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Hi all,

I’m shopping for new insurance, if I’m able to prove that my Niro 2018 EX has a passive alarm I can get a good deal, however, I have been reading that the dealer activates it for you (for a hefty price). Is this the case; is anyone able to confirm that these vehicles have passive alarms pre-built into them?
 

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I don't think I have one on mine. You can test it this way. Next time you drive, when you stop turn the car off. Exit the car with your key. Shut your car door and walk away (don't lock it and don't press any button on the key fob). Put your key down at least 20' away. Go up to the car and shake it a lot. If the alarm goes off, it has a passive alarm activated. If not, you don't. Not sure how you'll prove it to the insurance company.
 

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I can confirm my 2018 Niro PHEV has a passive alarm built into it. See your Owner's Manual under Theft-alarm system.
The system is on by default, unless you ask a dealer to disable it. You can't test the system, as you would have to break into your locked car to see if it comes on.
You can prove it to the insurance company by showing them the passage in the Owner's Manual - however since they get all manufacturers' info, they should know this already.
 

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I don't think I have one on mine. You can test it this way. Next time you drive, when you stop turn the car off. Exit the car with your key. Shut your car door and walk away (don't lock it and don't press any button on the key fob). Put your key down at least 20' away. Go up to the car and shake it a lot. If the alarm goes off, it has a passive alarm activated. If not, you don't. Not sure how you'll prove it to the insurance company.
If the car isn’t locked, no alarm would be set. That doesn’t seem to be a valid test.
 

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I gather that "passive" alarm sets itself. The Niro has to be actively set by locking the doors. Unless the always blinking red light on the dash counts as a passive alarm!
 

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I'm thinking "passive alarm" is an insurance company term. In the owners manual I can only find on page 4-15 through 4-19 talk of the anti theft feature and the engine immobilizer system. I wonder if the insurance company accepts the engine immobilizer system to be a "passive alarm" since the vehicle operator has nothing to do with it. Supposedly if you don't have the smart key you can't start the car.
 

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I can confirm my 2018 Niro PHEV has a passive alarm built into it. See your Owner's Manual under Theft-alarm system.
The system is on by default, unless you ask a dealer to disable it. You can't test the system, as you would have to break into your locked car to see if it comes on.
You can prove it to the insurance company by showing them the passage in the Owner's Manual - however since they get all manufacturers' info, they should know this already.
I'm looking at the Owner's Manual for my 2018 PHEV and I don't see anything about a "passive" alarm. My manual describes three alarm modes: Disarmed, Armed and Theft Alarm. It says that the system is armed either by locking the doors with the fob or using the key. Nothing about passive functionality. Plus, it states that the alarm is triggered by opening any door, the liftgate or the hood without the smart key, so you could test it by rolling the windows down, setting the alarm and then opening a door from the inside.

Unless we're talking about a different definition of "passive" I don't think the Niro has one. Based on this link, I think the alarm in the Niro would qualify as "Active" or "Non-Passive" as you need to lock the doors to arm it. Unless as FlNiro mentioned the immobilizer counts.

https://www.autoinsurancequotes.com/glossary/passive-alarm
 

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You don't seem to understand what a passive alarm is and how it differs from an active alarm.

A passive alarm turns on automatically. Once the key is removed and all the doors to the vehicle are closed, the alarm turns itself on. This function gives the alarm the name “passive,” as the driver does nothing to arm it.

An active alarm must be activated by the driver. The driver must turn the system on, commonly done by clicking a button on a remote. The active role played by the driver in arming this alarm results in this being called an “active” alarm.

So therefore, even though the manual doesn't specifically spell it out, the Kia Niro has a passive alarm.

https://www.dedona.com/differences-between-passive-active-alarm-systems/
 

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I meant to say ...once the key is removed and all the doors to the vehicle are locked, the alarm automatically turns itself on ... it is built into the system (i.e. factory installed) and this is a passive system, since no further action is required by the driver to turn it on.

Why don't you ask your insurance company for their definition of active vs. passive and go with that?
 

