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Discussion Starter #1
One of the few disappointments of my 2018 Niro are the rims and covers. The description on the website stated Alloy Wheels with Full Covers or something like that and I totally missed the covers part. But, I didn’t want to move up to the Touring Trim with the 19” wheels.

Has anyone replaced their wheels? And did you notice a hit on mpg?
 

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The plastic covers are totally cosmetic. So if you are happy with the black aloy behind the covers, then simply remove them. There are loads of off the shelf 3rd party rims that have the correct size, offset and bolt pattern that are hub-centric if you want to change the hubs. You will likely not see any difference in the MPG if you stick with the same size tires. The 18" rims have a wider tire so they have a greater rolling resistance. if you went with a 15" rim and put on a 195/70R15 tire that just a thinner, then you would get an improved MPG. As well, a 15" rim will likely weigh less, where an 18" rim would be heavier.


I have a set of 17" rims from my old Edge, but I am getting rid of them as the cost of the tire along with the added rolling resistance doens't make it worth keeping them. My plan is to use the Michelin tires for the next 3 years then toss them and likely upgrade to a set of Nokian WRG3 SUV tires that I can use year round. I will just live with the rims and covers as they don't bother me even though I know the plastic covers with likely crack and die withing the next 4 years (from past experiance) and I will just have the back aloy rims as they are fine by me.
 

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I have installed the original tires on new aftermarket alloy 16 inch mags and will install winter tires with the original black alloy mags without the cover caps.!
 

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I was planning on doing the same thing but meant buying sensors extra $200. Seems cheaper to just change tires each spring and fall. Tires only last 2-3 years then you have to change out anyways.
 

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You don't have to buy sensors. Check pressure manually. My tires last much longer than a couple years, and their lifespan would double if I had two sets of tires.
 

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The sensors are there for a reason. We are supposed to check the tire pressure on our wheels every couple of weeks at a minimum. Honestly, over the past year how often have, you checked? My wife got some new tires for her old Kia Sportage after she went out shopping and came back to the car to find one tire totally flat. It wasn't that there was a puncture, but rather the sidewalls had degraded enough with age they started to leak even though there was loads of tread left on the tire.



Her new tires for whatever reason, one of them had a slow and inconsistent leak. It would be fine for most of the time then suddenly it seemed to lose pressure. I had checked her tires on the weekend and they were all correct. By the Thursday, the one tire was running 15psi. Again, no puncture and I pumped it up to the required 40psi and it held that for the next 4 weeks. Why did it loose pressure? when did it loose pressure? luckily it was a rear tire and not a front one that you need the psi to keep good steering. A TPMS would have told her that a tire was losing pressure when it happened. I don't know if she had been driving for one day or four with the low pressure. She said the ever so helpful, it looked wrong a few days ago, but didn't bother to check the pressure, or even tell me.



So you might think TPMS is a waste of time, but don't go around thinking that it doesn't do anything. it's like the crash avoidance. You should not need it, but it could save your life.
 

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When a tire loses enough pressure to trigger a warning, it will be readily visible. Useful enough if ever checked on the dash to optimize efficiency, or for ultra low profile tires that always look flat.
 

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That is a snazzy looking car. It does make it look far more upscale than we have with the plastic hubcaps that are supposed to help reduce wind drag around the wheels.
 

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Have you confirmed a persistent warning with no TPMS installed on wheels? Or the just the failure on one wheel?
Yes the warning comes up on dash then you have to reset to wherever screen you use plus the Tpms warning is always there.
 

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Interesting. They should have included a way to turn off such a warning. Some markets, like Canada, there is no TPMS installed at all. Just one line of programming. It is likely the dealer can make such a change.
 

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Interesting. They should have included a way to turn off such a warning. Some markets, like Canada, there is no TPMS installed at all. Just one line of programming. It is likely the dealer can make such a change.

Sorry I don't get your logic there. Just because “Transport Canada’s research has not identified that TPMS provide any potential safety benefits to Canadians,” doesn't mean that if you car comes with a TPMS sensor installed that you should be able to simply turn it off. From Kia's perspective, if they did then they open themselves up to getting sued by some moron who will say they didn't realize the system was turned off and when they got into an accident that could have been prevented has the system been turned on.


