Kia Niro Forum banner

21 - 36 of 36 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
450 Posts
The interesting part about he Tweel is it reminds me of something I saw on YouTube about a guy who was fixing up a Rolls Royce and there were these special wheels on them that were Michelin PAX I believe. they were an airless tire, and the biggest problem with them was that when the tire was worn, there is virtually no way to get them off the rim short of trying to cut the whole wheel off. The tire came standard on only a few cars in North America and was quickly dropped. As no tire shop bought into the technology it left original owners high and dry when tires needed to be replaced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Next thing we are going to see here is a whole load of posts about how some oil change, or new air freshener install has ruined the MPG of their Niro. And after a whole lot of back and forth about it, it will come to light that they changed their tires and now are getting far worse fuel economy. I know that in a few years I will be changing mine and I also know that my fuel consumption will be directly effected. I am planning as I live up north to go towards a Nokian WR4 all weather tire as half of my year here is winter and I can't be bothered to change tires twice a year.
Working at a dealership and selling more Niros than any other salesman in my region, yes, I hear that crap. I had a customer convinced that rotating their tires ruined the mileage and made their car smell bad. We took it on our test loop and got well within the normal range for their year, trim, and equipment (49 combined for 17 EX), and they were still unconvinced. No smell at all, except the huge amount of weed they smoked in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Working at a dealership and selling more Niros than any other salesman in my region, yes, I hear that crap. I had a customer convinced that rotating their tires ruined the mileage and made their car smell bad. We took it on our test loop and got well within the normal range for their year, trim, and equipment (49 combined for 17 EX), and they were still unconvinced. No smell at all, except the huge amount of weed they smoked in it.
I can only imagine some of the stories and situations you guys must deal with at the dealerships. It would be fascinating to hear some of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,946 Posts
One thing about those "Tweel" tires is that they made no efficiency claims. For good reason! They will not do as well as any pneumatic tire (outside of knobby off-road tires) much less tires designed for efficiency.

Comfort claims are difficult for me to believe. For decades, airless tires have come out on a regular basis for bicycles, and everyone has been notably harder to pedal and are less comfortable.

The article talks about how quiet they are, due to tread design. That could be done just as easily to any pneumatic tire as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
You could also consider the Pirelli P7 Cinturato. It has an almost cult-like following in the Volt/Bolt community as a very good LRR tire. I bought them for my wife's Mazda CX-5 and we instantly saw a 2 mpg increase in efficiency. I think they are very quiet on the highway and smooth out the bumps well.

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Pirelli&tireModel=Cinturato+P7+All+Season+Plus&partnum=06HR6CP7ASPV2&vehicleSearch=true&fromCompare1=yes&autoMake=Kia&autoYear=2017&autoModel=Niro&autoModClar=FE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Pirelli P7 Cinturato appears to be a wonderful tire for those who live in dry areas. Not so much if you live where it rains frequently according to Tire Rack:
<<Pirelli Cinturato P7 All Season Plus (Grand Touring All-Season, 215/60R16 95V)
What We Liked: The most luxurious ride and sound quality of the test.
What We'd Improve: A big increase in wet grip is a must.
Conclusion: A refined option for when rain is not in the forecast.>>

If I ditch my Subie Outback for a Niro PHEV I'll shoe it with Michelin Crossclimate + for the climate here in the PNW
Michelin CrossClimate+ (Grand Touring All-Season, 225/50R17 98V)
What We Liked: Very strong wet performance and very capable on the track.
What We'd Improve: Noticeable tread growl, especially at low speeds. The ride was just a little firm for a touring tire.
Conclusion: Category-leading dry and wet traction in warm weather, and it's severe snow service-rated.

Also, according to Tire Rack user reviews & Consumer's Reports, it has very low rolling resistance and doesn't impact MPG too much. The OEM Michelins on the Niro is not a bad tire, just not the best overall except for LRR.

I'll gladly give up 1-2 mpg for a tire that will stop in 30 less feet at 50 mph on wet road!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
470 Posts
You could also consider the Pirelli P7 Cinturato. It has an almost cult-like following in the Volt/Bolt community as a very good LRR tire. I bought them for my wife's Mazda CX-5 and we instantly saw a 2 mpg increase in efficiency. I think they are very quiet on the highway and smooth out the bumps well.

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Pirelli&tireModel=Cinturato+P7+All+Season+Plus&partnum=06HR6CP7ASPV2&vehicleSearch=true&fromCompare1=yes&autoMake=Kia&autoYear=2017&autoModel=Niro&autoModClar=FE

Seem's like a good tire replacement!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Pirelli P7 Cinturato appears to be a wonderful tire for those who live in dry areas. Not so much if you live where it rains frequently according to Tire Rack:
<<Pirelli Cinturato P7 All Season Plus (Grand Touring All-Season, 215/60R16 95V)
What We Liked: The most luxurious ride and sound quality of the test.
What We'd Improve: A big increase in wet grip is a must.
Conclusion: A refined option for when rain is not in the forecast.>>
I wonder what type of car this reviewer installed it on?

