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How well are people doing with the purely electric range on the PHEV? I just started paying enough attention to see I got 32.3 miles with AC and seat vent going one day (0 miles range left, but had not switched off electric and still showed 999 mpg on the trip info), as well as 26.3 with 5 miles of range still showing after having driver and passenger AC on for half of that.
 

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How well are people doing with the purely electric range on the PHEV? I just started paying enough attention to see I got 32.3 miles with AC and seat vent going one day (0 miles range left, but had not switched off electric and still showed 999 mpg on the trip info), as well as 26.3 with 5 miles of range still showing after having driver and passenger AC on for half of that.
I've seen similar results with mine as well. I regularly get 30 or so miles with the AC on, even on the highway. With the AC off on surface streets I suspect I could easily get even more but my drives are pretty short in those conditions. The 26 mile estimate is fairly conservative so if everything is working well you should be able to beat it easily.

There's a guy on here who evidently works for Kia that has talked about the limits of the PHEV range and it's pretty impressive actually. You'd have to go full hyper-miler to see these results but still it's pretty amazing what 8.9kWh can do.

Kia guy here.
...The Niro can get up to ≈50 miles/81 km on a charge at 24 MPH/40KPH steady state, (I tried that on a track) so if you pick routes that stay closer to that speed, you can get further. 47.4 miles is my record on public roads staying in 25 and 30 mph zones with AC, Radio, and seats OFF, and driving such that my driving style was 98% Eco under the driving style tab in the supervision cluster menu.
 

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Yeah, I've seen low 30s with mine. That requires staying off the freeway, so there's more opportunities to regen, but unless it's a mild day that includes the A/C on and the seat ventilation running. My work round trip is 31 miles, but it's uphill both ways. I use HEV mode to climb the morning hill (about 1 1/2 mile), arriving at work showing 14 miles remaining. I get really good energy use going home, and usually arrive with 3 miles remaining after climbing the short (1/2 mile) but steep hill to my home. While I attempt to get the most I can from regen, I don't consider my driving style anywhere near hyper-mileing. I'm sure with more effort I could get it closer to 30 miles EV, but I hate being "that driver" that annoys other drivers. :)
 

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...That requires staying off the freeway, so there's more opportunities to regen...
Actually the most efficient way to travel is at a steady pace, no slowing down like Mike says in the quote I posted above. Regen is nice, but it just prevents the complete loss of energy due to slowing down in the first place. TANSTAAFL after all.

I regularly make a 40 mile trip almost entirely on the highway at 60+ mph and I still get 30 miles or more of EV range.

Oh, also:

...but it's uphill both ways
Is that you Dad? :D
 

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Actually the most efficient way to travel is at a steady pace, no slowing down like Mike says in the quote I posted above. Regen is nice, but it just prevents the complete loss of energy due to slowing down in the first place. TANSTAAFL after all.

I regularly make a 40 mile trip almost entirely on the highway at 60+ mph and I still get 30 miles or more of EV range.

Oh, also:



Is that you Dad? :D
Stay off my lawn! >:)

I agree about steady speed. But I still find that taking the freeway home compared to a slightly shorter (2 miles) non-freeway route makes a noticeable difference in my range. Most likely the higher freeway speeds (65+) negate the improvement from more steady speed driving. Now if I could just stay in the valley and not have to climb out, I'm sure I would have been able to stay EV my entire commute at our previous office location. It was about a mile further each way, but almost completely flat, steady speed the majority of the distance. In fact, the dealer I leased from is very near there, so the day I drove the car home (about 18 miles) I believe I only used about 13-14 miles of range. And of course I had my last mile hill to climb to my home.
 

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Yeah, it would be a trick! :) I live on a hill, so I get to go down but the battery is already full. I have to climb a much higher hill to get to work. Coming home I do get some regen coming back down that hill, but then I have to climb the hill to get back to my home. So yeah, uphill both ways... :D
 

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Not sure if this is on-topic, but I recently started noticing the displayed level (in miles) of gasoline after filling up the fuel tank. When I filled up yesterday, it was 495 miles. On the fillup before that, it was 610 miles.

The total capacity of my 2019 PHEV's tank is 11.4 gallons and I put 10.4 gallons in yesterday, so I don't think I shut off the pump at the gas station prematurely.

There is some information in the manual on page 4-61 which indicates that the number of miles displayed is based on driving habits and the condition of the vehicle.

Has anyone reached any conclusions on how this number is calculated. It must be based on estimated MPG, but what is the MPG based on, and how often is it adjusted?
 

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Yeah, it would be a trick! :) I live on a hill, so I get to go down but the battery is already full. I have to climb a much higher hill to get to work. Coming home I do get some regen coming back down that hill, but then I have to climb the hill to get back to my home. So yeah, uphill both ways... :D
If you live on a hill, have you thought about charging less than 100%? By exactly the amount that you get from regen going down the hill.
 

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If you live on a hill, have you thought about charging less than 100%? By exactly the amount that you get from regen going down the hill.
Yes, I have. But the PHEV has no setting for max charge, at least that I could find. The Uvo Access app has something labeled like it would have one, but there's nothing that I could find. If I could limit it to 98%, then I'd never have the ICE firing up as I'm braking down the hill. Although I did find if I turn up one street before resuming going down the hill, it requires about 15 seconds of drive power, and that's just enough to take enough off the top to let me resume braking the rest of the way down.
 

