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I just picked up this 16a L2 charger https://www.primecom.tech ..in 30ft length 6-50 plug and it works great! Chord is long enough to charge in garage or run under garage door and charge in driveway. 2.5 hours to s full charge from a completely depleted battery, now I can do multiple trips a day and be fully charged for each one.
Hello Javiera781,
I got the same type of lvl2 charger, and I have the exacts same conclusion ;)
 

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It looks like your cord protector doubles as a touch feeler for stopping your car in your preferred spot in the garage? Maybe not as you have a lot of space. My garage is considerably more cramped and the Niro is longer than prior car so I rigged a suspended tennis ball from ceiling for my indicator. Stop when windshield touches it.
It's a 3 car garage and the 240 outlet is right on the other side of the power box in the 1 car side of the garage ...I actually installed the black "stop" you see in this pic before I got the lvl2 charger -- but it just so happens that because of the location of the outlet the chord ramp also acts as a stop :)
 

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My level 2 charger experience.
1. Don' buy "more" charge amps ( 16) than your Niro PHEV can use. ( When i the car THEN i upgrade the charger. )
2. Research chargers that meet the 16 amp threshold.
3. What did I buy and why?

AmazingE Level 2, 240 Volt EV Charging Station by CLIPPER CREEK ( Amazon Prime $257.00 free shipping )

Notes: ONLY one I could find with UL certification. Company located in California for Q & A , not a mystery 800 #
Tested with inferred temperature meter. Surface temperature 104 degrees average in a 85 degree garage.
Quality flexible almost kink free 16' supply cable with excellent fitting PHEV plug.
Always keeps up with the NIRO charge time.
5 months use. Smile every time I plug in.
 

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maybe this will help some of the confusion

1) the stuff you buy from Amazon or Clipper Creek is NOT a charger ( unless you buy a DC charger and your car can take the fast charge)
these are all EVSE units (Electric Vehicle Service Equipment)

2) the little box contains almost nothing more than a relay.

3) the end of the cord that plugs into the car has no power on it (AC or DC ) until it is plugged into the car. It is totally dead for safety.

4) the car must have a good 12 volt battery on board under the hood

5) when the timer in the car says it is time to start charging, it send a 12 volt signal to the EVSE. Sort of seems backward to send power to the EVSE but it is only 12 volts.

6) the relay in the EVSE is activated by the 12 volt and 120 or 220 volt power is fed to the car.

7) the charger built into the car regulates how much current to put into the battery and monitors the charging

8) when the desired charging limit ( 80% or 100% ) is met, the 12 volt signal to the EVSE is cut off and the relay opens and the power cord no longer has power between the car and the EVSE.

9) charge timers IN THE CAR are all you need. they will signal the EVSE when you want to start and stop.

PS this may not be a perfect but it is the way I understand the system. I have been driving a Leaf since 2011. I got the original Nissan EVSE modified so it worked on either 120v or 220 with and totally automatic switch over. I have one at work and one at home and they have worked perfectly. Because the modified EVSE could work on 120 or 240 I also got a device called a "Quick220" Carry that around with an extra extension cord when you are away and you can often find a pair of plugs available on opposite 120V phases and use to plugs to input 220V to the EVSE.
The EVSE labelled Nissan is a Panasonic under the skin.
 

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maybe this will help some of the confusion

1) the stuff you buy from Amazon or Clipper Creek is NOT a charger ( unless you buy a DC charger and your car can take the fast charge)
these are all EVSE units (Electric Vehicle Service Equipment)

2) the little box contains almost nothing more than a relay.

3) the end of the cord that plugs into the car has no power on it (AC or DC ) until it is plugged into the car. It is totally dead for safety.

4) the car must have a good 12 volt battery on board under the hood

5) when the timer in the car says it is time to start charging, it send a 12 volt signal to the EVSE

6) the relay in the EVSE is activated by the 12 volt signal and 120 or 220 volt power is fed to the car.

7) the charger built into the car regulates how much current to put into the battery and monitors the charging

8) when the desired charging limit ( 80% or 100% ) is met, the 12 volt signal to the EVSE is cut off and the relay opens and the power cord no longer has power between the car and the EVSE.

9) charge timers IN THE CAR are all you need. they will signal the EVSE when you want to start and stop.

PS this may not be perfect but it is the way I most understand the system. I have been driving a Leaf since 2011. I got the original Nissan EVSE modified so it worked on either 120v or 220 with and totally automatic switch over. I have one at work and one at home and they have worked perfectly. Because the modified EVSE could work on 120 or 240 I also got a device called a "Quick220" Carry that around when your away and you can often find a pair of plugs available on opposite 120V phases and use to plugs to input 220V to the EVSE.
The EVSE labelled Nissan is a Panasonic under the skin.
No idea what you just said :p ..All I know is I had a 220 v / 50 amp plug installed (in case I end up going full EV and need > 16 amps) and purchased this:

https://www.primecom.tech/ (16 Amp version)

And now my PHEV charges in 2.5 hours versus 9 hours with the factory supplied 110 charger.
 

