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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,
I am new to this board and to the world of PHEVs. I have several questions but your experience in regard to the use of PHEVs would be greatly appreciated. I have researched this board but most of the things I have noted are old or about older cars. I am currently waiting on the 2023s come out. If anyone would be willing to tell me their opinions of the options, any quirks, how to best use the car (EV only until it runs out, etc.), how to best charge it, can it be charged at charging stations while on the road, how long does it take to charge it, just anything that you would have liked to have known before you bought yours to have been better equipped to use the car. And oh yeah would you buy it again if you had to.. I truly appreciate this.
 

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I found it best to use EV mode in the city and then switch to HEV mode or automatic on the highway. Since the capacity is small and fast charging still takes over 2 hours I've never charged it on the road, just one time we stayed at a hotel with free charging because it had time to take a full charge. But I do charge it at home and work. The included 110V charger will take about 7-8 hours if it's down near 20%, a 220V charger will do it under 2 1/2 hours, if your battery is still 50-60% it will only be half that time.
 

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I charge at home and at work, both on 110V, takes 5.5 h. Use HEV if going on long/highway trips to keep EV in reserve, such as on steep hills or when passing. Use EV on short trips. Recharge whenever it's convenient/available. Very simple. Oh, and be aware the 12v battery only lasts 3 years whereupon it dies and you need a jump start to get going again to replace it. That is a fact of the Niro PHEV. Oh, and you may consider getting a space saver spare tire kit so you're not left stranded upon getting a flat you can't fix with the inflator kit provided. I've experienced 3 sidewall punctures in 60,000 miles.
 

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2022 Niro PHEV EX Deep Cerulean Blue
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I have wanted to own a Niro since it was first released, but I had purchased a 2016 Soul and didn't want to eat the depreciation to buy a Niro. Really enjoyed the Soul and was impressed with the low maintenance costs and the reliability (this was the first Korean vehicle I had owned). After gas prices surged this year, I started looking at the Niro again. With the Federal rebate, the PHEV is about the same price as the HEV. Crazy used car market allowed me to sell the Soul for around $200 less than what I paid 5 years and 50,000 miles ago.

Am still playing around with the EV mode--try to use it if I am driving close to home--turns out 25 miles of pure electric isn't always enough for local jaunts. Clearly if I was still working the range wouldn't be enough to have a 100% electric commute (26 miles door to door). On the bright side of a smallish battery capacity, one can get by with just 110-120V AC outlet power (20A circuit) so I didn't have to run a 220 line into the garage.

EV mode becomes less important the longer your trip is—not worth spending 2-3 hours every 25 miles to recharge if you are on a 200-300 or longer voyage.

I put a deposit down for a Niro PHEV a week or so before the 2023 was unveiled at the NY auto show, so I was on the hook for a 2022. I like the increased range of the 2023s as well as some of the features. Am unsure if I like the bold styling of the 2nd gen Niros--really hard to tell from photos or videos--I need 3D real life renditioning. The 1st gen Niros are pretty esthetically subtle.

I would definitely buy another 2022 if need be, not sure about the 2023.
 

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Thanks guys. Would you buy another one?
I had a '19 PHEV, and have moved to a full EV. That said, I am seriously considering going back to a Niro PHEV when the 2023 comes out. They are finally addressing the few issues I had with mine: battery size is increasing (so more range), the EV motor is getting a power bump (so I could climb the many hills around my home without needing the ICE) and the '23 is supposed to have an electric heater (so the ICE isn't needed for cabin heat).

However, this brings up something to consider: Kia hasn't announced the model equipment levels for the US market yet. Everything we know so far is what's been announced for other markets. There's talk of a heads up display, but we have no idea if it (or the heater for instance) will be available in North America. That, along with no pricing info yet, makes it tough to really say if I'll do it. I don't care for the contrasting color on the rear fenders, but supposedly there's going to be a body color option for it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I charge at home and at work, both on 110V, takes 5.5 h. Use HEV if going on long/highway trips to keep EV in reserve, such as on steep hills or when passing. Use EV on short trips. Recharge whenever it's convenient/available. Very simple. Oh, and be aware the 12v battery only lasts 3 years whereupon it dies and you need a jump start to get going again to replace it. That is a fact of the Niro PHEV. Oh, and you may consider getting a space saver spare tire kit so you're not left stranded upon getting a flat you can't fix with the inflator kit provided. I've experienced 3 sidewall punctures in 60,000 miles.
I just noticed something else. My wife and I were at a restaurant the other day and while waiting for her to get out of the car, I noted a charging station close by. It said the rate was $3.50 and hour and I am going to assume that was a level 2 charger. On this site it has been noted that it takes the Niro PHEV about 2.5 hours to charge up completely with a level 2 charger. So if my PHEV got 30 miles on electric only, it was empty of charge, and if I tried to charge my Niro PHEV there while we ate for an hour, it would add about 12 miles range to the battery (roughly) for my $3.50. Am I correct about this or off base? I am still trying to get a handle on this charging thing. Thanks for any help anyone can provide.
 

