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Hello,

I really like the Sportmatic transmission when I need more control over the power. It would be nice to see the RPMs with a tach. Has anyone found one and set it up?
 

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Hate to keep bringing this up, but...

Get an Ultragauge. One simple plug and youve got all the information you could ever want.

At 62 mph, on a fairly level road, mine turns 2050 rpm. Just about the sweet spot for the ICE.
 

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Griswald. I took a look at the Ultragauge and wondering what the: Brake Horsepower & Brake Kilowatts sensor information gives. I have the ScanGauge2 and really don't think much to it really. Trying to figure out what the sensor combinations are is frustrating. I was looking to try and get a sensor that tells me not only the engine RPM, but wanting to know how much charge you get from the regenerative breaking.



Also, the cable that comes with the Scangauge doesn't allow you to install it on the OBDII port and still fit the front plastic cover back onto the dash. I am wondering if the Ultragauge plug is thin enough to do this? I am driving a standard HEV Kia Niro EX, not a plugin so I don't know if the panels are different between the models.
 

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Griswald. I took a look at the Ultragauge and wondering what the: Brake Horsepower & Brake Kilowatts sensor information gives. I have the ScanGauge2 and really don't think much to it really. Trying to figure out what the sensor combinations are is frustrating. I was looking to try and get a sensor that tells me not only the engine RPM, but wanting to know how much charge you get from the regenerative breaking.



Also, the cable that comes with the Scangauge doesn't allow you to install it on the OBDII port and still fit the front plastic cover back onto the dash. I am wondering if the Ultragauge plug is thin enough to do this? I am driving a standard HEV Kia Niro EX, not a plugin so I don't know if the panels are different between the models.

I do not know what the internal programming does. I assume that the calculations for torque deal with speed, fuel flow, time and displacement. The HP number is all that plus RPM.

No, you cannot plug in and close the cover. I cut a small slot on my cover and really cannot even see it because of where it is in the car.

You will not get regenerative breaking info unless that is sn OBD2 protocol, I doubt that it is.

I really only leave mine on the short trip screen so I can watch my MPGs in real time. Its an eye opener and a great way to "learn" how to drive a hybrid.
 

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There almost certainly will be a PID for charging voltage in the BMS, perhaps one that specifically shows the regen. OBD2 has expanded tremendously since its introduction. There are many standard PIDs for EVs, and even PIDs specific to a manufacturer. There are lots of PIDs online for the Kia Niro, Hyundai Ioniq (exact same ones) for HEV and BEV variants. Should be the same for PHEVs.

There is a lot of good data available, but I haven't set up mine yet with some of the interesting hybrid related PIDs. I'll get around to it some day.
 

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There almost certainly will be a PID for charging voltage in the BMS, perhaps one that specifically shows the regen. OBD2 has expanded tremendously since its introduction. There are many standard PIDs for EVs, and even PIDs specific to a manufacturer. There are lots of PIDs online for the Kia Niro, Hyundai Ioniq (exact same ones) for HEV and BEV variants. Should be the same for PHEVs.

There is a lot of good data available, but I haven't set up mine yet with some of the interesting hybrid related PIDs. I'll get around to it some day.



My point was that while the information may be in some kind of PID format, I really doubt that a company like Ultragauge would be willing to assign one of their screens to it for the average consumer to view. Yes, that info might be available, but certainly not something that the average person really cares to know.


I remember back when I first got my Fusion Hybrid and a group of programmers were messing around with the Torque Pro app to get displays for the model-specific PID's. Very few of them were even available as a display and most were in a format that required tons of coding to even be readable other than a random-looking number. Most people jsut gave up and didn't bother with the PID's.


Heck, if all you want is charging info, hook up a donut CT and a multi-meter. You should be able to figure out voltage, amps, watts etc. from that.
 

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The reason for wanting that information is the Niro is a hybrid. All hybrid cars have regenerative breaking and power generation from the ICE. Us propeller heads that look towards trying to get the most economy out of our vehicles would want to get the most power out of these regenerative methods as we get free distance so to speak from running in EV mode vs if we were just running on an ICE alone. For example, when you are driving and you take your foot totally off the accelerator, the dial on your dash flicks down to regeneration. You'd want to know how much power is actually getting into that battery. I know from the Prius forums that with your feet off the accelerator but not on the break, just a small trickle of power is getting into the traction battery. But if you press a bit on the break, but not enough to really slow down the car, the small trickle jumps up to a pretty good flow of power. So a trick when driving is to look far enough ahead to what is happening and press lightly the brake pedal early when you see the traffic light coming up is red. Yes, you could wait and press the break much later but then you are using not only the regenerative motor to put power back into the battery but also the disc breaks that give you no power back at all. The difference can add up to a half MPG over a trip. Then you can also look into when the ICE is running and you are putting some of that power towards charging the battery and the other to drive you forward. Generally, that is accelerating, but if you knew the %each way you might decide that a little less acceleration might make quite a difference towards how much power is added back into your traction battery. Again, saving you some more MPG. To say that this information is not wanted to be known by anyone is nieve. Anyone who is a hypermiler and wants to get the most distance to each tank of gas, what is going on in the battery system is of great importance and interest.



