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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I know I’m probably crazy just asking this question. I have ‘22 Niro HEV and love it! It is the Touring model so has so many toys and tools that make driving so easy. I have figured out how to use the regeneration to the max so I’m averaging 52 MPG according to the car computer, about 49 when I do the simple math of dividing miles by gallons for my actual MPG. Still impressive! I do reset the tank statistics every time I fill up so I get an accurate comparison.

My question surrounds how often it kicks in the gas motor. I have noticed my battery level can be well above half and the gas motor will still kick in when it doesn’t need to. I know when I need power it should kick in but there are times I don’t need power and should be able to run on just the batteries.

Thus my question. Is there a way to change the thresholds of when the gas motor kicks on and off so I can save even more fuel? I’m assuming the answer is no but can’t hurt to ask.

Second question not related, why does the car’s computer ALWAYS indicated better MPG than calculated? This isn’t just a Kia thing, my two Fords before this car did the same thing.
 

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I think the second question is the marketing dept. has a lot to do with that. First question is I think it would be a mistake to monkey with the computer, instead learn how to get around it's limits a little. Like when you think it should be running on the battery alone I agree it seems hyper sensitive to the pressure on the accelerator. Instead just accelerate a few mph. above the speed you want and then let off just enough to let the battery alone cut in you'll loose those few extra mph but then just keep enough pressure on the accelerator to keep you speed and it should stay in the ev mode for quite awhile. Things like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have done that but more times than not, it keeps the engine running far longer than it should. It probably is a mistake to mess with the computer but I had to ask. I'm a software developer so that's where my brain goes.
 

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Is the battery already low when you try that? If the road is flat I can usually keep the car in EV for a few miles before the battery gets low and makes the ICE cut in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The battery is over half full. I'm not concerned about the engine running when it is low but at half full, it shouldn't need to kick in the engine unless I'm climbing a hill.
 

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Hybrid models aren't designed for or expected to run extensively on EV power. For that you need the PHEV. The computer is programmed to maintain the battery charge level within certain parameters, only going really low or high under unusual conditions, usually related to climbing or descending long hills. The EV motor has less power than the PHEV or the EV. In my son-in-law's Ioniq HEV (identical powertrain to the Niro HEV) I cannot keep the engine off unless the ground is level or downhill and I accelerate very, very gently.
 
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I've programmed ECUs on subarus but never seen the software or interface for a Niro. The ecu's may be locked with a code or special programmer key only available to dealers. Also the hybrid system is likely so complicated and because it's not a performance vehicle aftermarket just won't bother investing in tuning software/hardware. The HEV isn't really made to drive in EV only mode anyway, I think the motor is 40HP or less and only a 200V system. And there is no way to charge the battery back up besides regen braking or running the gas motor if it was ran empty driving in EV. The PHEV is made to drive in EV mode, it uses I think a 330V battery and 60HP EV motor and it can be plugged in to recharge the battery after driving in EV.
 

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Hello,

I know I’m probably crazy just asking this question. I have ‘22 Niro HEV and love it! It is the Touring model so has so many toys and tools that make driving so easy. I have figured out how to use the regeneration to the max so I’m averaging 52 MPG according to the car computer, about 49 when I do the simple math of dividing miles by gallons for my actual MPG. Still impressive! I do reset the tank statistics every time I fill up so I get an accurate comparison.

My question surrounds how often it kicks in the gas motor. I have noticed my battery level can be well above half and the gas motor will still kick in when it doesn’t need to. I know when I need power it should kick in but there are times I don’t need power and should be able to run on just the batteries.

Thus my question. Is there a way to change the thresholds of when the gas motor kicks on and off so I can save even more fuel? I’m assuming the answer is no but can’t hurt to ask.

Second question not related, why does the car’s computer ALWAYS indicated better MPG than calculated? This isn’t just a Kia thing, my two Fords before this car did the same thing.
I have a 2022 Kia Niro Touring too and I love it! Re question 1: you must be a true car person. I've noted that my hybrid will also occasionally kick in the gas when the battery level is high, but frankly- there so much I don't understand and am learning about hybrids that as long as my car is doing well and problem free - I've decided to focus on more pressing issues. Re: question 2, I track my own mileage, gallons at fillup, and every other little item I could think of including outside temperature in a little I keep in the side pocket to get a true picture of my MPG over time. I think my spreadsheet is well-worth the time.
 

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I track my own mileage, gallons at fillup, and every other little item I could think of including outside temperature in a little I keep in the side pocket to get a true picture of my MPG over time. I think my spreadsheet is well-worth the time.
Fuelly.com offers a great phone app for tracking MPG. You can enter a lot of details, such as fuel brand, octane, take a picture of the receipt and save it, tire pressure, and then a generic Notes area to write whatever you want. And the web site has an CSV export option to play with charts to your heart's content.
 
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