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Does anyone know if it’s possible to change the steering response to sport mode without engaging the sport drive mode? I would like to use it permanently with the regular eco drive mode.
 

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Engine fuel mapping, takes it out of Atkinson cycle so it's not as efficient, transmission mapping, and with the PHEV forces the engine to run almost all the time. But I've never noticed any difference in steering or handling.
 

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Engine fuel mapping, takes it out of Atkinson cycle so it's not as efficient, transmission mapping,
What? I don't think it does any of that. Mostly it remaps the accelerator response. Transmission responds according to accelerator position.
 

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Let me rephrase that. Switching out of Atkinson is something I read, but can't find again. I said fuel mapping but I did mean throttle mapping/response. Since Sport mode puts the transmission into manual shift mode, I think that's fair to say it's been remapped. :D
 

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It would be a piece of cake to change the steering feel via adjusting the electric power steering, but I cannot feel any difference either. But I do think the standard calibration is good for a variety of driving situations. The Niro will never be a sports car no matter the marketing. Sport mode indeed!
 

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Let me rephrase that. Switching out of Atkinson is something I read, but can't find again. I said fuel mapping but I did mean throttle mapping/response. Since Sport mode puts the transmission into manual shift mode, I think that's fair to say it's been remapped. :D
There is no way to switch in and out of Atchison cycle in this engine. I believe Hyundai /now's newest engine can do this with a new very complicated cam control.
 

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There is no way to switch in and out of Atchison cycle in this engine. I believe Hyundai /now's newest engine can do this with a new very complicated cam control.

Variable valve duration is not necessarily less complicated than variable timing or lift, but VCCD is an elegant solution. It works, as best as we can tell from patent drawings and Hyundai’s promotional video, with a rotating adjuster with a slot in the middle. The variable duration adjuster moves up and down, and shifts the contact point of the cam lobe. Where the duration adjuster is moved determines how long a valve is open.
The benefit is that you can have a long valve duration during low engine speeds and loads, allowing plenty of time for the air to enter the cylinder. At higher speeds, a short duration maximizes compression and thus power. Speaking of compression, VCCD can also be used to change the effective compression ratio, similar to how variable-valve-timing systems can close the intake valve late and effectively switch between Atkinson-cycle and Otto-cycle operation.
 

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Well...that's new. Wonder what it actually does to the steering? It does nothing noticeable on the '17 model in USA.
Checked it out yesterday on a winding, narrow road here in Ireland. It seems that the steering is slightly heavier in sport mode, in other words less steering assistance giving more "feel".
 

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I have a 2019 PHEV and the “heavier” steering in sport mode is very noticeable.

Other than that, because it tends to keep the engine running while stopped, it definitely feels much quicker when starting without the delay in eco mode before it decides to kick the engine it. Useful for merging onto busy streets from a side street.
 

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I have a 2019 PHEV and the “heavier” steering in sport mode is very noticeable.

Other than that, because it tends to keep the engine running while stopped, it definitely feels much quicker when starting without the delay in eco mode before it decides to kick the engine it. Useful for merging onto busy streets from a side street.
Mine still shuts off the engine if I come to a stop in Sport mode. It will shut off even as I'm slowing for the stop, similar to hybrid mode. If yours is staying on, it might be because after a cold start the engine will run for a minimum amount of time to circulate fluids and get a minimum of heat added to the engine. It's not good to start an ICE and shut it back off quickly. But if you've been driving for at least a couple of minutes in Sport mode, that should be enough to let the ICE power back off when you stop.
 

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Mine still shuts off the engine if I come to a stop in Sport mode. It will shut off even as I'm slowing for the stop, similar to hybrid mode. If yours is staying on, it might be because after a cold start the engine will run for a minimum amount of time to circulate fluids and get a minimum of heat added to the engine. It's not good to start an ICE and shut it back off quickly. But if you've been driving for at least a couple of minutes in Sport mode, that should be enough to let the ICE power back off when you stop.
Yeah that’s probably it. The merges I use this technique on are always near the beginning of a drive, where it’s been running fully electric until then.
 

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Mine still shuts off the engine if I come to a stop in Sport mode.
When I did my little experiment to run my tank dry so I could learn the true tank capacity (turns out to be 12.6 gallons topped off), I ran for while in Sport mode in my HEV. It charged the battery a bit higher, then didn't run the engine any more than usual that I could notice. Speed below 50 mph as I was basically circling gas stations.
 
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