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Discussion Starter #1
I am curious if anyone who has a Niro PHEV has decided to buy a spare and tire change kit and how they store it?
 

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I am curious if anyone who has a Niro PHEV has decided to buy a spare and tire change kit and how they store it?
I decided not to because there's no way to store it without losing cargo space plus having to deal with securing it. I do have the "Tire Mobility Kit" though so no worries right? >:)
 

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I decided not to because there's no way to store it without losing cargo space plus having to deal with securing it. I do have the "Tire Mobility Kit" though so no worries right? >:)
And roadside assistance :D
In all honesty, those things are good enough for 99% of drivers and driving situations. The only time I'd consider carrying a spare is if I was going to be driving offroad and far from cell service. Not worth the added weight and losing the cargo space otherwise.

When I start going camping a bunch this summer, I'm considering buying a rooftop cargo rack and putting a spare up there - I'd be mostly off-highway so the MPG consequence is insignificant. No loss in interior cargo space, and easy to strap down. Then I'd just store it in the garage when I get back home.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you guys. We just got a 2019 Phev Niro and I was interested in what more experienced owners were doing.
 

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And roadside assistance :D
In all honesty, those things are good enough for 99% of drivers and driving situations. The only time I'd consider carrying a spare is if I was going to be driving offroad and far from cell service. Not worth the added weight and losing the cargo space otherwise.
That's actually an interesting idea. The vast majority of my driving is commuting and I'm ok with a little inconvenience if I blow a tire on the way to or from work. It would be significantly less OK if my wife and I were stranded on the interstate in the middle of nowhere waiting for AAA to find us. It might be worth putting together a "travel kit" that included a spare tire and related tools. You could probably come up with a storage solution such as a moderately large pelican case that would hold the whole thing and make it easy to get in and out of the car. I might want to price that out and see what it would cost to put something like that together.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Your thoughts are similar to mine. I am fine on our local commute without a spare. If my wife, child or the family were traveling I feel better with a spare available. We camp and hike in some remote areas and I 'm not sure Roadside assistance is available in some of these areas.
 

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You don't want a roof rack unless you are willing to take a 5 mpg plus hit on efficiency. A better option would be a tow hitch and accessory to carry the tire, preferably swing out or down so you could access the hatch. Of course, you would have a great story if you had to hike ten miles out from your campsite for cell coverage to call for service!
 

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I was uncomfortable with the PHEV's absence of a spare tire, until I thought back on how long it had been since I had a flat that required a tire change (rather than just pumping some air into the tire). That brought back a memory of a time more than 25 years ago when I was poor and driving on tires that were on borrowed time. There was one very hot day when I made the naive choice to drive down a paved road that was in poor condition. The combination of heat and rough surface caught up with me quickly. I got a flat about two miles down that road. Got out, changed the tire, and 20 minutes later was merrily on my way, with about six more miles to go before my anticipated turn on to a better road. Unfortunately, I only manged about three of those six miles before I had my second flat, and I was out of spare tires at that point. No cell phone in those days, had to walk to someone's house, persuade them to let me use their phone, and call family for help.


One of the lessons learned from that day was to replace my tires well before they are worn far enough that they can easily blow out. And now that I can afford to live by that rule, I do. Another lesson was that having one spare tire isn't necessarily enough, depending on the conditions you find yourself in, but that lesson wasn't persuasive enough for me to begin carrying two spare tires at all times. Instead, I just concluded to avoid getting into a situation where my tires were in questionable condition.



Somewhere in the interim, I visited the Guadalupe mountains in West Texas. It was a very rural location, but my employer had an operation there. One of the first things I recognized on that trip was that there was one tire company within 100 miles of my employer's operation, and they absolutely adored my employer because we were paying them to replace two or three damaged large truck tires every day. That site (largely off-road) was **** on tires.


So yeah - the Niro seems to be especially popular with folks who like to visit back country areas, and anyone visiting those kinds of locations would do well to bring a spare if they can (and also a jack, and tire iron). 99% of the time, you won't need it, but it's a real drag to walk 25 miles to get a cell signal to call a tow truck, and the probability of that happening increases when you visit certain kinds of remote areas (like West Texas).



