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2020 Niro EV SX Touring
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Model: 2020/21 Niro EV
Battery: Lithium-ion polymer
Energy: 64 kWh

From my quick research, recommended battery care is to maintain a 20 - 80% charge when possible. In particular, don't regularly charge over 80% if you don't have to.

What about charge frequency? Is there a charge/discharge memory effect on the battery?
 

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2021 Kia Eniro 64 Kw trim evolution +11kw obc+ Heat pump.
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Model: 2020/21 Niro EV
Battery: Lithium-ion polymer
Energy: 64 kWh

From my quick research, recommended battery care is to maintain a 20 - 80% charge when possible. In particular, don't regularly charge over 80% if you don't have to. How about frequency? Is there charge/discharge memory effect on the battery?
Yes correct, But Kia and many user raccomand to charge it to 100% at least 1 time each month. So the car can be more accurate with range extimation. I charge my own with slow charging from 20% to 100%. With slow charge that would calibrate the batteries too (8Ah-12Ah).
 

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I concur with a 100% charge at least once monthly. It's been stated by a number of people with battery expertise. That's not me, by the way. :) With my PHEV I of course always charge to 100%, as there's no way to limit the charge in these cars. But they are designed for it, and they don't see the higher charge and discharge levels that you get with an EV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Someone correct me if this is dated info or does not a apply for some reason...

Battery University's tips for lithium-ion battery care:

Best way to charge:
  • Partial and random charge is fine
  • does not need full charge;
  • lower voltage limit preferred;
  • keep battery cool.
Discharge:
  • Prevent full cycles;
  • Apply some charge after a full discharge to keep the protection circuit alive.
How to prolong battery:
  • Keep cool.
  • Operate in mid SoC of 30–80%.
  • Prevent ultra-fast charging and high loads (most Li-ion)
Storage:
  • Store at 40% charge in cool place.

Source: Battery University: How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries
 

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I would say that all those tips are accurate, but add the occasional full charge to 100%. As noted, numerous battery experts say at least once monthly.
 
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Those tips are for a LiPo battery sitting in space. Your cars computer does all of that for you. Also, you cant charge to 100% because your cars computer will always leave some space available for your regenerative brakes to do their job. At least thats how the majority of hybrid and electric vehicles are made to operate...maybe Kia is different?
 

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Those tips are for a LiPo battery sitting in space. Your cars computer does all of that for you. Also, you cant charge to 100% because your cars computer will always leave some space available for your regenerative brakes to do their job. At least that's how the majority of hybrid and electric vehicles are made to operate...maybe Kia is different?
At least with the PHEV, if the battery is fully charged, it can run out of space for regen. I live up a pretty good hill. Once I climb the short grade of my driveway, I don't have to touch the accelerator until I pull away from the stop sign at the bottom. It's roughly 1/2 mile to the bottom of the hill. If I use the brakes to hold the 30 MPH speed limit, the ICE will fire up about 2/3 the way down to provide engine compression for slowing. If I use a side street to move over before continuing down, I use just enough energy from the battery that it can regen the rest of the way down. But even then the battery meter in the dash never goes over 99% from regen. The only time it reads 100% is off the charger.

That said, I think Kia still has a buffer at the top end. But I believe they hold it specifically for countering battery degradation, and won't let it exceed the limit during driving conditions. Just a guess on my part.
 

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This is generic or 'wikipedia' knowledge. Cars have battery management systems that control destructive heat and limit problems unlike cheap portable devices.
Read up in actual battery life in real cars rather than rely on generic internet knowledge.

Why do I care?

When you start making unsupported recommendations that you need to keep your battery between 20-80 percent, you just discounted your vehicles range by 40 percent. My Niro no longer has a 239 mile range but a 143 mile range, and this is what opponents of EVs will use to discourage people from adopting them

I would avoid keeping your vehicle constantly at 100 percent[IOW if you have a 5 mile commute, don't plug into your level 2 every night] and yes constantly draining to below 20 percent is not best practice.
But do you need your battery to last 500k miles or do you need to be able to rely on your car?

Drive the dang car and charge to the manufacturers recommendations.

Worry less.
Give less fuel to the bobbleheads
 

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No one has answered your question! Memory effect is something that affects nicad rechargeable batteries. For devices with those, longevity is best achieved by fully charging and discharging every cycle. I have a 12 year old Phillips electric toothbrush still working by following this advice - mind you the battery capacity has dropped so I have to recharge every 2 weeks or so instead of the original 6 plus weeks. Learned this in a college work study program 40 years ago testing satellite batteries for the Aerospace Corp - a bit before before it was generally known. Used same technique with my 90's to 00's era Apple laptops to get great battery life (never had to replace one before I upgraded in a 4 to 8 year cycle).

Lithium based batteries are not subject to this memory effect. Your are perfectly correct in thinking best management is to keep it in a 20-80% charge range. If you do not need 100% range the next day, don't charge above 80%. The bottom end will be limited by the software, and you will go into limp mode before the battery is flat. However, this is not something you want to do often as it can be just as harmful as charging to 100%. Mind you, 100% on the dash is not 100% in the battery, there is a buffer hidden from you, probably somewhere between 5 and 10%. As a result, even careless battery charging will not reduce your range before a normal 10 year ownership period.

I try to do this with my current laptop, but there is no software to do this for you. So I never screw up the bottom, but I forget and leave the laptop unattended sometimes resulting in 100% charge (Apple and other brands may well have a top end buffer too).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Thanks for the excellent feedback.
My takeaways:

  • Memory effect does not apply.
  • Partial and random charge is fine.
  • Maintain 20-80% charge range most of the time.
  • Lower voltage (L1, L2) is preferred.
  • Charge to 100% monthly to recalibrate the range guestimator.
  • There are internal buffers which safeguard against battery degradation. So don't overfuss. You're battery will probably be fine.
 

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I believe your takeaways are correct. Although Kia itself doesn't recommend using the L1 EVSE that comes with the car on a regular basis. They consider Level 2 as the main charging level to use, and the L1 EVSE is for infrequent use, mostly when no other option is available. But your last bullet sums it all up nicely.
 
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I don't think there is any evidence that L2 is better for battery health. The warning from Kia is a legal one to protect themselves from owners starting house fires from faulty outlet wiring, not to mention extension cords. I have a Kona EV owner a couple blocks from me who only has L1. L2 is of course necessary for those with very long commutes, and generally such outlets are more likely to be properly wired by a licensed electrician.
 
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