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I own a 2018 Niro Touring hybrid. Yesterday I was in an accident and am concerned that my car will be totalled. I really like my Niro, but was thinking if I have to get a new one, I might get the plug-in hybrid since my drive to work is within the range of all electric. I'd be interested in hearing from the owners of the plug-in hybrid if they like it.
 

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I have a PHEV. I'm glad I got it, it makes the regular HEV seem like a gas guzzler. I typically get 60+ km's instead of the rated 42 km's. My daily commute is 44 km's. But I'll probably have to start using the ICE soon to defrost the windows (I don't park my car in the garage until December when the toys get put away for the winter). So far it's been just above freezing.


After getting the PHEV, I think I'd prefer the BEV. But I still don't know if it has enough range for my typical usage. That and it's a lot more expensive than the PHEV. At least with the PHEV you should recoup your initial upfront extra cost and some.
 

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I am overall satisfied with the PHEV, but if I did it over again I'd like to get the BEV model. The PHEV electric motor is sufficient for most driving conditions, but when there's hills to climb or uphill freeway on-ramps I find myself wishing for a bit more power to stay out of the ICE starting. I've had one tank of gas that measured out at 350 MPG, and I really like that. I've been able to get 35 miles with the HVAC on without the ICE kicking in, and driving pure EV is really spoiling me. :)

This is no dig on the PHEV. It's one of the best plug-ins available. I still have two and a half years left on my lease, and I am happy with the choice I made. But pure EV is really nice.
 

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PHEV all the way for me. I've had mine for 18 months and almost 29000 miles. When I bought it my commute was 40 miles each way but even then the EV mileage made it worth while. Now, my commute is 7 miles and I'm almost all EV during the week. Would a BEV be better? Maybe during the week, but for long trips? Not ideal. This weekend we drove from DC to Pittsburgh and back in the Niro. That's just outside the BEV's range so we would have had to charge up somewhere along the way. In the PHEV we still averaged 45mpg on the trip back starting with 0 miles of battery range. That's while blasting through the mountains of western PA and MD at 80+ mph. Not bad. >:)

For me, the PHEV is the best of both worlds. It's a pure electric during the week and around town and an efficient hybrid on long road trips. Total win. :D
 

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Love my PHEV ex premium. I've had it since Feb and have almost 8K miles. My normal use is electric only, but I have to drive a 1000 mile round trip every 2 months so it's adding up. So glad I have the ability to do the long trips on gas and use electric at home.
 

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I've owned my PHEV for a year now, and if I had it to do over again, I would buy it again. My only regret is that Kia doesn't offer as many exterior color choices for the PHEV compared to the HEV.

One thing any prospective PHEV owner needs to think about is: "where will I plug it in and what sort of charger will I use?" If you're not able to plug it in and charge it when the battery is low, then buy the HEV instead: there's a disadvantage in lugging around all the extra battery weight if you're not able to regularly charge it.

The PHEV comes with a Level 1 (120 V) charger. There's been some controversy over whether it's OK to use that charger all of the time, or whether you need to pay a significant amount of money to install a Level 2 (240 V) charger in your home, and also hire an electrician to wire it. I think many of us have concluded that there's nothing wrong with using the Level 1 charger all of the time, but even if you do that, it seems to be generally acknowledged that you should have a dedicated circuit to plug the charger into, meaning that it's not competing with other appliances on the same circuit during the time you are charging it. So if you're purchasing the PHEV and you don't have really solid house wiring to plug it into that is not competing with other loads on the same circuit, you might want to budget for an electrician to install a dedicated outlet for charging.

In my case, I work from home and don't have a daily commute: I can go for weeks or months at a time without starting the ICE. I filled the tank after coming home from a long trip in January, and I didn't have to fill it again until July. It was getting to the point where I was starting to fret because gasoline can go bad over a period of time and six months is kind of a long period. I didn't have any problems with bad gas, but this is one extreme example of something that PHEV owners need to think about if their habits don't require them to refill the tank periodically.

There are no documented requirements in the owners manual to do what follows, but I would suggest that PHEV owners adopt the following practices when it's convenient:

  • If you live in a really hot climate (my garage temp exceeds 100 degrees F for several weeks each year), refrain from charging the battery to 100% during hot weather, unless you plan to use all of it the next day. I programmed my charger to only run between 3 AM and 6 AM, and I tend to only plug it in when the EV range is less than 12 miles, so it rarely charges to 100% during hot weather. I do this because everything I've read about modern battery technology indicates that the battery will degrade more quickly if it's charged to full capacity when it's exposed to high temperatures.
  • When I'm taking a long trip or planning on driving up mountain roads, I make a point of manually toggling the car into hybrid mode (with the push button next to the gearshift) before I've used up all of the electric range. If I don't do that, the car will automatically transition after it has used all of the electric range in the battery. But if I do that while there still is some electric range available, then the car has a bit more horsepower for climbing steep hills and a bit more battery reserve for driving in EV mode in stop and go traffic.
 

