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I think the EPA spec is for how far you can drive based on ordinary speeds and probably flat roads and no wind and temperate climate. Real world results go both ways, if they always exceeded EPA, then the testing algorithm would be incorrect.

Regen can never recapture anything but a small portion of slowing and downhill energy so I doubt it is taken into account. Obviously in the real world, hybrids do better than ICE only cars but that is a total design being better than the pieces. I'll remind you that certain ICE only cars got better mpg than the original Prius, in fact I've owned two of them: Datsun B210 +, and the Honda CRX HF. Both of those were rated over 50 mpg, and when I was willing to drive them 55 mph, they exceeded that (I think both weighed under 2,000 pounds).

But recovering even a small amount (I think the number is between 10 and 15% of lost energy) is of course worthwhile as long as cost and weight are not excessive. As they are not today.
The big benefit of a hybrid to me over those old econo cars of the past ( i had a couple) is the driving on surface streets and on secondary highways. The difference in mpg is night and day. It's a little less of a difference if you're always driving on freeways. Also I can't really compare our niro to my old datsun 710 or mazda 323.
 

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The Niro is a far better car than those of 20 years ago, or in the case of the cars I mentioned 30 to 45 years ago. The biggest gain for me is how quiet it is relative to any prior car owned.
 

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The big benefit of a hybrid to me over those old econo cars of the past ( i had a couple) is the driving on surface streets and on secondary highways. The difference in mpg is night and day. It's a little less of a difference if you're always driving on freeways. Also I can't really compare our niro to my old datsun 710 or mazda 323.
Those old cars had none of the safety devices that new cars have, which is one reason cars both cost and weigh more. We have a dozen or more air bags, vastly superior crumple zones, more efficient A/C, better radios, more comfortable seats, and I could go on and on. I have wonderful memories of many or my early cars back in the '70s. But I also recognize that they would be absolutely miserable to drive today in comparison. My first car in 1970 was a 1963 Impala SS, no power steering or brakes, no A/C, drum brakes, just a Corvette 327 and a Borg Warner T-10 4 speed transmission. Great memories, beautiful car, but man that would be an absolute tank now. :D
 

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No, for the PHEV there are only two choices: Level 1 and Level 2 AC. Level 1 is 110/120v, using a typical outlet in a North American home. This is no more than 12 amps with the factory EVSE. Level 2 uses 220/240v AC. In the Niro PHEV, the on-board charger is a 3.6 kW unit, which is 16 amps. Because the voltage is doubled and the current is higher, it will charge more than twice the speed of the Level 1 charger. You can use higher powered EVSEs, such as the 40 amp JuiceBox I have, but it doesn't charge any faster. It's limited by the capability of the on-board charger.

The third level of charging is DC Fast Charging (DCFC). This is not supported by the Niro PHEV, but is is available with the Niro EV. As you can tell from the name, it uses DC rather than AC, and the actual charger is outboard of the car. It charges at a much higher voltage and current level than Level 1 or Level 2 charging, but the only PHEV I am aware of that supports it is the Mitsubishi Outlander. For most PHEVs, the battery simply isn't large enough to justify adding DCFC capability.
So... what does this mean for charging the Niro on the road? I understand it probably doesn't make much sense, given that you could always get gas much easier, but theoretically? Are there charging stations where you could get AC charging? Or are they all DC only?
 

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So... what does this mean for charging the Niro on the road? I understand it probably doesn't make much sense, given that you could always get gas much easier, but theoretically? Are there charging stations where you could get AC charging? Or are they all DC only?
Most of the chargers I've seen at rest stops on the highway are not compatible with the Niro. I'm sure there are some, but it's not common, at least not here on the east coast of the USA.

Having said that, there are plenty of charging stations that the PHEV can use, mostly in cities rather than on the highway. As you note, that kind of makes sense as there's no real reason to bother charging a plug-in in the middle of a road trip. I try to plug in if I'm out running errands and there is a free charger nearby. In the Washington DC area lots of public garages have chargers as do some businesses like Costco.
 

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So... what does this mean for charging the Niro on the road? I understand it probably doesn't make much sense, given that you could always get gas much easier, but theoretically? Are there charging stations where you could get AC charging? Or are they all DC only?
Both kinds are available at public chargers. There will be some that are DCFC only, and some that are Level 2 only. But most will have both available. An app on your phone for Plug Share is a good way to locate them.
 
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