The thought is if the warning light on your dash is so bothersume every morning, it only costs a few hundred dollars to get it fixed.
 

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A few hundred dollars for something you can check manually with a one dollar gauge? Don't get your logic. There was a similar diatribe I read recently about the lack of a low washer fluid warning. Big safety issue and poster had not had a car that didn't have it. Well, I've never had a car that had it, and the Niro is my first car with TPMS. I like it, but would I have paid a few hundred dollars more for it as an option? No.

If TPMS was a selling feature, I'd think Kia would have included it in Canada. No reason to wait until mandated by law. It was mandated in the US following the Firestone scandal in the US where tread separation caused a lot of deaths in the rollover prone Ford Explorer in the late 1990s. Mandated TPMS had quite a delay, not taking effect until the 2007 model year. Of course, TPMS would not have prevented these deaths, typical regulatory overkill. Canadians did not overreact then and still haven't. What does that tell you? Rational regulation or lobbyist influence?
 

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If TPMS was a selling feature, I'd think Kia would have included it in Canada. No reason to wait until mandated by law. It was mandated in the US following the Firestone scandal in the US where tread separation caused a lot of deaths in the rollover prone Ford Explorer in the late 1990s. Mandated TPMS had quite a delay, not taking effect until the 2007 model year. Of course, TPMS would not have prevented these deaths, typical regulatory overkill. Canadians did not overreact then and still haven't. What does that tell you? Rational regulation or lobbyist influence?

But I live in Canada and my 2018 Niro came with the TPMS pressure sensors standard. I don't know why someone decided that they don't come with Canadain versions of the Niro? We don't have any of the UVO software connectivity right now, but that has nothing to do with wheel tire pressure safety. I am very impressed with how it works on the Niro, in I get individual wheel sensor readings rather than just a ! in a triagnle to say that something is wrong but no idea what.
 

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A few hundred dollars for something you can check manually with a one dollar gauge? Don't get your logic. There was a similar diatribe I read recently about the lack of a low washer fluid warning. Big safety issue and poster had not had a car that didn't have it. Well, I've never had a car that had it, and the Niro is my first car with TPMS. I like it, but would I have paid a few hundred dollars more for it as an option? No.

If TPMS was a selling feature, I'd think Kia would have included it in Canada. No reason to wait until mandated by law. It was mandated in the US following the Firestone scandal in the US where tread separation caused a lot of deaths in the rollover prone Ford Explorer in the late 1990s. Mandated TPMS had quite a delay, not taking effect until the 2007 model year. Of course, TPMS would not have prevented these deaths, typical regulatory overkill. Canadians did not overreact then and still haven't. What does that tell you? Rational regulation or lobbyist influence?
I don't know that it is a selling feature, but TPMS is included on the Niro in Canada. Has been since its release. Maybe not the lower models, but I have it on my '17 EX Prem. It's a nice to have, but shouldn't be relied on.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
How does the Niro TPMS decide if the tires are low on air? Is it doing it by rotational frequency of the wheels? The tire pressure display shows around 47 for each tire. Is that the psi? That seems to be a lot of it is. All my other cars are around lower to mid 30’s.
 

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Yes. That is the PSI. The tpms system had a transmitter attached to each of the wheels. if you climb under the car and look you can see the small wire running to the sensor around the middle of the hub. Then it has a set of recievers inside each of the tires that have a centrifical switch I believe so they don't turn on until you are driving with enough speed to flip the switch. (some are motion activated) Then they respond back to the sensor the PSI along with the temp of the air inside.



The warning light is generally triggered by ether a large change in PSI or if one sensor is different from any of the others. So if your sensors were all at reading your 47psi and then dropped down to 5psi, it would trigger an event. Also likewise, if one wheel is at 37psi and the rest are at your 47psi then you would also get a warning. You don't need to have a flat to get a trigger event.



As for your tires being rather high. The max PSI rating for these tires I believe is actually 55psi. so running them at 47 is totally fine. you are getting a better fuel economy from the tires as your dropping your rolling resistance, but at the cost of a much harsher ride as there is not as much bounce in your tire to absorb road bumps.
 
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