Unfortunately, the Niro's rear hatch opens up, rather than to the side. My wife's 99 CRV had a rear door that opened to the side, and that made it possible for Honda to mount the spare tire outside the car, Jeep style. It probably would detract from fuel economy if we did something like that with a Niro, but it would be nice to have the option.
 

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Ok, a little research produces the fact that that the spare tire for the Niro is a T125/80 R16. Plugging that into tiresize.com's calculator gives me a 24" diameter and 5" width for the mounted tire. 5" is narrow enough to just sit it on the floor behind the front seats even with the rear seats folded. The jack and tool kit fits into the rim so that's handy.

A simple tire caddy like this:

https://www.amazon.com/FLR-Adjustable-Waterproof-Protection-Seasonal/dp/B07L2VKTW2/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?keywords=tire+bag&qid=1557402963&s=gateway&sr=8-2-spons&psc=1

Should hold the whole thing and let me just stash it in the car when I need it.
 

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I decided not to because there's no way to store it without losing cargo space plus having to deal with securing it. I do have the "Tire Mobility Kit" though so no worries right? >:)
I had to use a Tire Mobility Kit with my '14 Forte5. The setup was easy but when I went to turn it on everything leaked out of the hose right before the metal fastener that screws on to the tire valve stem. The canister contents ended up all over me, the car, the road. None made it to the valve stem, let alone the tire. That crap sticks like crazy.
 

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I had to use a Tire Mobility Kit with my '14 Forte5. The setup was easy but when I went to turn it on everything leaked out of the hose right before the metal fastener that screws on to the tire valve stem. The canister contents ended up all over me, the car, the road. None made it to the valve stem, let alone the tire. That crap sticks like crazy.
Oh yeah, Fix-A-Flat is nasty stuff. Plus if you use it the tire is toast, maybe the wheel too and the valve stem will be glued shut making it impossible to safely deflate the tire before removing it from the rim. Finally, the guy at the tire shop will want to murder you and your family for making him deal with the disgusting mess. :D

Probably better to just call for roadside assistance.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
jmurphEV the idea of that tire coved with everything in one place is really a nice package. I might investigation that, now if we can think of a good way to secure it so if heaven forbid we have a rollover it doesn't become a projectile in the vehicle we'll be set.
 

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I had a flat on the road and used the repair kit. I lasted a short time, but I was able to limp back home by airing up every 15-20 minutes. I bought a spare tire kit on EBay and carry the tire when I travel. The jack parts stow under the rear cargo area. The flat happened late at night and it would have taken hours for roadside assistance to arrive.
 

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I am curious if anyone who has a Niro PHEV has decided to buy a spare and tire change kit and how they store it?

You cant, they cant and nobody cant!... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Your correct, I am well aware the spare tire compartment is filled with the battery. My question was directed to individuals who have decided they needed/wanted a spare - what they went with and if or how they secured it in the vehicle. Some have already mentioned temporarily carrying it on the luggage rails on top the car - one fellow even mentioned a hitch and accessory to carry it outside the vehicle. Another inventive PHEV Niro owner was nice enough to post a tire package kit with cover that included the tire and jack etc. I bet someone somewhere has thought of a good way to fasten the tire down inside the vehicle without modifications to the interior vehicle.
 

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Some have already mentioned temporarily carrying it on the luggage rails on top the car.
That could be cool t have a "Crocodile Dundee" version of the Niro!;)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you all for your input and personal experiences. I knew in the back of my mind I felt I needed a back up plan for a flat other than the mobility kit. Your experiences confirmed what I was thinking. I bought a pre owned 2019 Kia Niro Spare Tire Kit on Ebay for $175. This include spare mounted on the Niro rim with all the tools in the styrofoam holer. I think I will also buy a tire plug repair kit and put in the glove box. Using the mobility kit will only be a last resort.
 

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If you only use your Niro with the back seats down, you should be able to rig your spare tire flat against the right passenger door. That will maximize your load area for other purposes, perhaps such as sleeping in the back.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
One thing I will be interested in when the spare arrives is looking at the spare tire storage area under the battery very closely. I am aware the extra capacity Plug In Hybid battery sits on top of the place where the Hybid only spare is stored and partially covers the area. If the battery sets flat above the storage place I wonder is there is a way to possibly slide the spare into this space under the battery. Probably not and there may be safety and performance reasons that this would be a fools folly. The idea does interest me though.
 
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