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Doubtful the extra pressure accounted for the cracking. I'm sure 40 lbs is well within the tire manufacturer's specification. Recommendations by the car manufacturer is related to the car weight and use - usually best for maximum life and optimal handling.
 

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I'm on track to get 90,000 miles on my OEM Michelins. They are an excellent balance of superior longevity and quiet comfort (the 16" ones). Obviously good value even after the sticker shock if you are keeping your car for the long term. If you are trading in, sure get the cheapest tires you can buy.

Yes, there are better tires for rain and snow, but these tires are average, not horrible. In my own traction tests in the snow, any slipping was easily corrected. Nothing to do with the tires of course, just the car's weight balance. In fact, it is the best car I've owned over 45 years worth of cars for safe handling in bad conditions.

You can bet I'm going to pony up to replace the OEMs with an identical set. And I'm a cheapskate! But to that point, I would not be happy with the probable 3 to 5 mpg hit other tires will inflict on how long my tank lasts.
Thanks for this info. Just got '19 Plug-in. Living in VT, I just put Michelin ICE real snow tires so the OEMs will only see summers, hopefully 90K of summer use will take about 10 years!
 

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All tires require a balancing act. The Niro with the Michelin OEMs emphasize the high MPG result - and considering that these are necessarily low rolling resistance - they are surprisingly good for tight road handling - even in wet conditions. I haven't really tested in snow, but I'm expecting that they will be pretty mediocre in that regard (as are pretty much all good energy-saving tires). It will be interesting to see how folks rate replacement all-season tires that trade in some energy savings for traction on snow and ice. My sense is that the long wheelbase and substantial wheel weight directly over both axles makes this a superb all weather driver overall - not needing AWD when FWD is so well designed. (I had a Tucson six-cylinder AWD that wasn't as good in MN snow as the FWD C-max with low clearance... so sometimes AWD is just a gas-robbing marketing ploy when designed in as an afterthought.)

I think the most-comprehensive tests are done over at TireRack.com - and the preference should be based mostly on how you drive, and where you drive. If I was in a warm climate (as in anywhere that doesn't typically get more than one 4" snow yearly), I think the Michelin OEMs are probably as good as anything available, especially if preserving the gas mileage is a high priority.
 

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So no, these are not snow tires. That said, the Niro is the best handling car in snow I've ever had by far. No doubt due to the weight balance. Slides in snow are easily correctable without overcorrection. At least as tested in a large parking lot. For obvious reasons, not really willing to try at highway speeds (not that I've had an opportunity in the last two years - not much snow).
 
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