Kia Niro Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all.
I'm thinking about buying a Niro hybrid in the near future. It will most likely be a non plug in.
My question is with my commute, which is roughly between 3 and 5 miles one way in town on flat roads doing roughly 45mph, how good can i expect as far as mpg is concerned?
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Depends where you live. Just a guestimate......50mpg summer 43 winter. I know you said your just considering the HEV but you sound like a good canadate for the PHEV
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,121 Posts
I would go that route but where I live there's not a place to plug one in.
True, finding a plug is difficult when you can't charge at home or at work. But do consider that the federal tax credit (if you can take it, or if you lease) can make up the majority of the price difference between the PHEV and the HEV. And when you are able to plug in your commute would easily be 100% EV powered.

You might ask at work about charging there. Many employers will either allow it for free, or for a monthly fee that would likely not be much. Under your scenario, I doubt you would use more than $20 of electricity per month from them. You would only burn gas if you needed cabin heat in colder weather. As an example, I the last two months since I filled my tank (didn't really need it but I topped it off anyway) I've driven about 1400 miles and used maybe two gallons of gas and about $30 of electricity. So that works out to under 3 cents per mile of cost to drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Hello all.
I'm thinking about buying a Niro hybrid in the near future. It will most likely be a non plug in.
My question is with my commute, which is roughly between 3 and 5 miles one way in town on flat roads doing roughly 45mph, how good can i expect as far as mpg is concerned?
Thanks
I'm guessing some of Texas is in your thoughts. We in AZ get just over 50 for about 8 months and just under in the heat runner A/C. Our '18 has been very reliable so far and is comfortable.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,121 Posts
If you can't charge at home, don't get the PHEV. A co-worker of mine bought a full electric and didn't have anywhere to charge it at home (condo). He sold it after a few months.
I would agree with a BEV, but not the PHEV. Since plugging in isn't absolutely isn't necessary to drive the car, you don't have to worry about running out of charge. And when the opportunity arises that you can plug in, you can make a significant dent in your fuel use. Now, if there's absolutely no potential ever to plug in, then yes the HEV is more cost effective, and you aren't hauling the weight of the battery around. But one might be surprised at the opportunities that can be found to charge. Sometimes even for free. And if (a big if) there are tax benefits for the PHEV, the cost difference between the two becomes pretty minor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I second the PHEV. I own one. I live in Western PA and chargers are few and far between. It comes with a 110v charger that can be plugged into a wall socket which is how I charge it most of the time. When you get home from work you can plug it in and get those 10 miles or so back on the battery in about two hours. During the shutdown when I was only driving to the grocery store every few days or so I charged the beast about twice a week and basically used no gas for 4 months. I started out in March with about half a tank and in July I had used less than an eighth of a tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Hello all.
I'm thinking about buying a Niro hybrid in the near future. It will most likely be a non plug in.
My question is with my commute, which is roughly between 3 and 5 miles one way in town on flat roads doing roughly 45mph, how good can i expect as far as mpg is concerned?
Thanks
I'm in a similar position and the Hybrid works fine for me.
I live in an apartment and my lease says I would be charged an extra $100/month to plug in the car and didn't have an option at work for charging.
By the way, I spent about $500 in gas for the first 10k miles (it took me 13 months).
With a 3-5 mile commute, I was averaging 45-55 mpg.
I recently started a new job and went to a 20 mile each way commute and am seeing almost 60 mpg for the last 2 weeks.
Just to show the contrast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I would agree with a BEV, but not the PHEV. Since plugging in isn't absolutely isn't necessary to drive the car, you don't have to worry about running out of charge. And when the opportunity arises that you can plug in, you can make a significant dent in your fuel use. Now, if there's absolutely no potential ever to plug in, then yes the HEV is more cost effective, and you aren't hauling the weight of the battery around. But one might be surprised at the opportunities that can be found to charge. Sometimes even for free. And if (a big if) there are tax benefits for the PHEV, the cost difference between the two becomes pretty minor.
Pulled in to a NISSAN dealership recently in Jacksonville FL. Parked next a LEAF and charged up the PHEV for free while my wife was shopping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Hello all.
I'm thinking about buying a Niro hybrid in the near future. It will most likely be a non plug in.
My question is with my commute, which is roughly between 3 and 5 miles one way in town on flat roads doing roughly 45mph, how good can i expect as far as mpg is concerned?
Thanks
Plug in at home. Level 2 chargers have come way down in price and even the level 1 chargers will get you back to 100% overnight with no trouble. Additionally, more and more local power companies offer special rates for electric car owners or evening power users.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
I would go that route but where I live there's not a place to plug one in.
I love my PHEV and FlNiro was correct that your commute is ideally suited to a PHEV, but if you can't plug-in, then it's not a good idea to purchase a PHEV.

One idea is to search for public charging stations in your area. If there's one that is within a couple of blocks from where you work or live, that might be an ideal solution. Especially because occasionally you can still find some municipal charging stations that are free. You might google for "ev charging stations central kentucky" and see what you find.

If that doesn't pan out, you're better off with the Hybrid. I'm thinking in a 3 mile commute, it might not have sufficient time to reach optimal ICE temperature that conveys optimal fuel efficiency and you might be disappointed that your daily commute doesn't turn in the MPG that EPA estimates, especially in winter, but it will probably still be a lot better than most of the non-hybrid alternatives.

I have in mind that Kentucky can be rather chilly in the winter. You would do well to get a trim package that has electrically heated seats: I think you will be glad you did. I enjoy that feature even during Southern California winters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I would go that route but where I live there's not a place to plug one in.
I own a 2019 regular Niro hybrid and appreciate not having to worry about plugging my car in. You will save a ton of money just with the hybrid as I do. I average in the mid 40's to near 50mpg and with gas prices in my area a fill up usually runs around 20 bucks. The fuel tank is only 11.9 gallons translating to a range of about 540 miles
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,842 Posts
I'm at 53 mpg over 36,000 miles, every drop counted. I would expect less if most of those miles were 3-5 mile short trips. Those trips I bicycle. Flat roads? Even easier. 100 kcalories each way. No gas or electricity used. Some CO2 output of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
I don't agree with the idea that short trips make the hev not worth it. Our touring gets twice the mpg around town as compared to our old focus. It burns more gas in colder weather but so did every other car that I've ever owned and I've owned plenty. I have nothing but good things to say about the mileage of this hybrid. Especially since I put on the sixteens on.
 

·
Registered
2019 Kia Niro LX
Joined
·
5 Posts
Hello all.
I'm thinking about buying a Niro hybrid in the near future. It will most likely be a non plug in.
My question is with my commute, which is roughly between 3 and 5 miles one way in town on flat roads doing roughly 45mph, how good can i expect as far as mpg is concerned?
Thanks
I drive for Uber & Lift and I'm getting 56-58 mpg constantly. I drive 200 plus miles a day 5 days a week.
 

·
Registered
2019 Kia Niro Hybrid LX
Joined
·
64 Posts
Hello all.
I'm thinking about buying a Niro hybrid in the near future. It will most likely be a non plug in.
My question is with my commute, which is roughly between 3 and 5 miles one way in town on flat roads doing roughly 45mph, how good can i expect as far as mpg is concerned?
Thanks
It depends on your driving habits, how well you maintain your car, and the weather. If you drive like the fast and the furious then you won’t get much but if you drive efficiently then you can get a pretty good number. I usually get 52-55mpg (560-600 miles on one tank). Also keep your tires properly inflated because that can cause poor mpg and do the oil changes. Some have also said that the winter weather can effect mpg but I haven’t been able to see a difference. I still get the same mpg no matter what weather.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top