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I just noticed something else. My wife and I were at a restaurant the other day and while waiting for her to get out of the car, I noted a charging station close by. It said the rate was $3.50 and hour and I am going to assume that was a level 2 charger. On this site it has been noted that it takes the Niro PHEV about 2.5 hours to charge up completely with a level 2 charger. So if my PHEV got 30 miles on electric only, it was empty of charge, and if I tried to charge my Niro PHEV there while we ate for an hour, it would add about 12 miles range to the battery (roughly) for my $3.50. Am I correct about this or off base? I am still trying to get a handle on this charging thing. Thanks for any help anyone can provide.
Sounds correct. It will probably charge you another $3.50 if you go over 1 hour.
 

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So if my PHEV got 30 miles on electric only, it was empty of charge, and if I tried to charge my Niro PHEV there while we ate for an hour, it would add about 12 miles range to the battery (roughly) for my $3.50.
The variable is what current level the charging station offers. Since the PHEV charges at 3.3 kW, it's likely the station will provide enough power to meet that number. But if it's a shared station (more than one connector that shares the power available), it's possible you won't get the full 3.3 kW, so your miles added could be a bit lower. I have seen some Chargepoint shared stations that are only rated at 6 kW, so when shared each car will only get 3 kW.
 

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Looking at this from a cost per mile standpoint. If $3.50 could get you 12 or so miles it would work out to be $0.29/mile plus an hour of your time. if one gets 40-45 mpg gas in HEV mode and if gas is $6.00/gallon the cost is around $0.13 to $0.15 per mile. Really doesn’t make economic sense to top up at $3.50 per hour until gas is more than $11.60/gallon assuming 40 mpg (gets worse if mpg is higher).
 

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Looking at this from a cost per mile standpoint. If $3.50 could get you 12 or so miles it would work out to be $0.29/mile plus an hour of your time. if one gets 40-45 mpg gas in HEV mode and if gas is $6.00/gallon the cost is around $0.13 to $0.15 per mile. Really doesn’t make economic sense to top up at $3.50 per hour until gas is more than $11.60/gallon assuming 40 mpg (gets worse if mpg is higher).
You are correct. This is a way for the charging station to make money.
It costs me a fraction of that to charge at home and it's definitely cost effective.
 

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Looking at this from a cost per mile standpoint. If $3.50 could get you 12 or so miles it would work out to be $0.29/mile plus an hour of your time. if one gets 40-45 mpg gas in HEV mode and if gas is $6.00/gallon the cost is around $0.13 to $0.15 per mile. Really doesn’t make economic sense to top up at $3.50 per hour until gas is more than $11.60/gallon assuming 40 mpg (gets worse if mpg is higher).
Yes, $3.50 seems really high.
 

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I agree with all the previous by PHEV owners.

I'm quite happy with my 2019 PHEV Niro and am averaging 125 MPGe with it. Since 95% of its miles are in the city, it can take 6 months or more to use a tank of gas & I get concerned that the gas may deteriorate to the point of it not being "good" for the engine. Maybe that is a fallacy. But at times I think perhaps I should have gotten the EV although given the fact that I only drive 6000 - 8000 miles / year, the cost per mile of the EV would be significantly more than the PHEV. As Vangone correctly stated, the cost of the PHEV is almost the same as the HEV if one qualifies for the Fed Tax Credit which makes purchasing the HEV a losing proposition unless one drives over 100 miles daily.

Long answer -- yes, I'd buy buy a PHEV again -- but I would take a hard look and long test drive in the Ford Escape & Mitsubishi Outlander PHEVs before deciding on another Niro PHEV. Not because I don't like my Niro. Rather my wife doesn't like it as much because of all the tech (bells & whistles literally) and because the new Escape & Outlander both have a longer EV range than the Niro.

Wishing you well in the complicated car purchasing decision...
 
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I agree with all the previous by PHEV owners.