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I've owned my PHEV for a year now, and if I had it to do over again, I would buy it again. My only regret is that Kia doesn't offer as many exterior color choices for the PHEV compared to the HEV.

One thing any prospective PHEV owner needs to think about is: "where will I plug it in and what sort of charger will I use?" If you're not able to plug it in and charge it when the battery is low, then buy the HEV instead: there's a disadvantage in lugging around all the extra battery weight if you're not able to regularly charge it.

The PHEV comes with a Level 1 (120 V) charger. There's been some controversy over whether it's OK to use that charger all of the time, or whether you need to pay a significant amount of money to install a Level 2 (240 V) charger in your home, and also hire an electrician to wire it. I think many of us have concluded that there's nothing wrong with using the Level 1 charger all of the time, but even if you do that, it seems to be generally acknowledged that you should have a dedicated circuit to plug the charger into, meaning that it's not competing with other appliances on the same circuit during the time you are charging it. So if you're purchasing the PHEV and you don't have really solid house wiring to plug it into that is not competing with other loads on the same circuit, you might want to budget for an electrician to install a dedicated outlet for charging.

In my case, I work from home and don't have a daily commute: I can go for weeks or months at a time without starting the ICE. I filled the tank after coming home from a long trip in January, and I didn't have to fill it again until July. It was getting to the point where I was starting to fret because gasoline can go bad over a period of time and six months is kind of a long period. I didn't have any problems with bad gas, but this is one extreme example of something that PHEV owners need to think about if their habits don't require them to refill the tank periodically.

There are no documented requirements in the owners manual to do what follows, but I would suggest that PHEV owners adopt the following practices when it's convenient:

  • If you live in a really hot climate (my garage temp exceeds 100 degrees F for several weeks each year), refrain from charging the battery to 100% during hot weather, unless you plan to use all of it the next day. I programmed my charger to only run between 3 AM and 6 AM, and I tend to only plug it in when the EV range is less than 12 miles, so it rarely charges to 100% during hot weather. I do this because everything I've read about modern battery technology indicates that the battery will degrade more quickly if it's charged to full capacity when it's exposed to high temperatures.
  • When I'm taking a long trip or planning on driving up mountain roads, I make a point of manually toggling the car into hybrid mode (with the push button next to the gearshift) before I've used up all of the electric range. If I don't do that, the car will automatically transition after it has used all of the electric range in the battery. But if I do that while there still is some electric range available, then the car has a bit more horsepower for climbing steep hills and a bit more battery reserve for driving in EV mode in stop and go traffic.
All good comments. I will add that I can't envision any reason to not use the L1 charger regularly, other than the time it takes to charge. It is limited to 12 amps, so it is far too low on power to cause excessive heating of the battery during charging.

A 220v EVSE doesn't have to cost a lot, but paying an electrician certainly adds to the total amount. And unless you really know what you're doing, adding a 220v circuit isn't a do-it-yourself project. In addition, legally it requires a permit to add a new circuit. But I paid will under $200 for my 220v 16 amp EVSE. Of course, if you want to plan for a future EV, then a more powerful (and expensive) EVSE might make sense.

On restricting the charge level, unfortunately there's no way to automatically limit the amount of charge in the PHEV. I've checked every possible menu and cannot find a way to set an upper limit. Plus, there's an unknown if Kia is already limiting the usable power of the battery. It's possible that 100% on the display isn't really a fully charged battery. We just don't know. Overall, it's just not something I'm going to worry about.

I too will manually switch to/from hybrid mode to save EV power for better use. If I have a long freeway trip, I save the battery for the low speed driving at the destination. Running in EV mode is more valuable (in my opinion) at slower speed, in-town driving.
 

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I don't like PHEV's... I love them!

I love PHEV's. 95% of the time, it's an electric car. 5% of the time, it's a really good hybrid with no range anxiety. It's really nice not having to go to a gas station very often.

The only time I would buy a pure hybrid these days is if my daily commute were more than twice the electric range.

The only time I would buy an pure EV would be if I drove beyond the PHEV's range more than 50% of the time AND I had another car for longer trips.

Bottom line, though, is do what makes YOU happy.
 

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I love PHEV's. 95% of the time, it's an electric car. 5% of the time, it's a really good hybrid with no range anxiety. It's really nice not having to go to a gas station very often.

The only time I would buy a pure hybrid these days is if my daily commute were more than twice the electric range.

The only time I would buy an pure EV would be if I drove beyond the PHEV's range more than 50% of the time AND I had another car for longer trips.

