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Hi, I've just acquired a 2017 used phev with 64000km (~40k miles) and a full charge shows 58km(36mi) ev range but the moment I leave my garage and start descending my street for 10m(32feet) it immediately drops to 55km(34mi) and after another 10m I lose more 5km(3.1mi) being left with 50km(31mi) range. But in fact Im only able to achieve 45km(27mi) max. (I have some hills where I live)
Is this behavior normal?
 

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2022 Bolt EUV Premier
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I suspect your GOM (guess-o-meter) isn't very accurate. I would lose 2 miles of range in a bit under 1 mile, but that was when I left my driveway and went up the hill instead of down. In most plug-in cars, the GOM is a bit hit or miss. The 2017 PHEV wasn't available in the US, so I don't know what (if any) differences it had from what we had here.

In the US the PHEV was rated for 26 miles of EV range (24 with HVAC on), but real world I generally got 30 miles. Terrain and driving technique has a huge impact on what sort of range you get in EV mode. Assuming your battery is the same size that we have here, 27 miles of EV range is in the ballpark. Hills can wreak havoc on EV range. The hill I live on hurt the range of my Niro PHEV, and it has the same effect on my Bolt EUV.
 

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The range changes based on it's estimation of past driving. Even new they were never rated at 36 miles ev range so don't pay attention to what it shows. People usually get 25-30 miles EV range so you are getting what is expected. Using a/c, defrost, heated seats, headlights will all cause the range to drop.
 

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When I go uphill in my Niro EV, even a moderate incline understandably shoots power consumption WAY up. That's just simple physics. It's the same for any power source, of course. Payback is when you return and are going downhill. Even if you use the accellerator pedal moderately or leave cruise on, you're still using much less power going downhill. When we have an EV or hybrid, as an exercise in conservation (and it's a bit of a game too), many of us like to coast downhill when we can and use the steering wheel paddles (if available) to moderate speed in order to gain battery range. Even the brakes incorporate regeneration. Speaking for myself, when there are vehicles close behind me, I try and stay at least at the speed limit or a bit faster when coasting.
 

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When I go uphill in my Niro EV, even a moderate incline understandably shoots power consumption WAY up. That's just simple physics. It's the same for any power source, of course. Payback is when you return and are going downhill. Even if you use the accellerator pedal moderately or leave cruise on, you're still using much less power going downhill. When we have an EV or hybrid, as an exercise in conservation (and it's a bit of a game too), many of us like to coast downhill when we can and use the steering wheel paddles (if available) to moderate speed in order to gain battery range. Even the brakes incorporate regeneration. Speaking for myself, when there are vehicles close behind me, I try and stay at least at the speed limit or a bit faster when coasting.
I believe the PHEV regenerates when going downhill in cruise control. At least the charging indicator so indicates. And, yes coasting saves momentum although not as much as I got with my old manual transmission Subaru when I would hold the clutch petal down for coasting. It is probably not wise to shift an auto trans. into neutral for coasting -- a disadvantage of an auto transmission.

A couple days ago, I noticed the brake lights were on while coasting down from a mountain in cruise when the regen. meter showed 4 or 5 bars. But later with 6 or 7 bars showing the brake lights did not light. In both cases, I used the cruse, not the regen. levers.
 

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One big difference is that a manual transmission in an ICE car does nothing to return energy to the energy source. Downshifting when slowing down, however, does make your brakes last longer.
 

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It decides to use brakelights on regen based on speed decal rate and level so the brake lights may come on anytime or not. Yes cruise will regen if needed to keep from overspending. Smart cruise will apply brakes too if getting to close to the car in front and regen is not enough.
 

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Gotta be careful with that smart cruise. Does NOT stop reliably or (typically) at all for a stationary object in front, including a car. I've noted this on here before. This behavior is not limited to Niros. I've experienced the exact same behavior in a '21 Outback owned by a family member.
 

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2019 White PHEV EX Prem, Mich Premier AS tires, LED BU lights, window visors 2022 Subaru OB Touring
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Gotta be careful with that smart cruise. Does NOT stop reliably or (typically) at all for a stationary object in front, including a car. I've noted this on here before. This behavior is not limited to Niros. I've experienced the exact same behavior in a '21 Outback owned by a family member.
That is disappointing & alarming! So far my 2019 Niro & 2022 Outback seem to be stopping properly on the few occasions when I wasn't being a proactive as I should have been.-- not that I have put either one to the test frequently. :rolleyes:
 

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I forgot to say that someone mentioned this behavior as "expected," whether you like it or not.

Example: You're following a moving car and coming to a red light. The car in front of is slowing, and your smart cruise slows you down. Then the car in front of you suddenly changes lanes, and there's a stopped car in your lane at the light. Your car with smart cruise active will not slow down for the stopped car - INDEED IT MIGHT SPEED UP!!! - might beep at you and slam on the brakes a little too late, but as you can imagine, I've not gone that far.
 
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