I'm quite happy with my 2019 PHEV Niro and am averaging 125 MPGe with it. Since 95% of its miles are in the city, it can take 6 months or more to use a tank of gas & I get concerned that the gas may deteriorate to the point of it not being "good" for the engine. Maybe that is a fallacy. But at times I think perhaps I should have gotten the EV although given the fact that I only drive 6000 - 8000 miles / year, the cost per mile of the EV would be significantly more than the PHEV. As Vangone correctly stated, the cost of the PHEV is almost the same as the HEV if one qualifies for the Fed Tax Credit which makes purchasing the HEV a losing proposition unless one drives over 100 miles daily.

Long answer -- yes, I'd buy buy a PHEV again -- but I would take a hard look and long test drive in the Ford Escape & Mitsubishi Outlander PHEVs before deciding on another Niro PHEV. Not because I don't like my Niro. Rather my wife doesn't like it as much because of all the tech (bells & whistles literally) and because the new Escape & Outlander both have a longer EV range than the Niro.

Wishing you well in the complicated car purchasing decision...
If you consider the Outlander PHEV, wait for the new model. The current one doesn't have many great reviews. The current '22 is still the old version. There isn't a new version PHEV just yet. Also, remember the new one is essentially a Nissan Rogue under the skin, and the PHEV will most-likely have a Nissan PHEV setup, for better or worse.
 

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it can take 6 months or more to use a tank of gas & I get concerned that the gas may deteriorate to the point of it not being "good" for the engine.
It's probably not too big a deal if you're using quality gas in the first place. And by quality I don't mean Premium or the other labels they put on higher octane levels. I just mean a First Tier supplier. Since some cars have sat for years and still run on the same fuel, I don't think gas overall will go "bad" in a matter of months. But what I did was top mine off every few months, just to add a bit of fresh fuel to the tank. In the winter I put gas in about once a month, since the ICE is needed for heat and I used more gas. That will change with the 2023 version, since it's supposed to have an electric heater like the EVs do.
 
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Also, remember the new one is essentially a Nissan Rogue under the skin
I had a Rogue as a rental last week. Wasn't impressed with it overall. Mostly because I was uncomfortable in the driver's seat because my left foot didn't have space to rest. The top of my foot was pushed to the side by the sidewall. The dead pedal isn't large enough to give my foot enough space, and I don't have that large of a shoe size. I'd hate to think what someone with a shoe over size 10 would think. I had the same issue when I tried driving a Leaf, so it must be a Nissan thing.
 
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I had a Rogue as a rental last week. Wasn't impressed with it overall. Mostly because I was uncomfortable in the driver's seat because my left foot didn't have space to rest. The top of my foot was pushed to the side by the sidewall. The dead pedal isn't large enough to give my foot enough space, and I don't have that large of a shoe size. I'd hate to think what someone with a shoe over size 10 would think. I had the same issue when I tried driving a Leaf, so it must be a Nissan thing.
For me at 6 foot 4, and size 13 shoes, Nissans are out of the question LOL
 

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atc98092: I do use top tier & suspect that you're probably correct. The gas today is far better than 30-40 yrs ago when the idea that gas more than 6 months old was "harmful". Old ideas die hard! 🙄
RedGeminiPA: Yes I'm aware that the 2023 Outlander will be a major improvement over the 22 model. I've got a soft spot for Mitsu as we had a 93 Mitsu Expo which served our family well for about 5 years. .
 

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I just noticed something else. My wife and I were at a restaurant the other day and while waiting for her to get out of the car, I noted a charging station close by. It said the rate was $3.50 and hour and I am going to assume that was a level 2 charger. On this site it has been noted that it takes the Niro PHEV about 2.5 hours to charge up completely with a level 2 charger. So if my PHEV got 30 miles on electric only, it was empty of charge, and if I tried to charge my Niro PHEV there while we ate for an hour, it would add about 12 miles range to the battery (roughly) for my $3.50. Am I correct about this or off base? I am still trying to get a handle on this charging thing. Thanks for any help anyone can provide.
I use Chargepoint while shopping. The one at my grocery store is 10 cents per kwh. In the most expensive town in my county the one on main street charges 29 cents per kwh. Heck the Volta chargers at my local Safeway are free.

3.50 for an hour of level 2 is a ripoff.
 

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I use Chargepoint while shopping. The one at my grocery store is 10 cents per kwh. In the most expensive town in my county the one on main street charges 29 cents per kwh. Heck the Volta chargers at my local Safeway are free.
A few days ago, I had my first public charging experience and my first free charging experience. I was at the local hospital lab for a blood test & parked at a free charging station. I arrived with 59% charge & left with 83%.

Only hiccup is I had to play the door lock/unlock game to remove the charging plug when it was time to leave. (I usually do not lock the car for quick errands.)
 
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