We've put about 10,000 miles on the P7's we bought for my wife's CX-5. It's been a deluge of rain in East TN over the last month and a half. I haven't had any issues with wet traction. Note: Our CX-5 is FWD only, not AWD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
He Michael, we've missed you here on the Niro forum for the past few months. Still got your Niro PHEV? Did you ever swap your OEM tires for the TrueContact Touring tires. IF so, what was the result? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Hey all,


I've noticed that my Niro PHEV (one of the last model 2018s I believe) also 'suffers' from this. It depends a lot on the type of road but somehow it seems to be 'worse' than it was with my test-drive (which admittedly was a HEV). What I've noticed when removing the 'floor' from the trunk there is no insulation to be seen anywhere. Yes, there is some padding behind the plastic sidewalls but everything below the floor-level is bare metal.
I know this is anecdotal but almost 20 years ago I had a spil accident in my Citroen Xantia and the whole trunk floor was soaked with diesel. The only solution at the time was stripping out the 'fabric' that was glued to the metal walls. I drove around like that for a while so things could 'fume out' properly and yes, driving around was noticeably louder at the time. After a few weeks I installed new siding and it was quieter than ever before.



The material I used at the time were ordinary 'sound absorbing mats' I bought fairly cheap at a local DIY store. I doubt it was /better/ material than the original, it might have been a bit thicker but I remember I put a lot of effort in getting it to fit snugly all around. Took a while but it worked really well.



I'm considering doing the same thing with my Niro, but I'm a bit worried whether this might affect the thermal housekeeping of the 10kWhh battery that sits in the middle of all of this... =/ Anyone has any experience with this? Certainly will ask when I pass by the dealer for my first maintenance checkup.


Kr,
Roby
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,946 Posts
There is a dedicated fan for just the rear battery. But normal use could entail carrying a dozen sleeping bags or fiberglass insulation. So that is not a worry.

The PHEV fills the spare tire well so it should exhibit lower road noise transmission than the HEV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Bit of a side note, but it seems these topics are related (well, at least the first one, when flooring it like in the second topic I *expect* it to be loud tbh =)
* https://www.kianiroforum.com/forum/186-interior/6281-sound-proofing.html
* https://www.kianiroforum.com/forum/13-kia-niro-photos-videos/1058-cabin-noise.html

Also forgot to mention: I know the sticker in the door-frame advises 2.4 bar (240 kPa, ~35 psi) for both empty and fully loaded (!?!?) but as an experiment I've upped it a bit to 2.6 bar (260 kPa, ~38 psi) (the tire is indicated to handle as high as 3.2 bar (320 kPa, ~46 psi)). I'm under the impression it improved things slightly (**). Driving feels the same and I had to brake pretty hard the other day -- on a wet and newish piece of asphalt -- and the ABS didn't even kick in, so I guess it won't affect (stopping) grip all that much.



Fun fact, those 'realtime tire pressure meters' seem to actually work. Cold they would show 2.4 and then after a while go to 2.5 as I had driven around a bit. Now they go from 2.6 to 2.7... technology, it actually works =)



PS: I drove an Audi A3 Sportback for half a year as a replacement car while waiting for my Niro to arrive and that one had about 70db... but oh boy did I dislike that car. (My C4 got rear-ended end of last year)

PPS: I'm pretty sure my C4 Grand Picasso was even more silent or at least felt like it; but I haven't got any numbers on it... might ask a friend to test it out.



(**: before my phone (Lumia 950) would indicate 80db, now it hoovers more around 75db but I'll admit it depends a lot on what road I'm on and I haven't been all too scientific about keeping track of where I measured things)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Since I got my Niro PHEV, I've found that the tire noise is the loudest thing in the car in town and on the highway. At 40 mph, the z weighted noise (measuring low frequency sounds transmitted through the tires and suspension into the vehicle) averages 71 dB. The A weighted noise at the same speed is just 55dB, so wind noise isn't really an issue at all. I'm measuring the noise levels with the "Sound Analyzer" app by Dominique Rodrigues off the google play store. I calibrated the app with the background procedure, and I've record several sound files, averaging them out.
I'm considering replacing the stock Michelin Energy Saver A/S with Continental TrueContact Tour tires. Tire Rack's noise comfort rating is an 8.02 for TrueContact which also performs well in snow, ice, and handling, which considering I'm going to move back to Colorado, are really important.
Does anybody already have these tires? Would you be willing to give me a calibrated sounds reading?
Unfortunately the OP has no longer frequents this site. I admit I'm a tire geek. :nerd: Since tires are the only contact I have with with terra firma at 70 mph in the rain I always upgrade my new car tires. I want the best I can get for safety purposes while at the same time provided good overall performance and superior comfort. Toward that end, I tracked down the OP & spoke with him. He now has Conti's TrueContact Touring tires and said they the road noise was significantly reduced (didn't provide dBs) in his Niro without negatively affecting mpg or any other characteristics.