Bottom line, though, is do what makes YOU happy.
Well, let's be honest. The PHEV has far less power in EV mode than the BEV Niro. You can't press the accelerator much more than about 2/3 the way before the ICE will start to give you extra power. With the small size of our battery, a more powerful EV motor would wreak havoc on our range, but it would be a lot more fun. Yes, I drive mine as an EV about 70% of the time, but it's a limited power EV, and can't compare to any existing BEV on the market today. But then it's also about $10,000 less expensive for the same trim level.

If I could get a PHEV Niro with at least a 25 kW battery and a heat pump (so the ICE isn't needed for cabin heat unless it's really cold), that would be (in my world) about the perfect PHEV. The problem is once you've added the cost of a larger battery and the heat pump, you've virtually reached the cost of the BEV version, which doesn't have the expense of the ICE and its related equipment. So when my lease is up, the odds are very high I'll be moving to a BEV. Maybe the Niro, maybe the VW ID.4. Have to see what the market looks like by then.
 

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I love my EX Premium PHEV. I have put 9500 miles on it in about 5 months. I drive it to EV car shows all over East TN and Western NC. I regularly get 30+ miles of EV range (EPA is 26) and on gas, I rarely see my average dip below 60mpg (EPA is 46 combined).

Now if money wasn't an object, I'd get the Niro EV. 240 mile EPA rated range (it probably beats it), virtually no maintenance, and much quicker than its PHEV/HEV siblings. I just couldn't swing it in my budget (the EV lease was going to be about $225 more per month than the PHEV). When my PHEV lease is up in two and a half years, I'm most likely going full electric. I'll probably try to find a used Kona EV or Niro EV.
 

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When my PHEV lease is up in two and a half years, I'm most likely going full electric. I'll probably try to find a used Kona EV or Niro EV.
Same here, except I'll have the VW ID.4 on my radar as well. My next car purchase may likely be last (at least for some time), as I'll most likely be retired by then, so I'll want something new, not used.
 

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Not going to lie, I’m intrigued by that I.D. Buzz concept. Apparently it is going into production. That would be cool if the price isn’t crazy.
Can't recall which was the Buzz. That was the EV bus, right? Yes, it will be put into production for North America. I'm not certain if they will build it in Tennessee, or import it from Europe. The ID.4 (the concept was call the Crozz) will start out being built in Europe and imported to NA, but Tennessee production should start in late 2021 or early 2022. Since my Niro lease is up in May 2022, the timing should be good.

That said, I'm not discounting possibly moving to the E-Niro. If they can boost the range a bit, say up to around 275 miles, the Niro EV will be a strong contender for me. But the ID.4 should have a 300+ mile battery available, and when I retire I'll be moving about 120 miles away from the grandkids. I'd like to have the range to make a round trip across the mountains, but have to see what that will cost. :D
 

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I’ve got a 2018 LX model HEV and I do love it. I’ve gotten 7 miles all electric out of it, but my commute is 30 miles to work and back home in the morning, and the same in the afternoon. When I bought my Niro, they did not have any PHEV in stock. They also gave me a great deal on mine due to it being the last 2018 model on the lot.

I would love to have a PHEV, but right now my monthly fuel costs are only about $65. So I don’t think I could get a PHEV for $65 more a month than what I am paying now($350). Unless we are going to be gone for a week or longer when we take an out of town trip, we always take my Niro. As of right now, I have owned it for 10 months and have 23,000 miles on it.

Oh, it is also really nice having a spare tire, which I have had to use.
 

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Having a 35 mile each way commute with no charger at work, this makes me feel a little better that I went with the HEV.
When I bought my PHEV my commute was 80 miles round trip. I only charged at home but that still meant that 30% of my commute was at ~2/3 the cost of gas. With the tax breaks the PHEV wasn't that much more expensive plus I really wanted the EX Premium features so it still made sense to me.
 

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Having a 35 mile each way commute with no charger at work, this makes me feel a little better that I went with the HEV.
Well, you'd still get some amazing MPG on the entire trip with a PHEV. Use it in EV mode for the slower, non-freeway sections, and switch to hybrid mode for the freeway. My work is 30 miles round trip, with no charger available. Even if I stay in hybrid mode the entire way, I still see over 60 MPG, and by using EV mode where it's the most benefit (slower and/or stop and go) the same trip is closer to 150 MPG.

As mentioned, if you live in the US the federal tax credit brings the PHEV down to almost the same price as the HEV. Lease like I did and the tax credit comes right off the price of the car, rather than waiting to file your taxes at year end. Plus, if you don't have a high enough tax liability to claim the entire tax, leasing gives you the full amount. For that Niro PHEV, that credit is $4,543.
 
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