2 EVSE, I can top it off and have a full battery for multiple trips throughout the day.
 

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Seattle's rate structure is such that only large demand customers (not residential) get a variable rate: "Seattle has time‐of‐day rates for large and high demand general service customers." :confused:
 

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Sounds like you are referring to Seattle City Light. PSE has the majority of the remainder of King County. They don't have variable rates, but they do have two tiers, with the lower cost tier for the first 600 kW of power used, and everything higher is the second tier.

I'm in a test program that PSE gave me a JuiceBox Pro 40 and in return they monitor my use by time of day and charge demand. If I only charge during off-peak times, which they label as:
  • 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • 10 p.m. – 6 a.m.
  • Anytime on weekends
I get a $10 credit. I've received the credit once or twice since the Juicebox was installed in March. I think the times they're getting me within those times are the morning before 11 AM. The wife often runs to the store early and of course plugs back in when she gets home. Even though their credit would equal the majority of my cost to charge, it's more important for me to have enough charge to stay in EV mode as much as possible. I save more than that $10 credit in gas each month be staying in EV mode. And since the Juicebox can tell me exactly how much electricity I use each month, I know I've never paid more than about $17 in a month for it.
 

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For those considering an upgrade to L2 charging capability, I recommend either the NEMA 14-30 or NEMA 14-50 standard as opposed to the NEMA 10-30 as your wall receptacle. NEMA 10 is an older 3 wire standard whereas the NEMA 14 is a newer 4 wire standard (with added ground). I was tempted to go with the NEMA 10-30 simply because that's what my drier used and I thought I could test the charging cable by using the drier outlet prior to installation of wall receptacle. While the NEMA 10 may be grandfathered in, the NEMA 14 may be required for new installations depending, of course, on local codes.
 

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I agree that the 14-50 would be the most commonly used outlet. And virtually all EVSEs that support more than 16 amps will have a plug that supports it.
 

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Reasons for not using the 110v for me are, wall plugs are not meant for continuous full load, you should hard wire your cable, this is a real problem in garages where the corrosion of the socket and plug are a concern. I have an infrared accessory for my phone, useful esp. for ground fault outlets, creepy to see how hot some older outlets run.
Secondly I think long term you could shorten the battery life if you don't fully charge it due to unplugging to use as it takes 8 hours. I really doubt the engineers at KIA had an interest in optimizing for that.
 

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"you should hard wire your cable"

Excellent advice for a Level 2 charger in a garage. A garage by its nature is going to see some water. There are times when many individuals will actually use a hose in a garage. An open 220v/240v outlet if the charger is unplugged or removed and a water hose in a garage is a recipe for disaster, especially if there are young children in the household!
 

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Reasons for not using the 110v for me are, wall plugs are not meant for continuous full load, you should hard wire your cable, this is a real problem in garages where the corrosion of the socket and plug are a concern. I have an infrared accessory for my phone, useful esp. for ground fault outlets, creepy to see how hot some older outlets run.
Secondly I think long term you could shorten the battery life if you don't fully charge it due to unplugging to use as it takes 8 hours. I really doubt the engineers at KIA had an interest in optimizing for that.
I don't think it's as bad as that. The 120v EVSE maxes out at 12 amps, and even in older homes it's a 15 amp circuit, with newer homes now with 20 amp circuits. And those circuits are rated for constant use. The question becomes if there are other devices on the same circuit, then the potential to overload the circuit certainly increases.

Now, is the battery optimized for 120v charging? Only Kia engineers can answer that. Since they call the 120v EVSE as an emergency/occasional use device, it's certainly possible that the battery will last longer using 240v.
 

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"you should hard wire your cable"

Excellent advice for a Level 2 charger in a garage. A garage by its nature is going to see some water. There are times when many individuals will actually use a hose in a garage. An open 220v/240v outlet if the charger is unplugged or removed and a water hose in a garage is a recipe for disaster, especially if there are young children in the household!
There's no valid reason to require the EVSE to be hard wired. He might have been referring to a dedicated circuit for the EVSE, which isn't a bad idea. But the electrical code requires the outlet for an EV charging station to be a certain distance above the floor. Even hosing out a garage you generally aren't getting the walls wet, and even with splashing it's unlikely to get more than a couple of feet up. My EVSE is hard wired, but that's because the one my utility company gave me can't communicate back to them through a GFI breaker, which is required for circuits above a certain amp rating. When I installed the outlet for my daughter's EVSE, I placed the outlet about 6 feet above the floor. That was simply a convenient place to put it since the EVSE itself has such a short power cord. Only about 18".
 

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Article on requirements for GFI requirements for all Garage outlets.

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The garage is a dangerous environment and demands safety and precautions when installing circuits. A little kid who pick up a hose to play in the garage while dad takes a break from cleaning the floor doesn't know where outlets are located. Safe practices and experience demand that an outlet be protected or hardwired to prevent a tragic accident . An open 240 volt unprotected outlet in the garage is not best practice. The fact that a charger can be unplugged means there is the potential for and unprotected 240 volt outlet in an area that will have water in it.

If a person realizes that and doesn't choose to hardwire knowing the potential consequences, that is one thing. If an individual doesn't quite imagine the potential risk and tragedy that could result from an unprotected outlet that is quite another thing. The information in my post is meant for the individual that doesn't realize the risk and would appreciate eliminating the risk .

I would think most would appreciated the electrical safety reminder and effort to make them aware of potential tragic situations. This input is for people who want to do things as safe as possibly not to start an argument.

Hopefully it will give a person the information to make a good decision based on an abundance of safety.

Updated for additional alternative- If an individual wanted to protect a 240 volt circuit in a damp location there are GFI Circuit Breakers available such as the one listed below to protect against shock- this is another safe alternative to hardwiring

 

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I don't disagree with anything you say here. But if someone is installing an outlet for an EVSE the odds are there will always be something plugged into it. So an uncovered 240v outlet is unlikely. Before I had my Juicebox installed hard wired, I had a 240v outlet connected to the same breaker and my 16a EVSE was always plugged into it.
 
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