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I meant to say ...once the key is removed and all the doors to the vehicle are locked, the alarm automatically turns itself on ... it is built into the system (i.e. factory installed) and this is a passive system, since no further action is required by the driver to turn it on.

Why don't you ask your insurance company for their definition of active vs. passive and go with that?
I concur that this would be my definition, in that it is integrated with the car's systems and does not require action solely to enable the alarm. If locking the doors also activates the alarm, I would consider that passive. I know of no alarm that would activate automatically on an unlocked vehicle, and not certain I would want one. I have no need for an alarm to be activated when my car is locked within my garage at night, and the car remains unlocked.
 

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You don't seem to understand what a passive alarm is and how it differs from an active alarm.

A passive alarm turns on automatically. Once the key is removed and all the doors to the vehicle are closed, the alarm turns itself on. This function gives the alarm the name “passive,” as the driver does nothing to arm it.

An active alarm must be activated by the driver. The driver must turn the system on, commonly done by clicking a button on a remote. The active role played by the driver in arming this alarm results in this being called an “active” alarm.

So therefore, even though the manual doesn't specifically spell it out, the Kia Niro has a passive alarm.

https://www.dedona.com/differences-between-passive-active-alarm-systems/
Sorry, that's not correct. The alarm in the Kia is not set unless the doors are locked. In order to do that you need to either press the button on the remote or lock the doors with the key. In either case the driver has to arm the alarm by locking the doors. Therefore the alarm in the Kia is not passive.

From the Owner's Manual:
The Manual said:
Park the vehicle and stop the engine. Arm the system as described below.

1. Turn off the engine
2. Make sure that all doors (and lift-gate) and engine hood are closed and latched.
3. Lock the doors by depressing the door lock button on the smart key.

After completion of the steps above, the hazard warning lights will blink (for smart key, the chime also sounds) once to indicate that the system is armed
If the alarm was passive there would be no need for driver to arm the system by locking the doors.

Now, you could argue that the immobilizer implements a sort of passive alarm, but I don't think it activates the lights or horn but rather just prevents the vehicle from being driven.
 

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If the alarm was passive there would be no need for driver to arm the system by locking the doors.

So if this were the case then if I were to stop at a shop, for example, and leave my wife in the car, close the doors then on my return the alarm would sound when I opened the door!

A passive alarm is one that is always activated when all doors, tailgate and bonnet (or should I say hood) are correctly closed and locked without further driver intervention.
 

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So if this were the case then if I were to stop at a shop, for example, and leave my wife in the car, close the doors then on my return the alarm would sound when I opened the door!

A passive alarm is one that is always activated when all doors, tailgate and bonnet (or should I say hood) are correctly closed and locked without further driver intervention.
>:) If you left your wife in the car and walked away and she started screaming at you, would that be considered a Passive Alarm>:)?
 

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insurance companies know which cars come with an anti-theft system or not.


Then, I don't know what definition of "massive" you have, but an anti-theft system may give you a 5% discount. So maybe $20-30 for the Niro...


Plus, sounding alarm that could theoretically alert if someone tried to break into your car (or more likely that a win gust just happened or the cat jumped on your hood), don't give you extra insurance points. Most insurances don't give discount for an alarm.


With the Niro, if you don't have the key near the starter, the engine will never start. That is what the red blinking light is telling you. Also, the car locks itself. Hard to be more passive than that. If you pay attention, you will see that you do not need to push the lock button on your key fob for the red light to start blinking.
 

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Red light will blink when car is off and fob is still in car. I sleep in my car on trips, and when I do so in a field (planning on leaving before daylight) I have to cover the red LED so no one can notice where I'm parked.
 

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So if this were the case then if I were to stop at a shop, for example, and leave my wife in the car, close the doors then on my return the alarm would sound when I opened the door!

A passive alarm is one that is always activated when all doors, tailgate and bonnet (or should I say hood) are correctly closed and locked without further driver intervention.
Decades ago, I had an alarm installed in my wife’s Miata and if you shut all the doors, it would arm itself after a set amount of time. The car did not have power locks, so the alarm system couldn’t lock the doors. It was kind of a pain if you were standingnext to the car talking to someone in a parking lot and the alarm would keep turning itself on.
 
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