In my research the best all around tire is either the the above Conti ($103 ea) or Michelin Cross Climate + ($156 ea) or Vredestein Quatrac 5 ($103 ea). Tire rack has extensive test data on all three tires on the same car. https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tests/testDisplay.jsp?ttid=236 & https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tests/testDisplay.jsp?ttid=231

For me the Mich price is too high for the small difference in performance. The latter two have the 3 Mt snowflake rating suggesting they are a good winter tire yet the Conti test results show it stopping better in snow & ice than the other two. Compared to the Vrest the Conti is 1 lb lighter and has a slightly larger tread width and got the best MPG. IMO the Conti is the best all around tire and nicely priced.:) All things considered I'm ordering tires Conti Tours tomorrow! Will provide an update later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,946 Posts
I have zero doubt that softer summer tires or indeed many all season tires will be quieter than the Michelins, or exhibit different characteristics on certain road surfaces. But I've yet to see a credible report that one of those gets better mpg than the Michelins. Compared to other high efficiency tires, the Michelins are notably quiet and generally reported better efficiency.

I don't want to diss objective tire testing, but even there confounding variables make it difficult for the buyer with a different car and wheel diameter and width. Factors include testing focus (often feel and performance on great cars), temperature and weather, and tread depth. New tires do not perform the way that they do in midlife.

Hatchbacks and other open cars will always exhibit more road noise than sedans, just a fact. I've replaced tires on other cars specifically for noise with great results, but I have to say, the Niro is no luxury car, yet it is still the quietest car I've ever owned (now with 25,000 miles on the OEM Michelins). As the focus on hybrids is efficiency, I will be replacing the highly satisfactory Michelins with the same, likely around the 70/80 mark reported by other users.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
I have zero doubt that softer summer tires or indeed many all season tires will be quieter than the Michelins, or exhibit different characteristics on certain road surfaces. But I've yet to see a credible report that one of those gets better mpg than the Michelins. Compared to other high efficiency tires, the Michelins are notably quiet and generally reported better efficiency.

I don't want to diss objective tire testing, but even there confounding variables make it difficult for the buyer with a different car and wheel diameter and width. Factors include testing focus (often feel and performance on great cars), temperature and weather, and tread depth. New tires do not perform the way that they do in midlife.

Hatchbacks and other open cars will always exhibit more road noise than sedans, just a fact. I've replaced tires on other cars specifically for noise with great results, but I have to say, the Niro is no luxury car, yet it is still the quietest car I've ever owned (now with 25,000 miles on the OEM Michelins). As the focus on hybrids is efficiency, I will be replacing the highly satisfactory Michelins with the same, likely around the 70/80 mark reported by other users.
I agree, there are many variables that can affect the results of tire testing. Sometimes Tire Rack & Consumer Reports have considerable different takes on the same tire.

I also agree that if mpg is your top concern, that the OEM Michelin Energy Saver A/S seems to be an excellent tire with a better balance of overall characteristics than most tires marketed for high MPG.

But the gains can be relatively small, depending one's annual miles driven. Regarding fuel efficiency CR states: Our testing of performance all-season tires showed a 27 percent difference in rolling resistance between the best and worst performing tires. Over 12,000 miles driven, that 27 percent difference in resistance equals about 13.4 gallons of gas separating the best performer from the worst, based on average fuel economy. It adds up to about $40 per year, or $215 over the life of a set of tires—about 66,800 miles for a performance all-season tire, based on CR testing. We based our savings calculation on the current average U.S. gas price of $2.88 per gallon, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.
https://www.consumerreports.org/tires/low-rolling-resistance-tires-can-save-you-money-at-pump/

I'm hoping that the fact that my new tire /wheel combo will be 3 lbs less (about 8%) than the OEM package will result in little or no loss of mpg. But it's a guess at best! Rolling rolling rolling, kept those Niros rolling! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,946 Posts
So the key language in CR's test is "performance" all season tires. That is a long way from efficiency all season tires, and I've seen reports of a switch from OEM Michelins efficiency tires to other brand's "green tires" dropping efficiency by 5 mpg. Interspersed with many such reports of dropped mpg (often in the range of 3 mpg) are a few reports of "I didn't notice a difference". While these reports are all anecdotal, I give them a lot of weight as it is the same driver and car, just different tires. The "I didn't notice a difference" group's opinion is highly suspect of those who don't pay a lot of attention to tank mpg.

Switching from the OEM Michelin's to a performance (sticky) tire is going to be noticeable. Of course, if that results in a quieter ride and perhaps increased safety or perception of such, that is certainly to the benefit of some buyers. The worst part of such experiments to me is that you are now stuck with the new tires for better or worse for 50,000 plus miles. Expensive experiment to me. But as I said, I'm pretty happy with how quiet my Niro is to previous cars owned and handling and braking is sufficient for its status as an economy car. If I had a sports car and was interested in canyon or track driving, yup, such experiments would just be part of the expense of such a hobby. I bought the Niro to save money and the environment, and to stimulate my OCD.
 
21 - 36 of 36 Posts
Top