The two tag values were from the Ultragauge web site, so they are already in their system. What I don't have is a really good description of what they do, nor an Ultragauge to try it out myself. I was hoping that someone who has the gauge and happens to be driving a Niro could give it a test to see what data it gives and see if that info correlates with what it sounds like the tags are named. This might be useful info.
 

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My point was that while the information may be in some kind of PID format, I really doubt that a company like Ultragauge would be willing to assign one of their screens to it for the average consumer to view. Yes, that info might be available, but certainly not something that the average person really cares to know.
Assign? That would only apply to the very limited wired version with a dedicated display. Otherwise, you can output unlimited gauges on a smartphone. Generally apps come pre-formatted with gauges the "average person" who buys an OBD reader will care about, but none come formatted with gauges aimed at hybrid/EV owners. Those super average users can format the gauges they want to see, and delete those they don't care about.
 

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The reason for wanting that information is the Niro is a hybrid. All hybrid cars have regenerative breaking and power generation from the ICE. Us propeller heads that look towards trying to get the most economy out of our vehicles would want to get the most power out of these regenerative methods as we get free distance so to speak from running in EV mode vs if we were just running on an ICE alone. For example, when you are driving and you take your foot totally off the accelerator, the dial on your dash flicks down to regeneration. You'd want to know how much power is actually getting into that battery. I know from the Prius forums that with your feet off the accelerator but not on the break, just a small trickle of power is getting into the traction battery. But if you press a bit on the break, but not enough to really slow down the car, the small trickle jumps up to a pretty good flow of power. So a trick when driving is to look far enough ahead to what is happening and press lightly the brake pedal early when you see the traffic light coming up is red. Yes, you could wait and press the break much later but then you are using not only the regenerative motor to put power back into the battery but also the disc breaks that give you no power back at all. The difference can add up to a half MPG over a trip. Then you can also look into when the ICE is running and you are putting some of that power towards charging the battery and the other to drive you forward. Generally, that is accelerating, but if you knew the %each way you might decide that a little less acceleration might make quite a difference towards how much power is added back into your traction battery. Again, saving you some more MPG. To say that this information is not wanted to be known by anyone is nieve. Anyone who is a hypermiler and wants to get the most distance to each tank of gas, what is going on in the battery system is of great importance and interest.



The two tag values were from the Ultragauge web site, so they are already in their system. What I don't have is a really good description of what they do, nor an Ultragauge to try it out myself. I was hoping that someone who has the gauge and happens to be driving a Niro could give it a test to see what data it gives and see if that info correlates with what it sounds like the tags are named. This might be useful info.

What values do you want me to look up? I have 2 blank screens I could use.
 

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From the UltraGauge web site. UltraGauge OBDII Supported Standardized Gauges. there are a whole slew of ones listed. I was curios if "Brake Horsepower 1 & 2" or "Brake Kilowatts 1 & 2" that were in that list of what is availible shows power going into the battery when you hit the brake. I guess out of curiosity there is:


Battery Voltage (Measured by ECM)
UltraGauge Battery Voltage (Measured by UG)
Load absolute %


All the other ones listed in the page look to be self expanitory. Thankyou very much for offering to give it a try.
 

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I set up a screen with HP and Torque at at the top and battery voltage and UG battery voltage on one lower screen and % Load Absolute on the other lower screen.



Took a short test drive, battery and UG battery voltage are the same, around 13.1 or so at idle or with the ICE off and around 14.50 when the ICE is pulling.


HP and Torque saw 140 and 170 when flooring it for a second or two. Both change based on throttle input, as you would expect.



% load is all over the place, doesnt seem to follow any real pattern, but was at 98.8% when I had it floored.


Most gauges drop to zero when in EV only mode, HP and Torque still display.


On my 30 mile highway commute home from work today, I will get some more data.
 

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I wondered if the Battery Voltage and UltraGauge Battery Voltage were linking to the internal battery that likely powers the ICE motor, and not have any connection to the traction battery. I am not sure if you were talking with the HP and Torque if that is for the Brake sensors. I get a feeling that the UltraGauge doens't really have any great sensor connections to Hybrid style cars. With EV's and Hybrids coming more and more into vogue, I think they will start to get sensors that will give more relivent data like what they do give for ICE vehicles.
 

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I agree, it is not tuned for hybrid PIDs. And since 99.87% of the cars on the street are not hybrids, I wouldn't expect a whole lot of tech support anyhow.


I really only bought it for the short trip mileage. It really teaches you how to drive a hybrid, even a standard gasoline vehicle, but especially a hybrid.
 
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