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The ICE may be engaging simply for engine braking in the absence of regen because the battery is full. This has been reported by both HEV and PHEV owners and you seem to be also saying this.

Do you have scheduled charging? If so, you could set it to start at a time where it won't be full when you start your trip. Another (too expensive) solution would be a sophisticated charge station.
 

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Yes, I do believe it is starting for engine braking, but to be honest it doesn't feel like it does much. I'd prefer the ICE stay off and the controller just dial back the regen so the mechanical brakes have to do the stopping.

I've never used the scheduled charging function. While my start time is generally the same for three days a week, the remaining four are all over the clock. And since I'm on vacation right now, even my usual three days wouldn't be valid. Then there's the problem of deciding when to start charging to only reach 98%, since the car's always at a different SoC when I park for the night. Tonight it's at 73%, but tomorrow might be 25 or it might be 80%. Too many variables to be able to hit a specific charge level. And for my work commute I need every watt that I can get to make the time I need the ICE as little as possible.

Again, I really wish the PHEV has some of the same displays and controls that the EV has.
 

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I did a test drive before buying, and the first thing I noticed is how little engine braking there is, no matter how aggressively you downshifted in Sport mode. I suspect that when engine braking is required such as in your case, there might be a change in valve timing or something to make it work better. The engine might be engaged, and it might have had to rev a little bit to match transmission speed, but I'd bet after that no fuel is burned after that.

So it is interesting that a 2% SOC drop from full charge will allow regen. You might try preconditioning your car with some AC before starting out, or charging your cell phone in the morning, perhaps while streaming music while you are having breakfast. Or turn on interior lights or running lights. Seems a touch wasteful, but it may make sense and limit engine damage from failing to warm up fully. Or actually be more efficient overall if your car is engaging the mechanical brakes to keep a constant speed downhill.
 

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My personal best is now 37.8 miles on electrics. This running errands around a hilly town at low speeds. Interestingly, after backing out of the driveway and climbing a slight hill for about 1/2 mile, the EV range is almost always down to 23 miles.
 

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My personal best is now 37.8 miles on electrics. This running errands around a hilly town at low speeds. Interestingly, after backing out of the driveway and climbing a slight hill for about 1/2 mile, the EV range is almost always down to 23 miles.
ev range = soc * (most recent mpkwhr)

climbing the hill makes your most recent mpkwhr low.
 

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We have a 36 mile round trip we make twice a day. I usually run out of EV range a couple (2-5) miles before completing the round trip but sometime am able to make it all the way back home on EV. Drive is in a mix of city stop and go traffic and main road of 55 mph traffic.

We bought our car in May of 2019. I am interested in seeing how the EV range is affected by winter temperatures. Some say they are disappointed the PHEV doesn't have a heat pump but I am glad it doesn't and the EV range won't be affected by an electric heat pump or electric strip heater pulling down the Hybrid battery charge. I hope since the PHEV uses the engine to heat that the EV range may stay close to the same all year around. In any case I am interested to find out this winter how the range is affected if at all as well as how the Niro does in our snow/slush/ice season coming up from December till March!
 

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The PHEV does have an electric heater. It's only 1kw so not near enough to heat the car. It does, however, do a decent job of defogging. If it ran continuously, it would be a bit more than a 10% hit on EV range. I feel like a heat pump would do better particularly because 1/2 of it is already there but I'm sure KIA considered it.
 

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I am aware that the Niro has a windshield element like most vehicles but that is not what I am referring to.

By strip heater I am talking about an electric heating element that is in the heater box. The Prius as an example has an electric strip heater in the heater box that it will use to supply cabin heat until the engine heat (Hybrid) or heat pump (PHEV) takes over. This resistance element strip heater runs directly off the hybrid battery sucking electricity and EV range from it. I am glad KIA didn't go the heat pump route I would have purchased a Prius if I thought that was a benefit I wanted. I think it is a simple novel idea to run the engine until it gets warm to supply heat and charge the hybrid battery. I am excited to see how this works out this winter. The engine should also be warm and ready to rock and roll if it needs to kick on in cold weather to supply power. I am aware to an EV purist this is blasphemy to actual run the gas engine while you have EV left but I could care less as I am not an EV purist.

I also appreciate KIA using a traditional transmission rather than a CVT , again I would have gone the Prius route if I had wanted a CVT. I actually traded in a 2008 Prius on the new KIA and haven't missed the Prius once.
 

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ev range = soc * (most recent mpkwhr)

climbing the hill makes your most recent mpkwhr low.
I doubt it's quite that simple because if I continued climbing that steep an incline, the car wouldn't do anywhere near 23 miles. I suspect that it uses some set kwh per mile and decreases the EV range by the % of kwh used regardless of miles traveled. It does correct the EV miles per kwh for AC use because I see the remaining miles change instantly by about 10% with the AC selected.
 

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I doubt it's quite that simple because if I continued climbing that steep an incline, the car wouldn't do anywhere near 23 miles. I suspect that it uses some set kwh per mile and decreases the EV range by the % of kwh used regardless of miles traveled. It does correct the EV miles per kwh for AC use because I see the remaining miles change instantly by about 10% with the AC selected.
Well I expect the most recent interval is more than a minute/mile and less than 60min/60mi.

how long is your step incline?
 
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