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Discussion Starter #1
Many experts say to keep the battery at 20% to 80% of maximum charge as much as possible to maximize battery life.

Does anyone know Kia's recommendations?

Is there a setting that stops charging at 80%?
 

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It is done automatically by algorithms. The display on your dash is not the true SOC, just use it as a relative reference so you know when to force EV mode. You can neither overcharge nor drain the battery flat. About the only way to get over whatever the parameters that Kia has set is to be fully charged and go down a long hill in regen. Even then there is a hard limit that will turn off regen and switch to engine braking.
 

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BTW, even the EV model will have constraints (or a buffer). But with a pure EV, charging it to user allowed limits to max the range will have a hit on battery longevity. Unless max range is needed, it should only be charged to no more than 80% depending on the daily range needs. And that can be set by the user in the car or the external charger.

Not an issue for the PHEV, or HEV for that matter. Out of our control.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
BTW, even the EV model will have constraints (or a buffer). But with a pure EV, charging it to user allowed limits to max the range will have a hit on battery longevity. Unless max range is needed, it should only be charged to no more than 80% depending on the daily range needs. And that can be set by the user in the car or the external charger.

Not an issue for the PHEV, or HEV for that matter. Out of our control.
Thanks for the feedback.

However, I don't understand why if it makes sense for the EV user to charge less than the system will allow, why it wouldn't also make sense for the PHEV user to do the same?
 

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You have perhaps 26 miles max range in the PHEV. Why wouldn't you want to maximize that? Most go that far in a single day and it saves you money versus burning gas. You will not be charging over 70/80%. The algorithms won't allow it. Going lower does no good.

In the EV, you only want to maximize range on days you will actually need it. Going lower does no harm.
 

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These batteries have buffers in them. A UK site stated only 7.1 of 8.9kWh of usable battery. Additionally there is some active cooling management by way of a small fan which blows over the battery to cool it down, I actually heard mine today with the music off.

Back onto why fully charge? It’s a smaller batter only around 400lbs, so it’s easier and cheaper to replace in comparison To other BEVs and plugins. You have a 100k warranty as well. I just moved to the SF Bay Area, traded my 2013 Leaf for the Niro PHEV and after 306mi I’ve still been on 9/10 full of gas. Keep the car plugged in, it maintains the battery, and just drive it. I’ll put over 100k on the car over the next 4 years.
 

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PHEV battery life maximization is already designed & built into the battery system. Nothing really for the user to do, but use it. You are overthinking it.
 

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Just to add, you have 100,000 mile warranty on the battery from Kia. True, it doesn't cover battery degradation (normal loss of capacity), but the aggressive battery management algorithm makes for a very long battery life.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
These batteries have buffers in them. A UK site stated only 7.1 of 8.9kWh of usable battery. Additionally there is some active cooling management by way of a small fan which blows over the battery to cool it down, I actually heard mine today with the music off.

Back onto why fully charge? It’s a smaller batter only around 400lbs, so it’s easier and cheaper to replace in comparison To other BEVs and plugins. You have a 100k warranty as well. I just moved to the SF Bay Area, traded my 2013 Leaf for the Niro PHEV and after 306mi I’ve still been on 9/10 full of gas. Keep the car plugged in, it maintains the battery, and just drive it. I’ll put over 100k on the car over the next 4 years.
EPA rates the Niro PHEV at 32Kwhrs/100mi. Given the stated 26 mile range this means (26/100 x 32kwhrs ) 8.3 KWhrs is usable of max 8.9. So the MCU will run the battery between 5 and 100% of capacity.

So yes, you can let the MCU manage the battery and depend on the warranty. You can also decide that if you do not want to run between 6 and 100% of capacity but rather 40 and 80% your battery will last longer. Much like an ICE can redline at 6000 rpm but it you run it there all the time you will limit the engine life considerably.

My typical daily use is 5-10 miles so it is no inconvenience at all to start charge at <40% (10mi range) and stop charging at >80% (20mi range).
 

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How much charging is too much?

We just took delivery of our new 2018 Niro PHEV, it was on the dealer lot for almost a year.

On our second day of use, we drove almost 50 miles, charging it 5 times. Wife will be using it run short errands daily and we will probably charge it 4-6 times a day. Charging will be over night and when ever she is at home, to make sure the battery is topped up. We are using a standard 120V outlet.

The plan is to only use gas on trips that exceed 24 miles (even fully charged the displayed range never exceeds 24 miles). Most driving will be 1-4 mile errands, with frequent stops at home. Daily use will probably be 30-40 miles a day.
 

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< our new 2018 Niro PHEV, it was on the dealer lot for almost a year. >.
Holy cow! Where was that & why did it languish on the lot so long? Curious what sort of discount from MSRP you got on that one?
 

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< our new 2018 Niro PHEV, it was on the dealer lot for almost a year. >.
Holy cow! Where was that & why did it languish on the lot so long? Curious what sort of discount from MSRP you got on that one?
Beaverton, OR. We found it online for ~$27k, but the dealer wanted another $1k for some BS clear coat protection package. The price was still better than any other so we accepted their BS fee. When the car arrived we found scratches on the driver side door and rear bumper. Some protection package??? They are blaming the transporter, even though the manager signed off on the damage when he handed the car over to the transporter. Additionally the inside of the car was quite dirty, with debris and gum wrappers and all the stickers are still in the windows.

We are still fighting with the dealer to have the car repaired and cleaned. This is my first ever car purchase and it has been a nightmare.
 

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The plan is to only use gas on trips that exceed 24 miles (even fully charged the displayed range never exceeds 24 miles).

The car does an automatic 2 mile reduction on the electric battery remaining if the climate control is running. If you turn it off, it will put the 2 miles back on.
 

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The plan is to only use gas on trips that exceed 24 miles (even fully charged the displayed range never exceeds 24 miles). Most driving will be 1-4 mile errands, with frequent stops at home. Daily use will probably be 30-40 miles a day.
Depending on your route, speeds, and all the other usual factors, you will likely get closer to 30 miles or more of EV range. My commute is 34 miles round trip. I use Hybrid mode when climbing a long hill at freeway speeds, probably about 3 miles total once I kick it back to EV mode. It takes a lot of battery power to climb the hill, so it's more efficient to use the engine. I usually get home with 3-4 miles range remaining. And that is using the A/C going home in the afternoon when temps are in the 80s.

Straight freeway cruising the 24-25 mile EV range is pretty accurate. Throw in lower speeds and some regen when you aren't in the freeway and the range increases pretty nicely. :)
 
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