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No idea what you just said :p ..All I know is I had a 220 v / 50 amp plug installed (in case I end up going full EV and need > 16 amps) and purchased this:

https://www.primecom.tech/ (16 Amp version)

And now my PHEV charges in 2.5 hours versus 9 hours with the factory supplied 110 charger.
Not sure why your OEM charger was taking 9 hours. It's spec'd at about 5 1/2 hours for a full charge, and that's what mine did before I stepped up to an L2 EVSE.

My circuit is also 220/50, because I got rid of my 22 year old hot tub and had the circuit sitting there doing nothing. I pulled the wire out of the conduit (it fed into my back yard, so plenty of extra wire), used a length of conduit I had left over from the hot tub, and put the correct outlet on the end. The plug matches the EVSE I bought, so it's not a full 50 amp outlet. If I upgrade to an EV before I move from this house, I just need to pull one more wire through the conduit and change the outlet to the proper 50 amp version.

16 amps is all the Niro PHEV can use, so buying a larger, more expensive EVSE won't charge the car any faster. What you might get with a more expensive EVSE is WiFi connectivity, so you can monitor your charge from a phone app. My daughter's Juicebox EVSE does that. They bought a 40 amp EVSE, even through their Pacifica can only accept 32 amps. But when I wired it up I used large enough wire that they can charge something at 40 amps if they ever get one.
 

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I would also add a UL certified unit will have much more inside it than a relay! There are a lot of electronics involved to insure a customers safety when using the unit.

Here is a short video that about 1/2 through shows some of the internals in a Clipper Creek unit.

Some units not certified may have only a relay involved but certainly not a UL Certified unit.
 

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I wanted to edit my post above but could not figure out how.


having finally got a pdf of the SX Touring manual from my dealer I see that it does have three current settings so you don't overload your household circuits.

The manual also says, I kid you not, that if you use the heater/air conditioner the range may change up to 500 miles.

WOW ... and could I sell you some prime real estate 100 miles west of Miami !!!!
 

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The manual also says, I kid you not, that if you use the heater/air conditioner the range may change up to 500 miles.
In someone's dreams! :laugh:

Yes, using the HVAC will impact your range. Hopefully most people are aware of this by now. On my PHEV, the gauge will drop by 2 miles on a charged battery. For an EV, I'd expect to see something proportionate to the size of the battery. So about 7x more, 14-15 miles? And for the EV, it will strongly depend on if it's cooling or heat being called for. Heat will make a much more drastic hit on range than A/C.

Now for me, real world is actually better than the EPA range figures. In the summer with the A/C on, I was seeing 30 EV miles regularly, with 34 my best. Now that it's gotten cold, and the ICE is running in heat only mode, it also sends a little power back to the battery, so again I'm seeing more than the EPA range of 24 miles with HVAC running.
 

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I bought my level 2 charger for $400 Canadian from Primecom, about $300 USD. It has a 40' cable, going with a 30' cable would have dropped the price to $300 CDN, or $225 USD. It plugs into a 240V outlet I have in the garage. There are lots of options out there, lots cheaper than the one I bought.

I don't see any reason to get the more expensive chargers. Yes they can start and stop charging at specific times, but you can program the car to do that too. The only real benefit I see, is knowing you total energy usage from using the charger.

My level 2 charger is 16 amps and provides 3.3Kw of electricity to the car. I was originally going to get a 32 amp (240V) unit, but decided against it as the car can't use the extra power and I needed the longer cord for parking my car outside.
 

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I bought my level 2 charger for $400 Canadian from Primecom, about $300 USD. It has a 40' cable, going with a 30' cable would have dropped the price to $300 CDN, or $225 USD. It plugs into a 240V outlet I have in the garage. There are lots of options out there, lots cheaper than the one I bought.

I don't see any reason to get the more expensive chargers. Yes they can start and stop charging at specific times, but you can program the car to do that too. The only real benefit I see, is knowing you total energy usage from using the charger.

My level 2 charger is 16 amps and provides 3.3Kw of electricity to the car. I was originally going to get a 32 amp (240V) unit, but decided against it as the car can't use the extra power and I needed the longer cord for parking my car outside.
Wow, that's a long cord. Most EVSEs have a cord length of 20-25' at most. And I agree that a 16 amp EVSE is enough for the Niro PHEV. But if I had an EV, I would want the 32 amp EVSE to match the level of charger that the car has. Very few PHEVs have chargers larger than 3.3 kW. My daughter's Pacifica is one exception, and there's a couple of others. When I've used her Juicebox to charge mine, I noticed that yes it tells you the amount of power sent to the battery, but it has no feedback to tell me the current state of charge or time remaining. But since Kia has improved the Access app so much, I don't mind using it now. So I don't see much need for such an expensive EVSE.
 

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@atc98092 I've only had my Niro for 3 months, so I guess I missed out on an immature app. :)

I already had a 50 amp 240 outlet in my garage, but unfortunately it's closer to the front of the garage. So I needed the longer cord to charge the car outside. If I get a pure EV, I'll install another outlet closer to the car door and buy a higher output "charger". Most likely 25' long.
 

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There's my set-up and ready for winter!

EVduty-40 Smart-Pro version
  • Plug: NEMA 14-50P
  • 208-240VAC / 30 amps / 7,2 kW
  • For indoor or outdoor installation (-40 ° C to 40 ° C)
  • Output cable: 30 feet
  • Online management app
5832
 
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